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Old 07-19-2010, 07:02 PM   #1
genogebot
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Disable password masking?


Is there any way to disable password masking in Linux - specifically Linux Mint 9?

Ideally I'd like to be able to choose whether to mask or unmask password fields on-the-fly, as is possible when entering passphrases in TrueCrypt.

Sometimes masking is useful (say, on a laptop in public), but often it's totally unnecessary - there's no-one looking at the screen but me, so there's no point to it.
 
Old 07-19-2010, 07:26 PM   #2
paulsm4
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Hi -

Just look at the source for "passwd" and modify as needed

"Where's the source?", you might ask. Just try Google Source (aka "CodeSearch"):

http://www.google.com/codesearch

Just type in "passwd", and that should take you here (just one of several options, all pretty clean and easy-to-follow).

Enjoy .. PSM
 
Old 07-19-2010, 07:31 PM   #3
genogebot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsm4 View Post
Hi -

Just look at the source for "passwd" and modify as needed

"Where's the source?", you might ask. Just try Google Source (aka "CodeSearch"):

http://www.google.com/codesearch

Just type in "passwd", and that should take you here (just one of several options, all pretty clean and easy-to-follow).

Enjoy .. PSM
So that's a 'no' then? For people not interested in programming, I mean.
 
Old 07-19-2010, 08:45 PM   #4
justnight
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I think it can be implemented, maybe the password thread just receive input and print * instead of echo back, so the change maybe is small. I guess.
 
Old 07-20-2010, 01:46 AM   #5
Wim Sturkenboom
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What's the problem with not seeing it? The length of the password on the machine that I'm typing this from is 26 characters and I hardly ever mistype it.
 
Old 07-20-2010, 01:50 AM   #6
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wim Sturkenboom View Post
What's the problem with not seeing it? The length of the password on the machine that I'm typing this from is 26 characters and I hardly ever mistype it.
Code:
abcdefg...
;D



Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 07-20-2010, 01:51 AM   #7
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genogebot View Post
Is there any way to disable password masking in Linux - specifically Linux Mint 9?

Ideally I'd like to be able to choose whether to mask or unmask password fields on-the-fly, as is possible when entering passphrases in TrueCrypt.

Sometimes masking is useful (say, on a laptop in public), but often it's totally unnecessary - there's no-one looking at the screen but me, so there's no point to it.
There is no generic "the password entry field for Linux" to
begin with, it's all application dependent.


Cheers,
Tink

Last edited by Tinkster; 07-20-2010 at 01:53 AM.
 
Old 07-20-2010, 02:11 AM   #8
genogebot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wim Sturkenboom View Post
What's the problem with not seeing it? The length of the password on the machine that I'm typing this from is 26 characters and I hardly ever mistype it.
Good for you.

I ask 'How can I do what I want?' and you say 'You shouldn't want that.'

That doesn't help me.

Last edited by genogebot; 07-20-2010 at 02:13 AM.
 
Old 07-20-2010, 02:20 AM   #9
genogebot
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Quote:
There is no generic "the password entry field for Linux" to
begin with, it's all application dependent.
Damn. That sounds like a definite 'no' then. In fact, it sounds like a 'NOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!'
 
Old 07-20-2010, 05:36 AM   #10
Wim Sturkenboom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinkster View Post
Code:
abcdefg...
;D
Sh.t, I have to change it. Will use 26 backspace characters (alt something) on this windows box; you will never guess that one

Quote:
Originally Posted by genogebot View Post
I ask 'How can I do what I want?' and you say 'You shouldn't want that.'
I'm just curious why you want that. It does not help if you have multiple passwords for different accounts, because you might take the wrong one anyway. If you (think that) made a typo mistake, just wipe the whole thing and start typing again.
So just curious.
 
Old 07-20-2010, 11:36 AM   #11
paulsm4
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Quote:
So that's a 'no' then? For people not interested in programming, I mean.
It's a "no", I guess, for people not interested in a *solution*.

If you just want somebody to peel your grapes, chew your food, and wipe your behind ... good luck . But if you're interested in how it works (which is essential for figuring out how to change it), I encourage you to at least LOOK at the code. Even for a non-programmer, most of it should be pretty self-explanatory.

If in doubt, post questions. That's what we're here for

IMHO .. PSM
 
Old 07-20-2010, 05:37 PM   #12
genogebot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsm4 View Post
It's a "no", I guess, for people not interested in a *solution*.

If you just want somebody to peel your grapes, chew your food, and wipe your behind ... good luck . But if you're interested in how it works (which is essential for figuring out how to change it), I encourage you to at least LOOK at the code. Even for a non-programmer, most of it should be pretty self-explanatory.

If in doubt, post questions. That's what we're here for

IMHO .. PSM
I was hoping there would be a simple system configuration option to disable password masking, or an addon available. Apparently not, but I don't think it was an unreasonable question.

As to the code, I have neither the time nor the inclination to delve into it. If you like doing that, fine, go for it, enjoy. But to suggest that people who don't do so are basically lazy is, I think, unrealistic and overly critical.

I want an operating system to use, to get things done, not to tinker with. To suggest that that is somehow wrong does not help those who want to promote linux as a desktop operating system for average users.
 
Old 07-21-2010, 06:32 AM   #13
chrism01
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The key is Tinkster's post #7; every service/app can (and often does) do its own passwd 'masking' ....
 
  


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