LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 01-26-2002, 12:44 AM   #1
psyklops
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles
Distribution: RedHat 9.0
Posts: 216

Rep: Reputation: 30
Good book on UNIX commands


Any suggestions on this?
 
Old 01-26-2002, 01:43 AM   #2
DMR
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2001
Location: Fairfax, California
Distribution: RH 9.0, RH 7.3, Mandrake 8.0
Posts: 986

Rep: Reputation: 30
I haven't run across a reference which addresses all of the subtlties between the different *NIX flavors in a purely command-by-command, dictionary-type layout, but I have two which I use quite often:

UNIX Power Tools from O'Reilly Press is a very good overall *NIX reference. It's much more than just a command reference though, and isn't Linux-specific. The downside is that the actual commands and their usage aren't categorized in an alphabetical sort of way, but are more grouped according to their functionality. However, I'd still highly suggest it for any *NIX user.

Another is Linux System Commands published by M&T. Although Linux-specific, it is a command reference and nothing more. I've haven't found their books easy to navigate though, as they all seem to lack an intuitive structure (i.e.: evreything might be there, just not quite where you would expect to find it).

Sorry if this sounds like a not-so-glowing review of either, but I'd go for UNIX Power Tools in terms of a general (read: non-Linux-specific) UNIX reference book.

Last edited by DMR; 01-26-2002 at 01:45 AM.
 
Old 01-26-2002, 02:12 AM   #3
trickykid
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2001
Posts: 24,133

Rep: Reputation: 199Reputation: 199
I just picked up Unix Shells by Example Third Edition. It covers all the basic Unix shells with good examples of each, including the korn shell and even bash for Linux. I find it very good so far in covering the shells and their commands along with some shell scripting.. might be a good source for you to check out. I give it two thumbs up.
 
Old 01-26-2002, 07:10 PM   #4
psyklops
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles
Distribution: RedHat 9.0
Posts: 216

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
I might not have asked the question properly? Im using Mandy8.1 who's kernel is a unix clone which I would think would mean something very similar to unix. However when searching for a book on linux commands I find books delinating between both of them when in fact one is supposed to be a clone of the other. My question is, I bought "Linux in a Nutshell" by O'Reilly which gives all commands, arguements, shell explanations and a bunch of other goodies, however will this apply to an os based on unix such as BSD even though the book is about linux...? Or should I have bought UNIX in a nutshell which would be a cross reference to both. They seem like they would say the same thing....

Last edited by psyklops; 01-26-2002 at 07:18 PM.
 
Old 01-26-2002, 07:20 PM   #5
TacKat
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2002
Distribution: LFS
Posts: 90

Rep: Reputation: 15
Most of the Unix-clones are very similar to each other commandwise, considering that they are all clones of the same system. The real differences come in the way the system is laid out, how it boots, and so on. Doing an 'ls' on just about any *nix will give you a list of the files and directories - somethings just don't change much.
 
Old 01-26-2002, 07:23 PM   #6
trickykid
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2001
Posts: 24,133

Rep: Reputation: 199Reputation: 199
well if your using Linux, a Linux in a Nutshell would be best. Even though a Unix book will do the job just as well in covering commands, the default kernel shell for Linux is bash, most likely that is what your using, you could pick up a book about bash. I think O'reily has a book covering it. But the book you have will cover bash.
The book I mentioned earlier covers all the major shells with commands that *nix uses.
 
Old 01-26-2002, 08:59 PM   #7
psyklops
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2002
Location: Los Angeles
Distribution: RedHat 9.0
Posts: 216

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Thanks guys I think Ill stick with the book I bought!
 
Old 01-26-2002, 09:30 PM   #8
DMR
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2001
Location: Fairfax, California
Distribution: RH 9.0, RH 7.3, Mandrake 8.0
Posts: 986

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally posted by psyklops
I might not have asked the question properly? Im using Mandy8.1 who's kernel is a unix clone which I would think would mean something very similar to unix. However when searching for a book on linux commands I find books delinating between both of them when in fact one is supposed to be a clone of the other. My question is, I bought "Linux in a Nutshell" by O'Reilly which gives all commands, arguements, shell explanations and a bunch of other goodies, however will this apply to an os based on unix such as BSD even though the book is about linux...? Or should I have bought UNIX in a nutshell which would be a cross reference to both. They seem like they would say the same thing....
Clone probably isn't the best word to to use when talking about UNIX derivatives. The word variant is often used, and IMHO is a better decriptive.

There are a scores of UNIX variants in the family tree; many of them long obsolete, many still in use. Linux came from the desire to improve on Minix, itself a "lightweight" UNIX offshoot spawned in the early 80's. Given that these *NIXes were developed as improvements to the original or as solution-specific implementations of it, it's no surprise that that there are some (often quirky, subtle, or just plain frustrating) differences between them. Remeber that even the different DOSes that used to floate around (IBM-DOS, DR-DOS, MS-DOS, etc.) suffered from the same problems in terms of subtle differences in commands, syntax, etc.

If you're interested, there's a mind-blowing timeline of the "UNIX Family Tree" available here.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need good Linux or Unix INTRO book (command line focused) Ethan Linux - General 7 01-09-2007 01:24 AM
unix programming book - old edition arunswarup Linux - General 5 09-21-2005 10:33 PM
Good unix book/site for the new? martinj Solaris / OpenSolaris 6 06-19-2005 07:03 AM
Unix Book for Beginners (Not Linux... Unix) suse2166 General 6 11-25-2004 12:46 PM
Any good unix systems programming book? saiz66 Programming 7 10-04-2004 08:16 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:10 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration