LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 03-07-2007, 10:52 PM   #1
EYEdROP
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: Prescott, AZ
Distribution: Fedora 23 Workstation XFCE
Posts: 92

Rep: Reputation: 15
How long did it take you...


to be able to use Linux as functionally as you used to use Win/OSX? Basically, Im wondering how long it took you to get to know linux really well. Im on my 5th day, and it seems really difficult. Ive spent all of my time fixing things, with little sucess. I know learning Linux is worth it, though. And I know its not easy, but I hate windows and cant afford a Mac. So I know Im on Linux for good
 
Old 03-07-2007, 11:18 PM   #2
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
It depends on how well you know Windows...

In my case, I was not the leat bit proficient on Windows and I learned to do more on Linux very quickly (few months)

Flip side: Linux has an asymptote--ie one can quickly get to the point where the last bits of knowledge come very slowly.
 
Old 03-07-2007, 11:23 PM   #3
PatrickNew
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Charleston, SC, USA
Distribution: Debian, Gentoo, Ubuntu, RHEL
Posts: 1,148
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 48
I probably used linux as functionally as windows after, 6 months top. But, I never knew much about Windows. I know I've learned more about linux (by a lot), than I ever knew about Windows
 
Old 03-07-2007, 11:39 PM   #4
EYEdROP
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: Prescott, AZ
Distribution: Fedora 23 Workstation XFCE
Posts: 92

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
What was the best learning source? I read alot on linux.org/lessons . Its a really good source. One thing I wished more people would do is instead of giving newbies code, explain what the code does, the aliases, and the reason He/she is having you type it.

One of the things that is difficult for me is typing commands that are drawn out and are very specific.
 
Old 03-07-2007, 11:47 PM   #5
detpenguin
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: lost in the midwest...
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 1,091

Rep: Reputation: 45
it took me prolly 6 months before i was comfortable using linux vs windows, i also tried a few different distro's before finding something that i love and use daily now...and here, 3 years later, i'm still learning.

there are some great online references to use. i used rute to get me going...and obviously LQ.org is amazing...and also tldp is full of information.
always remember, google is your friend!

*edit

a lot of times the easiest answer will be someone tossing a code at you, without giving a description of what/why it is or does. i do that myself sometimes. it's a bad habit, and i apologize if i ever do it to you...but i know if i'm checking the forums here and someone says "hey, how do i???" it's second nature almost for me to say "oh just type "code here" and although i know how and why it works, i sort of assume everyone who reads it does too...which obviously isn't true...so if anyone tosses code at you, don't be afraid to ask why or what or how...people here are great, and will usually tell you more than you ever needed to know about something...lol.

Last edited by detpenguin; 03-07-2007 at 11:52 PM.
 
Old 03-08-2007, 09:48 AM   #6
muddywaters
Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Distribution: mostly mepis
Posts: 427

Rep: Reputation: 30
How long did it take you....?

Well, still working at it. I came to linux with little pc experience. Windows was such a hassle to maintain, my thoughts were "there has to be something better out there". So far no regrets. Maybe not having much windows knowledge and ingrained windows habits was an advantage.

The learning process went something like;
1) Figuring out the filesystem. This helped http://www.pathname.com/fhs/
2) Learning about permissions
3) Printing out a bash cheatsheet and posting it on the wall behind the monitor
4) Learning the package manager and alternative ways to install software

After that it was mostly a matter of learning the desktop (kde in my case) and the apps/utilities. Is a learning a microsoft product really much different? Other than the fact MS documentation is better (more centrally) organized
 
Old 03-08-2007, 10:04 AM   #7
rocket357
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2007
Location: 127.0.0.1
Distribution: OpenBSD-CURRENT
Posts: 485
Blog Entries: 159

Rep: Reputation: 74
This is an excellent question...

Consider someone with no pc experience (umm, grandma, for instance). How long would it take her to learn Windows? Now then, once she's used to Windows, let's switch her over to Linux. There...she's confused because a lot of the stuff she learned for Windows doesn't work the same in Linux.

Now imagine if she learned Linux first. The same "learning curve" would apply if she switched to Windows.

Point is, sometimes it's harder to learn something if you've already got experience with a similar, yet fundamentally different, system. Linux and Windows serve the same purpose, yet they go about it differently, introducing a "learning curve" that is in all reality an accidental difficulty when switching from one to the other. I read an article concerning Linux users working with *BSD...the same accidental difficulty was present, but the point is, someone starting with *BSD and switching to Linux had to deal with the same difficulties (even though Linux and BSD are much more closely related than Linux and Windows or *BSD and Windows).

Now then, having come from a Windows background myself (sigh...), I'd have to say that it took me about 30 seconds to realize that I had my hands on something good when I booted up my first Linux installation...and it took me probably two months (or so) to get to the point that I could remove Windows from my computer without any drastic loss in productivity. (I don't play games quite so much as most people, I guess). It depends on how you use your computer.

Hang in there, EYEdROP, you'll be glad you did because it's worth every second of learning.

Last edited by rocket357; 03-08-2007 at 10:07 AM.
 
Old 03-08-2007, 10:55 AM   #8
titopoquito
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Lower Rhine region, Germany
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 (32 and 64 bit)
Posts: 1,594

Rep: Reputation: 124Reputation: 124
I'm maybe a late starter, I think it took me about one year of double booting to reach nearly the same efficiency. Not in all tasks, but some worked better then on Windows some worse. When I did the full switch to Linux my learning curve got much faster.

I still consider myself not a Linux expert, but an advanced newbie.
 
Old 03-08-2007, 11:26 AM   #9
evildarknight
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Paradise Mauritius
Distribution: Debian lenny, Jlime,Delilinux
Posts: 57

Rep: Reputation: 15
it took me around a year to fully get hold of linux but i still can get get a hold of firewalls!!!
i ve learn a lot from linuxquestions and www.tldp.org
before that i was a full user of ms windows having used all the oses produced by ms billy
 
Old 03-08-2007, 12:56 PM   #10
custangro
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: California
Distribution: Fedora , CentOS , RHEL
Posts: 1,971
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 208Reputation: 208Reputation: 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by EYEdROP
What was the best learning source? I read alot on linux.org/lessons . Its a really good source. One thing I wished more people would do is instead of giving newbies code, explain what the code does, the aliases, and the reason He/she is having you type it.

One of the things that is difficult for me is typing commands that are drawn out and are very specific.
I would use the "Unleashed" books. I am currently reading "Fedora Core 6 Unleashed", and it's VERY thurough. I think they have one for Ubuntu. You should check it out, You should start by looking at amazon here
 
Old 03-08-2007, 02:22 PM   #11
ethics
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Arch - Latest
Posts: 1,522

Rep: Reputation: 45
I figure about a year for me. I suppose i am fairly proficient in windows (2k,xp), so i knew which settings to tweak, tools to use etc.

The thing is i find Linux's functionality, scope and toolsets far greater, so i can achieve more using it than a windows system. I am constantly on XP at work wanting to write a shell script or use grep or the package manager, it just makes more sense to me.

I do like to keep my knowledge current in as many systems as i can though, you never know when it will come in handy.
 
Old 03-08-2007, 02:49 PM   #12
custangro
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: California
Distribution: Fedora , CentOS , RHEL
Posts: 1,971
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 208Reputation: 208Reputation: 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by ethics
I do like to keep my knowledge current in as many systems as i can though, you never know when it will come in handy.
That's a good point. I agree with you 100%. I know some people that are like "I am NEVER using Windows again...I'm replacing everything with (Insert other operating system here)" But they don't realize is that the more you know about a variety of thing...the better. Although I agree that Linux is better (IMO) and I prefer it; I don't think that Windows will go away. So as an IT person, you should have at least SOME knowledge in Windows (an yes this does mean using VISTA once in a while....wow...that left a bad taste in my mouth...)

-custangro
 
Old 03-08-2007, 08:12 PM   #13
JimBass
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: New York City
Distribution: Debian Sid 2.6.32
Posts: 2,100

Rep: Reputation: 49
I would say it took close to a year to be as competent in linux as windows for me. I was lucky enough to have 2 machines, so I kept one with 2000 professional then the other with Red Hat 9 then Fedora Core 1. I bought a new machine about 9 or so months into the linux project with the intent to dual boot, and never bothered to install win on it. I also had the good fortune to discover Debian and drop Fedora in the trash.

I think one of the best things you can do to help yourself along would be to do everything at the prompt rather than through the GUI. It is good that you're asking questions about written codes, because that is where the power of linux really comes out. Clicking on pictures is great, but you have no real knowledge of what is happening. The command line is not that forgiving. Also, the CLI is much better when moving between systems. If I get placed on slackware 11 when I'm used to Debian I can get around well through the CLI, but if you use KDE and get put on a machine with Gnome, you're fairly useless.

Another thing that might help is if you use KDE, within Konqueror, click on windows and select "show terminal emulator". That will show you at the command line how to do everything you are doing graphically. There probably is a similar tool in Gnome, I just don't know what it is.

Peace,
JimBass

Last edited by JimBass; 03-08-2007 at 08:13 PM.
 
Old 03-08-2007, 08:44 PM   #14
Sepero
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Tampa, Florida, USA
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 734
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 32
I started using Linux back in 2002. It took approximately 1 year to safely say, "Yep, now I can delete MS for good".
 
Old 03-08-2007, 10:00 PM   #15
masonm
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Following the white rabbit
Distribution: Slackware64 14.2 Solus
Posts: 2,264

Rep: Reputation: 51
As I went from DOS to Linux and then learned Windoze later on it's a whole different situation. I always found the MS OS to be frustrating and nearly useless.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
printf unsigned long long int? blackzone Programming 9 03-04-2008 01:41 PM
Long Island Linux Users Group- LILUG- New York - Long Island secretservgy Linux User Groups (LUG) 0 02-16-2007 09:48 AM
How to convert "unsigned long long" to "char pointer"? novicehacker Linux - Kernel 1 11-20-2006 01:57 AM
long filename & long directory tree slack66 Slackware 1 09-20-2006 10:56 AM
LONG LONG "lost" /home directory post Mark_in_Hollywood Linux - Newbie 5 09-20-2006 12:47 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:10 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration