LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 08-02-2008, 01:51 AM   #1
kzdev
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2008
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
How can I start with Linux?


For a lot of years I use windows XP, and I always listen about linux, but I dont know how to start with that. Also I listen that with linux can edit the code of any open software, is that true? What linux distribution can edit software code, and is best for programming with C language?
 
Old 08-02-2008, 02:08 AM   #2
joewp
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Posts: 3

Rep: Reputation: 0
I'd say the best way to start with Linux is to pick a flavor (many people start with Fedora, Ubuntu or Suze) and install it on a virtual machine. VirtualBox is a free, open source product that allows you to boot from the Linux install disk and run your favorite release of Linux on your Windows/XP desktop.

Yes, you can edit the code of any open source software, including the Linux operating system. All distributions have the source code available (they have to under the GPL license) and much of the source code is C and C++.
 
Old 08-02-2008, 02:09 AM   #3
Nylex
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,464

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by kzdev View Post
What linux distribution can edit software code, and is best for programming with C language?
Any distribution is fine for programming.
 
Old 08-02-2008, 03:22 AM   #4
linuxlover.chaitanya
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Nagpur, India
Distribution: Cent OS 5/6, Ubuntu Server 10.04
Posts: 4,629

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Best way to start linux is to get a copy of Live cd for distro of your choice and give it a try. This way can save a lot of time in installing and de-installing just in case you do not like it and give a peek at some other flavor.
Newbies usually start off with Ubuntu as it makes people new to linux more comfortable by taking the experience nearer to windows. Though not all may agree with me in this regard.
Another advantage of starting with live cd is that it can give you an idea of your hardware support with linux. I would not say linux does not support particular hardware. Rather hardware manufacturers of these kinds do not care to make drivers available for linux. But most of the hardware is supported by Ubuntu which has a newer version Hardy and it is also a LTS. So you may want to start off with it.
 
Old 08-02-2008, 03:47 AM   #5
jax8
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: Australia
Distribution: Ubuntu, Fedora 10
Posts: 632

Rep: Reputation: 31
1. Start with a KDE based distribution rather than Gnome as Gnome is ugly and lacks serious features. KDE is easier to use (contrary to popular belief) than other windows managers and has a full host of features. Some people think Gnome is easier to use because it is simple and you can't do anything with it - that is not true, it just makes the users annoyed (I speak from experience).

2. Download or order a CD, preferably a live CD like Kubuntu that you can also install if you like it. A 'live CD' allows you to run the software on the CD without installing anything, this allows you to test out linux.

3. Play around with the Graphical interface and experiment as much as you like. Look at the file system and see how it is different from windows. Try to find applications that are similar to Windows. Try to see the similarities and the differences. There are far more similarities than differences. Do this for about 3 days.

4. Start trying to fix your system. Installing correct drivers etc. Experiment with the command prompt. Read online tutorials and possibly buy a beginners book on linux.
 
Old 08-02-2008, 03:57 AM   #6
AceofSpades19
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Chilliwack,BC.Canada
Distribution: Slackware64 -current
Posts: 2,079

Rep: Reputation: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by jax8 View Post
1. Start with a KDE based distribution rather than Gnome as Gnome is ugly and lacks serious features. KDE is easier to use (contrary to popular belief) than other windows managers and has a full host of features. Some people think Gnome is easier to use because it is simple and you can't do anything with it - that is not true, it just makes the users annoyed (I speak from experience).
That is just flame bait right there
 
Old 08-02-2008, 04:17 AM   #7
linuxlover.chaitanya
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Nagpur, India
Distribution: Cent OS 5/6, Ubuntu Server 10.04
Posts: 4,629

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
In no sense can Gnome be called ugly. Its a completely a personal preference for choosing distro, desktop environment and all sorts of eye candies. I have used kde and gnome both and finally settled for gnome but I know a lot of people who dislike both and use command line as far as possible and if necessity comes use Xfce or Icewm or or other small and light weight environments.
 
Old 08-02-2008, 10:25 AM   #8
David Lally
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2006
Location: Western Australia
Distribution: Debian Etch, PCLOS Gnome
Posts: 3

Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by jax8 View Post
1. Start with a KDE based distribution rather than Gnome as Gnome is ugly and lacks serious features. KDE is easier to use (contrary to popular belief) than other windows managers and has a full host of features. Some people think Gnome is easier to use because it is simple and you can't do anything with it - that is not true, it just makes the users annoyed (I speak from experience).
I though trolling was frowned upon in these places? You're either trolling or completely clueless. I can't decide which is worse.
 
