LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 09-24-2012, 09:22 PM   #1
AHVincent
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2012
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Anything like Hotkeyz for Linux?


With hotkeys I could lauch applicatinos with Windows+shortcut keys, for example:

Windows Key + Delete = Lauch Filezilla

Anything like this for Linux Mint 13?

Thanks
 
Old 09-24-2012, 09:27 PM   #2
suicidaleggroll
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: Colorado
Distribution: OpenSUSE, CentOS
Posts: 5,258

Rep: Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947Reputation: 1947
Yes, it should have it built in. I don't use Mint, but in one of the menus you should find a section for keyboard shortcuts. Otherwise you can use xbindkeys to set up any keyboard shortcut your heart desires.
 
Old 09-24-2012, 09:31 PM   #3
amani
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Kolkata, India
Distribution: Debian 64-bit GNU/Linux, Kubuntu64, Fedora QA, Slackware,
Posts: 2,766

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
global and application specific shortcuts can be configured via system settings in KDE

There are default ones too.

http://forum.kde.org/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=97099

But easier way would be to use bash/zsh with auto-completion or alt-F2.
 
Old 09-24-2012, 09:39 PM   #4
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mint, OpenBSD
Posts: 11,328
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727
I have Mint with MATE on one machine. Go to Control Center-->Keyboard shortcuts or Applications-->Preferences-->Keyboard Shortcuts. (I have not used all the desktops that Mint offers; the path may be slightly different with different desktops.)

I found a video on how to set them up here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_r788q1A8g

Warning, the user has succumbed to Google's song and is attempting to "monetize" the video; there may be a short video at the beginning.
 
Old 09-24-2012, 09:59 PM   #5
AHVincent
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2012
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I looked at the video but what are the command lines? For example, what command line would be for Firefox portable on desktop?
 
Old 09-24-2012, 10:27 PM   #6
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mint, OpenBSD
Posts: 11,328
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727Reputation: 2727
The commands for various applications are generally fairly straightforward.

The directories where executable files are stored are usually in your path, so the command for Firefox is firefox, because the system will find it in your path. (If it were not in your path, the command would be /path-to-some/directory/firefox.)

The easiest way for someone new to Linux to find the commands for applications is to look in the menu editor for the distro he or she is using. In Mint, you can point the mouse at the Menu item on the taskbar, right-click, and select "Edit."

There are other ways, such as looking at the contents of /usr/bin and /usr/local/bin for applications, then starting them from the command line to verify that they are the commands you are looking for. You can also use the command line with find, locate, and whereis (example: whereis firefox). I prefer whereis to find applications, because it looks for executables; in contrast, locate will return everything regarding the query, including configuration files, libraries, hidden files; run whereis firefox, then run locate firefox and compare the outputs.

See the man pages for each of these commands to learn more (for example, from the command line, man whereis will display the manual page for whereis.

Hope this helps.

Last edited by frankbell; 09-24-2012 at 10:29 PM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:38 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration