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Old 09-06-2009, 11:06 PM   #1
kcaz
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New to Linux/Unix


Hello, I have just started looking into Unix, and I know this is only a Linux forum but I can't find any better forums for Unix alone so sorry.

Anyways this is just a general question relating to Unix/Linux so I'm sorry if it's in the wrong place.

I've been looking into Unix and what I've found is that there are free variants (like Linux) and commercial variants. I'm guessing that the commercial version is more of a ligit operating system, but the free ones are just fine for beginning programming?

Thanks for taking the time to read this,
~Kcaz
 
Old 09-06-2009, 11:49 PM   #2
kdelover
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Most of the linux operating systems are legit and the free Os can be used for anything ,even day to day work,browsing,listening to music\movies e.t.c
 
Old 09-06-2009, 11:51 PM   #3
gregorian
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Free is good enough for most people. You should never have the need to buy a commercial version. No one I know has ever required one.
 
Old 09-07-2009, 12:03 AM   #4
crabboy
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The free versions are very legit. The commercial versions offer a few advantages like 24/7 phone support.
 
Old 09-07-2009, 12:31 AM   #5
r3sistance
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcaz View Post
I've been looking into Unix and what I've found is that there are free variants (like Linux) and commercial variants. I'm guessing that the commercial version is more of a ligit operating system, but the free ones are just fine for beginning programming?
If anything it's the opposite way around for Unix, it was the start of the open-source movement however it was too open to being abused by corperations/buisnesses/people who just repackaged free versions as their "own" variants with nothing added on to them and charged for them. Or if they did add things to the unix distributions they did not have to publish their additions that they made and could basically take an entire OS and only add one or two small improvements.

Linux addresses this with the GNU (Not Unix) license that makes it harder to pull off such things, while commericalised distributions are still possible, the source code needs to be published and available for free distribution if my memory serves me correct.

Generally paid for distributions of Linux and Unix should only be done for support purposes and this mainly only effects corperations or buisnesses that have systems that demand having that level of support for whatever reason.
 
Old 09-07-2009, 01:01 AM   #6
nigelc
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Hello,
I have seen/had open solaris free in a magazine.
With software free does not mean bad.
 
Old 09-07-2009, 01:12 AM   #7
beckettisdogg
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Red face

in terms of the quality only, they are about the same.

commercial ones come with technical supports.

in Linux world, just because something is free does not mean it has a lower quality or "lighter" than things you have to pay for.

nowadays, Ubuntu is the most well-known distribution among both experts and rookies.

and also keep in mind that you can have both windows and linux on the same computer, and run windows programs WHILE you are running linux, using Sun Microsystem's Virtual Box available for free at www.virtualbox.org

Last edited by beckettisdogg; 09-07-2009 at 01:15 AM.
 
Old 09-07-2009, 01:36 AM   #8
windtalker10
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Unix is Unix and Linux is Linux.
Doesn't matter if you have paid money for either of them or not.
It's kind of like someone giving you a hot dog and you have also paid for one.
They're still both a hot dog.
If all you're going to do is learn programming, either one is adequate for the task.
If you plan on using the box in an everyday situation though, I'd lean a tad more towards Linux.
Unix is stable but the ones I have used in the past can be a pita at times, especially if you're going to depend on using flash via the net.
 
Old 09-07-2009, 10:43 AM   #9
kcaz
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So for example between Linux, BSD, and OpenSoloris Linux is the way to go? And then within Linux Ubuntu is the way to go?
 
Old 09-07-2009, 11:04 AM   #10
Wim Sturkenboom
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Quote:
And then within Linux Ubuntu is the way to go?
Nobody said that. It however is considered to be one of the most popular distributions at this moment. But a default Ubuntu install is not very suitable for programming. You have to install extra packages (can't remember which ones) and the biggest problem (my personal opinion) is to find out which ones.
 
Old 09-07-2009, 11:25 AM   #11
i92guboj
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No one can tell you what the way to go is for you.

Linux, BSD, Open Solaris are different OS's. All of them relate in a lesser or greater way to Unix, but there's no UNIX'o'metter around. There are opinions for all tastes. Linux themselves (there are quite a lot of different distributions) can be quite different in some regards.

About support, there are open OS's that offer paid support (RedHat), that's not exclusive for commercial Os's. All the free Linuxes will benefit from the support of the community, in this forums, other similar ones, mailing lists and from very capable persons (even first hand support from the developers themselves).

Linux is usually better for desktops because there's better support for hardware, and the range of supported devices is usually higher. It's more dynamic in a sense, while other OS's, like BSD's can take a bit longer to support the latest and greatest, being FreeBSD maybe the closest to Linux in that regard. That doesn't mean you can't have a BSD based desktop, it just means you are going to have less choices in both hardware and software, or you git get them later.

The best would be to try them yourself and decide. Everyone's experience is quite different when it comes to choosing an OS. This is -mainly- a Linux forum, so, it's quite obvious what the preferred choice is going to be when you ask here. Isn't it?

Ps. About Ubuntu, well, I've never liked it. I like to know what's going under the hood, and Ubuntu likes to hide everything minimally resembling Linux (or Unix), which only makes it difficult to diagnose problems or deal with problems. Linux is Linux, it shouldn't be trying to mimic something else, but it's just my view. Everyone is free to disagree with that of course.

Last edited by i92guboj; 09-07-2009 at 11:28 AM.
 
Old 09-07-2009, 02:36 PM   #12
kcaz
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[mod_edit]name calling removed[/mod_edit]

Anyways... I know like you said it's all about personal taste, but which Linux do you like?
My goal is to go under the hood and see how things work, so is there any Linux distro you would say is good for that but maybe a little beginner friendly too?

Thanks,
~Kcaz

Last edited by Tinkster; 09-07-2009 at 03:07 PM. Reason: mod_edit
 
Old 09-07-2009, 02:46 PM   #13
i92guboj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcaz View Post
[mod_edit]see above[/mod_edit]
Anyways... I know like you said it's all about personal taste, but which Linux do you like?
My goal is to go under the hood and see how things work, so is there any Linux distro you would say is good for that but maybe a little beginner friendly too?

Thanks,
~Kcaz
I'd probably go Debian or Slackware in that case. There's always time to try Ubuntu if you really feel they are over the top for you.

If you truly want to get under the hood, there's Linux From Scratch and Gentoo, though swimming in that pool without practice can be a bit more complicated. Not impossible though, overall if you are not scared of reading manuals.

Last edited by Tinkster; 09-07-2009 at 03:09 PM. Reason: mod_edit
 
Old 09-07-2009, 03:03 PM   #14
kcaz
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Yeah I think I'll start with Debien then try LFS after looking around a little bit
 
Old 09-08-2009, 02:27 AM   #15
tpsbpl
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if u want full functionality and speed as debian,with less hassel, try knoppix it is complete OS or switch to SABAYON
 
  


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