LinuxQuestions.org
Support LQ: Use code LQ3 and save $3 on Domain Registration
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 09-07-2003, 08:33 PM   #1
sketch7
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Posts: 5

Rep: Reputation: 0
Question Copying large files to FAT32


I've currently been recording video from TV tuner in Linux and I've wanted to move some of it from my ext2 partition to my Windows FAT32 partition. However, when I do a 'cp filename.avi /mnt/drived' I get a message saying "cannot create regular file 'filename.avi' : Invalid argument. My FAT32 partition is setup for reading and writing and I can copy smaller files to it. The files I'm transferrring are 900MB or greater in size. Is there some sort of filesize limit in place? Do I need to do it another way?
 
Old 09-07-2003, 10:18 PM   #2
joseph
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Batam
Distribution: Ubuntu 10 And Linux Mint
Posts: 414

Rep: Reputation: 30
you said that you wanted to move some file not to copy some file, right?

how about mv filename.avi /mnt/drived/, have you tried this command?
 
Old 09-07-2003, 11:12 PM   #3
TheRealDeal
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Central Coast, NSW, Australia
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 438

Rep: Reputation: 30
That's really weird. I copy files from my ext3 to fat32 drives each day. The files I'm copying are up to 2GB in size. Most of the time around 1.2GB single files.

>Craig
 
Old 09-08-2003, 09:40 AM   #4
sketch7
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Posts: 5

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I've tried the mv command as well but it gets the same error message.
 
Old 09-08-2003, 10:05 AM   #5
michaelk
Moderator
 
Registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 11,850

Rep: Reputation: 736Reputation: 736Reputation: 736Reputation: 736Reputation: 736Reputation: 736Reputation: 736
What distro are you using?
 
Old 09-08-2003, 08:26 PM   #6
sketch7
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Posts: 5

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I'm using Slackware 8.1. This is what my /etc/fstab looks like.

/dev/hda6 swap swap defaults 0 0
/dev/hda7 / ext2 defaults 1 1
/dev/hda8 /home ext2 defaults 1 2
/dev/hda1 /mnt/winc vfat defaults,user,umask=000 1 0
/dev/hda5 /mnt/wind vfat defaults,user,umask=000 1 0
/dev/hdb /mnt/dvd iso9660 defaults,noauto,user,ro 0 0
/dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom iso9660 defaults,noauto,user,ro 0 0
/dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy auto noauto,owner 0 0
none /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
none /proc proc defaults 0 0
 
Old 09-09-2003, 03:42 AM   #7
Electro
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2002
Posts: 6,042

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Type cp filename.avi /mnt/wind/.

Yes, include the period to save on typing.

BTW, you need to be in the directory where filename.avi is located.
 
Old 09-10-2003, 12:23 PM   #8
sketch7
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Posts: 5

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Tried it, still gives the same error. Unable to create regular file , invalid argument.
 
Old 10-21-2007, 04:57 PM   #9
des_a
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Posts: 290

Rep: Reputation: 18
It seems I'm experiencing a similar problem too. I recently reformated one external hard drive as EXT3. I've been storing stuff on it. I store backup and data on it. I've got another FAT32 drive containing data.
I wanted to copy a file to the FAT32 drive from the EXT3 drive. I'm reading it with the driver for Windows allowing access. It won't let that happen because the file is at least 4GB. I store 4GB or bigger files on the external FAT32 drive all the time. However, it won't let me copy or move files that are at least 4GB from the EXT3 drive to the FAT32 drive. This is so strange.
I'm thinking I'm going to try converting the FAT32 drive to NTFS and try it that way. Right now, I'm moving the information from the FAT32 drive to the EXT3 drive because that is the only other drive I've got that's big enough for it. Then I'll have to reformat the drive as NTFS, and then try moving stuff back to it. If not, then I'll have to turn it to EXT3 or something similar.
The intened use of the EXT3 drive is for a Linux server, once it's loaded. The intened use of the data drive, is data shared between Linux and Windows as nessassary, on the client machine.
I've looked it up, and it looks like it's a known problem. Windows complains that the disk is full, even though it contridicts itself and proves it's not by checking the free space. This was the solution that I found on sites, that might work. This is certainly a weird problem.
My reason for changing one drive to EXT3 was because I'm going to need user specific permissions for it later. I don't want someone going in and using stuff that's not theres, once it's loaded and placed on the server. However, the only OS I've got that can load the stuff and know it's loaded right is Windows, and that's because I need to check and execute a bunch of programs that are Windows programs.
Maybe in your case you can try the same thing. Maybe it'll work. They did say that Linux is capable of reading NTFS nowdays. That reason is the only reason I've never used NTFS for data partitions. If that barrier is down, then I can use NTFS for every new data partition, and use FAT32 for every old data partition.
Now, if that doesn't work in your case, maybe I've got one other idea, even though it's more complicated.
What if you did this? Create an NTFS partition for data that you need to read in Windows and Linux. Then create a FAT32 partiton in Windows. Then create an EXT3 partiton in Linux. Always create the information (DATA) on the FAT32 partiton. Then, move Linux information to EXT3, and move Windows information to NTFS. Always use the OS that natively supports it to write the data, but read it with whichever, given the proper drivers. I don't know if this is possible, but it's one possible solution, maybe. Maybe in my case too.
 
Old 10-21-2007, 05:20 PM   #10
saikee
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne UK
Distribution: Any free distro.
Posts: 3,398
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 112Reputation: 112
The fat32 filing system has a ceiling limit that no single file can be larger than 4Gb. There are tons of information on this. Here is just one.
 
Old 10-22-2007, 04:34 AM   #11
Electro
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2002
Posts: 6,042

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by des_a
It seems I'm experiencing a similar problem too. I recently reformated one external hard drive as EXT3. I've been storing stuff on it. I store backup and data on it. I've got another FAT32 drive containing data.
I wanted to copy a file to the FAT32 drive from the EXT3 drive. I'm reading it with the driver for Windows allowing access. It won't let that happen because the file is at least 4GB. I store 4GB or bigger files on the external FAT32 drive all the time. However, it won't let me copy or move files that are at least 4GB from the EXT3 drive to the FAT32 drive. This is so strange.
I'm thinking I'm going to try converting the FAT32 drive to NTFS and try it that way. Right now, I'm moving the information from the FAT32 drive to the EXT3 drive because that is the only other drive I've got that's big enough for it. Then I'll have to reformat the drive as NTFS, and then try moving stuff back to it. If not, then I'll have to turn it to EXT3 or something similar.
The intened use of the EXT3 drive is for a Linux server, once it's loaded. The intened use of the data drive, is data shared between Linux and Windows as nessassary, on the client machine.
I've looked it up, and it looks like it's a known problem. Windows complains that the disk is full, even though it contridicts itself and proves it's not by checking the free space. This was the solution that I found on sites, that might work. This is certainly a weird problem.
My reason for changing one drive to EXT3 was because I'm going to need user specific permissions for it later. I don't want someone going in and using stuff that's not theres, once it's loaded and placed on the server. However, the only OS I've got that can load the stuff and know it's loaded right is Windows, and that's because I need to check and execute a bunch of programs that are Windows programs.
Maybe in your case you can try the same thing. Maybe it'll work. They did say that Linux is capable of reading NTFS nowdays. That reason is the only reason I've never used NTFS for data partitions. If that barrier is down, then I can use NTFS for every new data partition, and use FAT32 for every old data partition.
Now, if that doesn't work in your case, maybe I've got one other idea, even though it's more complicated.
What if you did this? Create an NTFS partition for data that you need to read in Windows and Linux. Then create a FAT32 partiton in Windows. Then create an EXT3 partiton in Linux. Always create the information (DATA) on the FAT32 partiton. Then, move Linux information to EXT3, and move Windows information to NTFS. Always use the OS that natively supports it to write the data, but read it with whichever, given the proper drivers. I don't know if this is possible, but it's one possible solution, maybe. Maybe in my case too.
FAT32 has a file size limit of 4 GB. If the size is more than 4 GB, it will not work. What is strange, you are able to store a file that is bigger than 4 GB. It seems to me you have a hardware error that is screwing up the operations.

Linux is able to read NTFS, but the reliability of writing is very questioning. The linux-ntfs project tries their best to provide a reliable way of writing to NTFS. I recommend using it only if you have to. I tested it with 600 MB files and worked in a reliable manner, but I do not know how it will do over long periods of time.

I recommend FAT32 if you are dual booting from Windows to Linux. I am using it just fine and no problems from using it all these years.

If you need large file support (greater than 4 GB) and you are dual booting between Windows and Linux, I suggest install EXT2 IFS for Windows 2000/XP. Read and write support should be reliable and stable enough. There is no journaling, so be careful and backup often.

BTW, this is a four year old thread that you brought up. I suggest next time make another thread.
 
Old 10-22-2007, 10:13 AM   #12
des_a
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Posts: 290

Rep: Reputation: 18
I'll see how that works out then. I didn't know it was a 4 year old thread! Oops! Good to know though. I just came accross it when searching.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Problem copying large amount of files from IDE external case in Fedora C4 TruthSeeker Linux - Newbie 8 10-26-2005 02:04 AM
Knoppix: copying files from NTFS to FAT32 Manhhh Linux - Newbie 6 08-25-2005 03:21 PM
Samba hangs up at copying many large files ogcu Linux - Networking 1 05-19-2004 01:29 AM
Large copying to windows share failing... jair666 Linux - Newbie 1 04-19-2004 09:02 AM
Error copying large files from cdrom patrickyeo Linux - Hardware 1 11-03-2002 06:46 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:36 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration