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Old 06-15-2016, 09:56 AM   #1
jimyoung
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can't install xrdp on debian 8.5


when i do the command apt-get install xrdp i get this message.. i am new at alway done windows i thank anyone who can give me help.
jim@Server1:~$ apt-get install xrdp
E: Could not open lock file /var/lib/dpkg/lock - open (13: Permission denied)
E: Unable to lock the administration directory (/var/lib/dpkg/), are you root?
 
Old 06-15-2016, 11:08 AM   #2
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimyoung View Post
when i do the command apt-get install xrdp i get this message.. i am new at alway done windows i thank anyone who can give me help.
jim@Server1:~$apt-get install xrdp
E: Could not open lock file /var/lib/dpkg/lock - open (13: Permission denied)
E: Unable to lock the administration directory (/var/lib/dpkg/), are you root?
Hi...

Welcome to the forum

You need administrative privileges to execute your command. To do this, place the word "sudo" in front of the command....

Code:
sudo apt-get install xrdp
Disclaimer: Be careful with commands including "su" or "sudo" especially, as it will essentially allow root access to your system. Mistakes could possibly damage or even destroy your OS.

Regards...

Last edited by ardvark71; 06-15-2016 at 11:47 AM. Reason: Correction/Removed link.
 
Old 06-15-2016, 11:12 AM   #3
jimyoung
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xrdp tried that got this

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardvark71 View Post
Hi...

Welcome to the forum

You need administrative privileges to execute your command. To do this, place the word "sudo" in front of the command....

Code:
sudo apt-get install xrdp
Disclaimer: Be careful with commands including "su" or "sudo" especially, as it will essentially allow root access to your system. Mistakes could possibly damage or even destroy your OS.

Regards...
jim@Server1:~$ sudo apt-get install xrdp
bash: sudo: command not found
 
Old 06-15-2016, 11:15 AM   #4
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimyoung View Post
jim@Server1:~$ sudo apt-get install xrdp
bash: sudo: command not found
Hi...

Do the instructions here help?

Or how about...

Code:
su apt-get install xrdp


EDIT: Whoops, thanks guys. I didn't realize Debian was different in this respect. My apologies to the OP.

Regards...

Last edited by ardvark71; 06-15-2016 at 11:35 AM. Reason: Added idea/Changed link/Correction.
 
Old 06-15-2016, 11:22 AM   #5
Emerson
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Gain root privileges with
Code:
su -
then execute your command.
 
Old 06-15-2016, 11:22 AM   #6
suicidaleggroll
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Debian doesn't use sudo for administration, that's just Ubuntu and its derivatives.

System administration needs to be done as root. When you installed Debian you set up a root password in addition to your regular user password. Use "su -" to switch to root, enter root's password, and then you can run apt-get and any other admin utilities as necessary.

Do not follow the instructions in the link posted by ardvark71 unless you want to compromise the security of your system. Sudo can be a powerful and useful tool, but it is not designed and should not be used to make a regular user the equivalent of root.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 06-15-2016 at 11:25 AM.
 
Old 06-15-2016, 11:27 AM   #7
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
Do not follow the instructions in the link posted by ardvark71 unless you want to compromise the security of your system. Sudo can be a powerful and useful tool, but it is not designed and should not be used to make a regular user the equivalent of root.
Hi...

Then why is it ok to use for Ubuntu and its derivatives?

Regards...
 
Old 06-15-2016, 11:32 AM   #8
suicidaleggroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardvark71 View Post
Hi...

Then why is it ok to use for Ubuntu and its derivatives?

Regards...
In mine and many others' opinions, it's not. The first thing I do when I set up any of those systems is enable the root account and disable that stupid unlimited sudo nonsense. All of the protections that are put in place to restrict access to the root account (and there are a lot...no GUI access, no SSH access, etc) are completely voided when a regular user is granted unlimited sudo privileges.

Canonical did it to make Linux more "Windows-like", they didn't do it for security. If you notice, Canonical has also stripped EVERY reference to the word "Linux" from their website so they can pretend to be something different, all while compromising security and adding spyware right into the DE.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 06-15-2016 at 11:39 AM. Reason: typo
 
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Old 06-15-2016, 11:43 AM   #9
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
In mine and many others' opinions, it's not. The first thing I do when I set up any of those systems is enable the root account and disable that stupid unlimited sudo nonsense. All of the protections that are put in place to restrict access to the root account (and there are a lot...no GUI access, no SSH access, etc) are completely voided when a regular user is granted unlimited sudo privileges.

Canonical did it to make Linux more "Windows-like", they didn't do it for security. If you notice, Canonical has also stripped EVERY reference to the word "Linux" from their website so they can pretend to be something different, all while compromising security and adding spyware right into the DE.
Hi...

Thank you for the explanation, although I honestly don't see the difference between the two in terms of the system rights given.

EDIT: Never mind the last part, I think I get the essence of what you're saying, at least in part...

Quote:
All of the protections that are put in place to restrict access to the root account (and there are a lot...no GUI access, no SSH access, etc) are completely voided when a regular user is granted unlimited sudo privileges.
Regards...

Last edited by ardvark71; 06-15-2016 at 11:55 AM. Reason: Added additional thought.
 
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Old 06-15-2016, 11:46 AM   #10
erik2282
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
In mine and many others' opinions, it's not. The first thing I do when I set up any of those systems is enable the root account and disable that stupid unlimited sudo nonsense. All of the protections that are put in place to restrict access to the root account (and there are a lot...no GUI access, no SSH access, etc) are completely voided when a regular user is granted unlimited sudo privileges.

Canonical did it to make Linux more "Windows-like", they didn't do it for security. If you notice, Canonical has also stripped EVERY reference to the word "Linux" from their website so they can pretend to be something different, all while compromising security and adding spyware right into the DE.
I just installed Linux Lite 3.0 on my laptop that's had debian stable for years. I found this odd that when updating through the gui update application i kept putting my root password and kept failing. I put in my user password that worked, . Anyway I want to disable the sudo stuff as well.
 
Old 06-15-2016, 12:02 PM   #11
suicidaleggroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erik2282 View Post
I just installed Linux Lite 3.0 on my laptop that's had debian stable for years. I found this odd that when updating through the gui update application i kept putting my root password and kept failing. I put in my user password that worked, . Anyway I want to disable the sudo stuff as well.
To disable it you simply need to comment out the line in /etc/sudoers that's granting "admins" the ability to do anything they want. On ubuntu and friends it looks like:
Code:
# Allow members of group sudo to execute any command
%sudo    ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL
Just make sure the root account is active before doing so or you'll lock yourself out of your own system.

You can still use sudo as it was intended, by adding rules in /etc/sudoers to allow SPECIFIC users to run SPECIFIC tasks, this just removes the all-encompassing Windows style rule that turns any user in the "sudo" group into another root.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 06-15-2016 at 12:05 PM.
 
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Old 06-15-2016, 12:11 PM   #12
erik2282
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Thanks suicidaleggroll.
 
Old 06-15-2016, 12:36 PM   #13
jimyoung
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xrdp thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardvark71 View Post
Hi...

Do the instructions here help?

Or how about...

Code:
su apt-get install xrdp


EDIT: Whoops, thanks guys. I didn't realize Debian was different in this respect. My apologies to the OP.

Regards...
Thanks for the help it seems to be ok
 
Old 06-15-2016, 01:13 PM   #14
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimyoung View Post
Thanks for the help it seems to be ok
Hi...

You're welcome, were you able to get it to install? If so, please mark this thread as "SOLVED" by clicking on "Thread Tools" directly above your initial post. Thanks!

Regards...

Last edited by ardvark71; 06-15-2016 at 06:31 PM. Reason: Added information.
 
Old 06-16-2016, 08:13 AM   #15
jimyoung
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Smile xrdp

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardvark71 View Post
Hi...

You're welcome, were you able to get it to install? If so, please mark this thread as "SOLVED" by clicking on "Thread Tools" directly above your initial post. Thanks!

Regards...
Yes just got to figure it out now. but it did install like you said i thank you i am trying to learn
 
  


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