Old 08-02-2008, 10:30 AM   #9
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
What are the rules on flamewars? How about until OP returns?...

IMHO, Gnome and KDE are now very close in terms of functionality. It should not be a significant factor for a newcomer. I prefer KDE, but I generally save my soapbox for other issues.
 
Old 08-02-2008, 10:53 AM   #10
David the H.
Bash Guru
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Osaka, Japan
Distribution: Debian sid + kde 3.5 & 4.4
Posts: 6,823

Rep: Reputation: 1957Reputation: 1957Reputation: 1957Reputation: 1957Reputation: 1957Reputation: 1957Reputation: 1957Reputation: 1957Reputation: 1957Reputation: 1957Reputation: 1957
The best thing to do is simply to dive in. Start by reading up a bit on the net about the history and design of Linux/Unix, it's file and system structure, and the ideas behind its development. Then grab a live CD like knoppix, or one of the *buntu install disks and play around with it a bit. Then when you feel a bit comfortable, go ahead and install a full system. Here you have several options including using a virtual machine or dual-booting. Even better would be if you have some old computer sitting around doing nothing that can be used as a practice machine to learn on. Linux is a great way to get more life out of old hardware.

Finally, and this is the most important point, be prepared to not understand some things at first. Many people go into Linux thinking of it as just a substitute for Windows. It's not. It's a completely different OS with a completely different philosophy behind it. There will be things that are confusing, or that just won't seem right to you at first. And realize also that Linux will not hold you by the hand. You'll certainly have to do things manually that Windows hides behind automatic settings screens. But those who are prepared to take the time to learn usually discover just how nice it is to have the power and freedom to what YOU want with your system.

Last edited by David the H.; 08-02-2008 at 10:54 AM.
 
Old 08-02-2008, 11:06 AM   #11
wraithe
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2006
Location: Australia
Distribution: Linux... :-)
Posts: 216
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 31
Its been answered above and I'll say it again, live cd/dvd distribution, then have a play...If the first one you put into your cd/dvd doesnt work, then dont despair, try another one...
have a play with different ones till you find one that looks and acts the way you want to start with, then from there you can alter it into what you want...
kde, gnome and icewm, etc etc are all types of desktops, you can have what you want...if someone doesnt like one and suggests another, thats there choice, you may not like either and want something completely different, so what, thats linux...
Either and any can do what you want with enough playing around with, who cares if you want it to make an ice cream sundae everytime it boots...
But most of all, have a play with linux and find your way around it...
Its best to get a live boot happening so you can see what its all about, then if you like it, install it to a partition, dont stress too much about partitions, just use a basic setup, most installers do a lot of the work for you, but it pays to make sure you read what its doing...
Then have a better play with an installed distro...
Give it a while of playing then you will be comfortable with it and able to set it up nicely, just for you..!
 
Old 08-02-2008, 03:18 PM   #12
mogrady
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Location: Lakeland, Florida
Distribution: Ubuntu, Xbuntu, Puppy, XP Pro
Posts: 111

Rep: Reputation: 15
Visit Distrowatch.com, in the upper left corner of the page are a couple search boxes, type in Live CD's and you will be presented with a wide choice of distro's to experiment with. I have had pretty good luck, not 100 % though, using rewriteable CD's to download and experiment with. I like PCLinuxOS 2007 (KDE) and Puppy Linux. Most homepages of the distro's you are interested in have either tutorials or detailed instructions on how to burn Live CD's and run the operating system.

Have Fun, Good Luck Michael
 
Old 08-03-2008, 06:05 AM   #13
resetreset
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Location: Cyberspace
Distribution: Dynebolic, Ubuntu 10.10
Posts: 1,340

Rep: Reputation: 62
just to add my opinion - i use dynebolic, i'm absolutely in *love* with it and it has gcc the C compiler and nano an editor -all you should need for programming. (be warned that some of the audio softwares and k3b dont work).
 
Old 08-03-2008, 12:46 PM   #14
AceofSpades19
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Chilliwack,BC.Canada
Distribution: Slackware64 -current
Posts: 2,079

Rep: Reputation: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by resetreset View Post
just to add my opinion - i use dynebolic, i'm absolutely in *love* with it and it has gcc the C compiler and nano an editor -all you should need for programming. (be warned that some of the audio softwares and k3b dont work).
Emacs is better then nano
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Never used Linux-system has Gentoo Linux 1.12.9 installed where do I start? bradbtech Linux - Newbie 11 04-15-2008 06:07 AM
after i installed linux and tried start linux it hangs at the message (in post) adamshreves Linux - General 5 10-30-2003 02:44 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:42 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration