LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 04-24-2012, 01:41 AM   #1
vincywiz
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2012
Posts: 8

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
New at this and want to use LINUX


Hello all:


I just joined the forum and don't really have a specific question as yet; but I am considering installing UBUNTU (or other suitable LINUX product) on my DELL PE 2850. I am told that Windows server 2008 is easiest/best for this server so I am a bit concerned. any info anyone can provide to arrest these concerns would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks
(Karl (newbie)
 
Old 04-24-2012, 01:56 AM   #2
EricTRA
LQ Guru
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Distribution: Fedora 20 with Awesome WM
Posts: 6,805
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295
Hello Karl and welcome to LinuxQuestions,

Servers are just hardware and are not subject to whats best for it. It depends on your choice. Whatever you want to work with on your server, be it Windows, Linux, BSD, ... the choice is yours and your server will perform normal with whatever operating system you install on it taking into account the type of hardware, architecture and so on. It's only normal that you cannot install AIX for example on Intel architecture (AFAIK). It's common knowledge that Linux performs way better on a server level (and in my personal opinion on desktop too), then Windows, so I wouldn't worry about what 'you were told' about Windows. I guess whoever told you only refers to the different versions of Windows Server and has no knowledge whatsoever about Linux, no offense.

Looking forward to your participation in the forums. Have fun with Linux.

Kind regards,

Eric
 
Old 04-24-2012, 02:23 AM   #3
pan64
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2012
Location: Hungary
Distribution: debian i686 (solaris)
Posts: 8,133

Rep: Reputation: 2272Reputation: 2272Reputation: 2272Reputation: 2272Reputation: 2272Reputation: 2272Reputation: 2272Reputation: 2272Reputation: 2272Reputation: 2272Reputation: 2272
just to clear words: Windows server 2008 is a name of an OS. A server host is a machine which is used to run (host) server softwares. A server software is an application which has a functionality you can use. For example a web server will show you web pages, a database server will store your data, a mail server will handle your mails.
The Windows Server 2008 is an OS designed to run server softwares (like MS exchange server), Windows 7 Home edition is also an OS, but designed for personal usage, running client programs (like browser, office ...)
In the linux world all the distributions can be used as server or as pc (=personal computer). Also all the hardwares can be used for both (but in general a pc has better graphic). It will mainly depends on the configuration and the softwares installed on it.

Windows and linux are just two really different kind of OSs.
 
Old 04-24-2012, 12:30 PM   #4
vincywiz
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2012
Posts: 8

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Question I thank you!

Thanks to both EricTRA and pan64...I appreciate the clarification and additional education on the subject. Specifically; I intend to use the machine as a WEBSERVER to host my own websites and possibly those of my friends - for fee or free; that I haven't decided yet...as you can see, I am not even close to that point.
So now that I have revealed what I would like to do with the machine, here's a question: First; I DO know that WIN 7 WIN 2k3 etc are OS and I also understand that WIN 7 is not a good choice for WEBSERVER because of the limited concurrent connections built-in...so which LINUX (or subsidiary company) product would you recommend and why? I am leaning on UBUNTU but open to REDHAT or any other. I spoke to the customer service folks at LINUX and they suggest try either for 30 days and then decide but if I could short-circuit the peocess I'd prefer that.
 
Old 04-24-2012, 12:35 PM   #5
suicidaleggroll
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: Colorado
Distribution: OpenSUSE, CentOS
Posts: 5,260

Rep: Reputation: 1948Reputation: 1948Reputation: 1948Reputation: 1948Reputation: 1948Reputation: 1948Reputation: 1948Reputation: 1948Reputation: 1948Reputation: 1948Reputation: 1948
I personally wouldn't use Ubuntu for a webserver (or any server, really). While it can be done, there are other distros that are better designed for that kind of use. My personal choice for your goal would be CentOS, but everybody has their own opinions.
 
Old 04-24-2012, 01:38 PM   #6
DavidMcCann
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: CentOS, Salix
Posts: 4,166

Rep: Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223
If you are setting up a server, particularly a webserver, you want something that is secure and easily kept so, and which has long-term support, not requiring annual replacement. You won't want to install a lot of software, so something that allows you to choose what to install would be fine. Linux servers are usually run without a GUI (although you can have one if you prefer) as this makes them easier to maintain: the less stuff you have running the easier it is to manage what you have got. According to Microsoft themselves, only a minority of servers run Windows, so that should tell you something!

CentOS is the most widely used Linux for webservers. When you run the installer, it asks what sort of setup you want to create, and "webserver" is actually one of the choices. The current version will have security patches available until 2017 (if I remember rightly).

Debian is also very reliable and it too offers you the choice of a custom webserver installation. The current version is supported until 2014.
 
Old 04-24-2012, 04:38 PM   #7
salasi
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Directly above centre of the earth, UK
Distribution: SuSE, plus some hopping
Posts: 4,053

Rep: Reputation: 881Reputation: 881Reputation: 881Reputation: 881Reputation: 881Reputation: 881Reputation: 881
Quote:
Originally Posted by vincywiz View Post
...so which LINUX (or subsidiary company) product would you recommend and why? I am leaning on UBUNTU but open to REDHAT or any other. I spoke to the customer service folks at LINUX and they suggest try either for 30 days and then decide but if I could short-circuit the peocess I'd prefer that.
I can't think of any subsidiary company to Linux, or what it might mean, and I have no idea who the customer service folks at Linux might be. That said:
  • Ubuntu does have a server version and some versions of Ubuntu are LTS - Ubuntu server isn't terrible, but it doesn't have any very clear advantages over anything else, if you don't come to the table with specific Ubuntu experience already. But, if you are going with Ubuntu, go with a version that has a reasonable support period, which will be an LTS version.
  • If you were seeking a direct recommendation, then mine would be Centos (essentially, Red Hat without the branding), Scientific or Debian, as free options, and Red Hat or SLES if you want to pay for support (SLES support is probably better, SLED is probably cheaper). Don't dismiss the support option out of hand - if you are new to this, you might need all the support you can get.
  • What is easiest depends on your experience - people who only have windows experience may find Linux a culture shock. At the very least, you'll want to get to know Linux as fast as you can. Additionally running Linux on your home PC would be a good idea, because that will help a bit with Linux experience.
 
Old 04-24-2012, 11:56 PM   #8
vincywiz
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2012
Posts: 8

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Lightbulb a big "thank you"

Thanks for all the excellent information. I am in no way 'grading' the responses but I particularly like the response(s) which clearly come from a place of sound knowledge but still manages to be humble in disseminating the information. I am a long-standing IEEE member and licensed EE (audio design) so I know what it is to possess advanced knowledge; the trick is being able to pass it on and w/o the arrogance that is often accompanied - all we have are borrowed talents, so I appreciate the spirit of the LINUX commuinity in that regard.
This is a great forum and I'm glad to be a part. I will begin the install on Saturday and I am sure I'll have questions so you'll hear from me again next Monday (G'd willing).

So yeah...CentOS it is.


THANKS!
 
Old 04-25-2012, 01:41 AM   #9
EricTRA
LQ Guru
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Gibraltar, Gibraltar
Distribution: Fedora 20 with Awesome WM
Posts: 6,805
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295Reputation: 1295
Quote:
Originally Posted by vincywiz View Post
Thanks to both EricTRA and pan64...I appreciate the clarification and additional education on the subject. Specifically; I intend to use the machine as a WEBSERVER to host my own websites and possibly those of my friends - for fee or free; that I haven't decided yet...as you can see, I am not even close to that point.
So now that I have revealed what I would like to do with the machine, here's a question: First; I DO know that WIN 7 WIN 2k3 etc are OS and I also understand that WIN 7 is not a good choice for WEBSERVER because of the limited concurrent connections built-in...so which LINUX (or subsidiary company) product would you recommend and why? I am leaning on UBUNTU but open to REDHAT or any other. I spoke to the customer service folks at LINUX and they suggest try either for 30 days and then decide but if I could short-circuit the peocess I'd prefer that.
Hi,

I'd never use Ubuntu on a server (nor on a desktop for that matter, but that's just my personal opinion). I'd prefer Debian for its stability. Furthermore there's a big issue (again my opinion) you should keep in mind. If you go with Red Hat for the support, then you'll have a great and stable distro, but... The versions of software available on their system tend to run behind compared to for example Debian. Since CentOS is a 'clone' of Red Hat they too tend to run behind. Debian on the other hand has more recent software versions in their repositories but has no big company behind it for support. Instead it has a great community and even here on LQ there are a lot of Debian 'gurus'. I mention the issue of software versions because in my opinion it's pretty important if you're going to run a webserver, to have the latest version, bug fixes, features, ... available.

Kind regards,

Eric
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:46 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration