LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-14-2013, 12:50 PM   #1
textillis
Member
 
Registered: May 2013
Location: Northern Rivers, NSW, Australia
Distribution: Slackware64-current, Mint Nadya
Posts: 299

Rep: Reputation: 2
KDE versus Xfce on security of root


Hi folks,
New Slacker here with a question about root: i've used other distros a bit and always had to "sudo" to become root.
It seems that root is the default status in slackware, though, if this is true, different desktop environments seem to have a different approach to the issue, as instanced by the following warning I'm getting, having just opened up Xfce for the first time:
"You are using the root account, you may harm your system"

2 Questions issue from this:
1. how important is it to heed this warning? is it really only an issue when in a gui?
2. if it is important, how can i simply create a user for myself
( i tried adduser and got prompted with issues surrounding groups which is totally new to me)

Thanks for any help,
Tex
 
Old 05-14-2013, 01:06 PM   #2
JWJones
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2009
Location: Cascadia
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 922

Rep: Reputation: 276Reputation: 276Reputation: 276
Xfce includes the warning in every Thunar window (file manager). This is a feature of Xfce, and is unrelated to Slackware specifically. Root is the same regardless of desktop environment, it is no more or less secure/insecure from KDE to Xfce.

IT IS IMPORTANT TO HEED THIS MESSAGE, particularly as a new user. Distros that use sudo have created a bad situation in Linux, in my opinion.

You were on the right track with adduser, just accept the defaults, and create the user.

http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:beginners_guide

RTFM, seriously.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-14-2013, 01:08 PM   #3
suicidaleggroll
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: Colorado
Distribution: OpenSUSE, CentOS
Posts: 5,355

Rep: Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989
The question is moot, since you should never be logging into a DE as root to begin with.
 
Old 05-14-2013, 01:12 PM   #4
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,131
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833
Quote:
Originally Posted by textillis View Post
It seems that root is the default status in slackware
No, it is not. Indeed, root is the only account available after a fresh install, but you should create an unprivileged user as soon as possible and use that for your everyday work. Using a GUI as root is very bad practice. If you need to run software as root use su (on the CLI) or kdesu (for GUI software, but usually GUI software will ask you for a root password if needed).
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-14-2013, 01:13 PM   #5
textillis
Member
 
Registered: May 2013
Location: Northern Rivers, NSW, Australia
Distribution: Slackware64-current, Mint Nadya
Posts: 299

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
The question is moot, since you should never be logging into a DE as root to begin with.
Well, that me be so; but here I am, just making my first steps in slackware, and I have not come across an option in the installation process or the notes that i've read to create a new user. And this is something that I am used to in the few other linux distros I've had a little experience with.
 
Old 05-14-2013, 01:17 PM   #6
textillis
Member
 
Registered: May 2013
Location: Northern Rivers, NSW, Australia
Distribution: Slackware64-current, Mint Nadya
Posts: 299

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
No, it is not. Indeed, root is the only account available after a fresh install, but you should create an unprivileged user as soon as possible and use that for your everyday work. Using a GUI as root is very bad practice. If you need to run software as root use su (on the CLI) or kdesu (for GUI software, but usually GUI software will ask you for a root password if needed).
I'm being prompted for a initial group; when i enter one that i invent, it insists that this does not exist.
Would you be so kind as to give me the command for listing the existing groups available to a new user?
tx
 
Old 05-14-2013, 01:18 PM   #7
suicidaleggroll
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: Colorado
Distribution: OpenSUSE, CentOS
Posts: 5,355

Rep: Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989Reputation: 1989
Quote:
Originally Posted by textillis View Post
I'm being prompted for a initial group; when i enter one that i invent, it insists that this does not exist.
Would you be so kind as to give me the command for listing the existing groups available to a new user?
tx
Add the group first:

Code:
groupadd -g GID groupname
useradd -m -g GID -u UID username
passwd username
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-14-2013, 01:19 PM   #8
DavidMcCann
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: CentOS, Salix
Posts: 4,261

Rep: Reputation: 1245Reputation: 1245Reputation: 1245Reputation: 1245Reputation: 1245Reputation: 1245Reputation: 1245Reputation: 1245Reputation: 1245
Quote:
Originally Posted by textillis View Post
Well, that may be so; but here I am, just making my first steps in slackware, and I have not come across an option in the installation process or the notes that i've read to create a new user. And this is something that I am used to in the few other linux distros I've had a little experience with.
Very true. Most ask you to create a user as part of the installation, but Slackware (and Arch) leave it to you. It's one of those distros where you really need to have read all the instructions before installing: see the link given by JWJones.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-14-2013, 01:20 PM   #9
fogpipe
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Distribution: Slackware 64 -current,
Posts: 550

Rep: Reputation: 194Reputation: 194
Type "man useradd" at a prompt for all the options, but to create a user account for your self type "useradd -m username" where "username" is the name of the user you want to create.
The passwd program will let you set/change a password for that user.

My experience doing the above is that you dont really have to worry about the group. The group is usually named after the user you create and given a gid (iirc) of 1000

Last edited by fogpipe; 05-14-2013 at 01:24 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-14-2013, 01:23 PM   #10
JWJones
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2009
Location: Cascadia
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 922

Rep: Reputation: 276Reputation: 276Reputation: 276
And furthermore...

http://docs.slackware.com/slackbook:users
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-14-2013, 01:27 PM   #11
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,131
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833Reputation: 4833
Quote:
Originally Posted by textillis View Post
I'm being prompted for a initial group; when i enter one that i invent, it insists that this does not exist.
Would you be so kind as to give me the command for listing the existing groups available to a new user?
tx
As a first time user just use the default, except when it comes to additional groups for your user, press the up-arrow to get a list of groups that you should accept. When using Slackware you should really start to read the documentation, for example the link given by JWJones, which explains how to add users the correct way.
You also should read the Slackbook, not only for learning Slackware, but for general linux/Unix concepts, like users and groups.

Slackware is not a hold your hands distribution, as you already have recognized, which means that is has a somewhat steeper learning curve. If you are not experienced with Linux core concepts you will probably in the first days spend more time reading than working with the system, but once you mastered the basics you will see the simplicity and elegance of systems like Slackware.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-14-2013, 01:30 PM   #12
Diantre
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 496

Rep: Reputation: 213Reputation: 213Reputation: 213
Quote:
Originally Posted by textillis View Post
I'm being prompted for a initial group; when i enter one that i invent, it insists that this does not exist.
Would you be so kind as to give me the command for listing the existing groups available to a new user?
tx
You can safely use the defaults. For instance:

Code:
bash-4.2# adduser foo

Login name for new user: foo

User ID ('UID') [ defaults to next available ]: 

Initial group [ users ]:    (Press ENTER here)
Additional UNIX groups:

Users can belong to additional UNIX groups on the system.
For local users using graphical desktop login managers such
as XDM/KDM, users may need to be members of additional groups
to access the full functionality of removable media devices.

* Security implications *
Please be aware that by adding users to additional groups may
potentially give access to the removable media of other users.

If you are creating a new user for remote shell access only,
users do not need to belong to any additional groups as standard,
so you may press ENTER at the next prompt.

Press ENTER to continue without adding any additional groups
Or press the UP arrow key to add/select/edit additional groups
:  audio cdrom floppy plugdev video power netdev lp scanner
And then just follow the prompts.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-14-2013, 01:32 PM   #13
JWJones
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2009
Location: Cascadia
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 922

Rep: Reputation: 276Reputation: 276Reputation: 276
Quote:
Originally Posted by textillis View Post
Well, that me be so; but here I am, just making my first steps in slackware, and I have not come across an option in the installation process or the notes that i've read to create a new user. And this is something that I am used to in the few other linux distros I've had a little experience with.
Welcome to the Slackware forums, btw!

Yes, most newbie distros these days have su disabled by default, and instead use sudo. Most intermediate distros still use su, but their installers prompt you to create an unprivileged user account (such as Debian and Fedora). As David said, distros such as Slackware and Arch (and Gentoo) leave this to you, they do not hold your hand.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-14-2013, 01:36 PM   #14
TroN-0074
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: Michigan USA
Distribution: OpenSUSE 13.2 64bit-Gnome on ASUS U52F
Posts: 1,444

Rep: Reputation: 340Reputation: 340Reputation: 340Reputation: 340
You can also install sudo and set it up using visudo to behave the same way it does in Ubuntu and Linux Mint.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-14-2013, 01:50 PM   #15
EDDY1
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Oakland,Ca
Distribution: wins7, Debian wheezy
Posts: 6,838

Rep: Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649Reputation: 649
Quote:
Originally Posted by textillis View Post
I'm being prompted for a initial group; when i enter one that i invent, it insists that this does not exist.
Would you be so kind as to give me the command for listing the existing groups available to a new user?
tx
When prompted for group I think you press tab & it'll give a default listing with cdrom, audio, video & a few others, then press enter.
Myy bad just noticed that it's answered in post #12

Last edited by EDDY1; 05-14-2013 at 01:52 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Linux security versus Windows security garylmartin Linux - General 2 09-11-2009 10:41 AM
Kernel tunable security parameter versus iptables argh2xxx Linux - Security 3 09-10-2008 06:15 PM
LXer: DistroWatch Weekly: Distributions and security updates, Fedora for KDE and Xfce LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 02-18-2008 07:11 AM
xfce versus gnome what are the benefits? chibiriqua Linux - Newbie 2 02-15-2006 03:34 AM
Re: SElinux and OpenBSD security versus other OS? wardialer Linux - Security 2 09-11-2004 12:58 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:15 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration