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Old 06-24-2017, 08:20 PM   #31
bsdunixdb
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2009
Location: London, United Kingdom
Distribution: Slackware-x86_64+multilib (stable)
Posts: 47

Rep: Reputation: 17

Whether as a server or desktop, Slackware just works. KISS principles at their best.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 06-24-2017, 08:40 PM   #32
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mageia, and whatever VMs I happen to be playing with
Posts: 12,152
Blog Entries: 14

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To quote something I read somewhere, "Slackware always works, and it never breaks." Though I must confess, I broke it once (but I fixed it too!).
 
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Old 06-24-2017, 09:26 PM   #33
Moonshiner54
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2007
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1
Cool My first Linux

I started with Slackware in November 1995. I set it up using Windows for Workgroups 3.11 to get to bulletin boards and such! Figured out how to use PPP and everything associated with it. I am a Software Engineer with 3 years left to retirement.
I used Digital VMS systems and loved command line. My first computer was a VIC-20; the Commador 64 came out a couple weeks later so I didn't buy another computer until I bought a 486. I put Slackware on it within a couple months and totally removed Windows. (I have a strong dislike of M$ and its products to say the least!) I have played with different distros but like others have usually had Slack machine sitting somewhere. I was using Kunbuntu until they updated grub and totally messed me up! I know I could have replaced the offending file but was totally tired of the constant updating. It is Linux and should not need constant updating. To me that is a sign of poor coding.
Anyway, back with Slack on my main machine and it will never leave again.
Long Live Slackware!
Mooshiner54
 
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Old 06-24-2017, 10:48 PM   #34
Quicken2k
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Registered: Mar 2009
Posts: 48

Rep: Reputation: 2
I use it because it is easy to use, stable, not as much as a headache as Gentoo. I can find the software I need or compile it. My most important reason for using it however is it has nothing to with SYSTEMD!.
 
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Old 06-25-2017, 01:53 AM   #35
kikinovak
MLED Founder
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Montpezat (South France)
Distribution: Slackware, CentOS, FreeBSD
Posts: 3,311

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Slackware is a great system for teaching Linux. My new book about Linux basics is entirely based on Slackware 14.2.

Cheers from the sunny South of France,

Niki
 
4 members found this post helpful.
Old 06-25-2017, 11:56 AM   #36
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,714
Blog Entries: 27

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Member response

Hi,

Slackware is stable & easy to use for a knowledgeable user. I started with PV's first release and never looked at anything else since I did want a UNIX-like OS and Slackware provided that for me. I used Slackware within the LAB and found the reliability there. Tools available for development to create the control/interface of various LAB equipment.

Early releases were on Floppy disk sets with boxes of floppies to get the download complete. Our University had Thick Ethernet at the time and I would get my student aids to do my downloads. Their costs per hour were a lot cheaper than using my time. Let them do downloads an write the floppies. My first personal server used Slackware. Don't get me wrong, I loved UNIX but a license off campus was expensive so Slackware met my needs.

To date, I do use other Gnu/Linux for diagnostic work or experimentation. Since my retirement, I use Slackware within my personal LAB to keep my mind sharp and tuned to provide interfaces that I build for various sensors. Love to keep up to date but some of the hardware that I wish for is just too expensive. At the University LAB I would purchase hardware via my LAB budget to provide Bench experiments for student LABs. So I would have many types of hardware to experiment with that I could not personally afford.

We were granted several pieces of equipment that we would develop LAB interfaces and control to acquire experimental data then post process or Live process via multitask on LAB built PC hardware.

I have been working with ARM lately and find that platform would be great for instrumentation and computer analysis. SlackwareARM and other Gnu/Linux would fit perfectly. DAS would be cheaper as compared to a Nicolet. Not that I would like to build a Spectrometer or scope interface but I sure could build a User device to interface with a Nicolet DAS or even Spectrophotometers to allow a remote experimental data acquisition or even a User device to interface with Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). At the time of using LDV we would build our User interface using a PC but the ARM of today would be the way to acquire data for that experimental setup for the wind tunnel models. Things have changed in a few short years and will continue to improve as Slackware grows and provides the means for stable equipment experimentation. I could use some shields with new ARM boards to provide GPIO, DAC and ADC for control and collection of experimental data and process that same data. Process and collection could be simplified using a good OS like SlackwareARM along with tools with new ARM devices with proper sensor interface devices.

So I use Slackware every day and will continue to use it. Thanks to PV and team for a great Gnu/Linux that is very useful to me over the many years.

Slackware on everyone!

Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy!
 
3 members found this post helpful.
Old 06-25-2017, 06:54 PM   #37
slackb0t
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: Slackware64-current on Thinkpad Carbon X1
Posts: 212

Rep: Reputation: 42
Oh god.. I didn't read any other posts. Let me sum it up.

I use Slackware because it doesn't suck /end
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old Yesterday, 12:07 AM   #38
1337_powerslacker
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2009
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 493
Blog Entries: 1

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 175Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by slackb0t View Post
Oh god.. I didn't read any other posts. Let me sum it up.

I use Slackware because it doesn't suck /end

Well said. It really comes down to one thing: when you want something done right, do it yourself. That, ultimately, is what Slackware is all about; administering your computer, your way. Would we really want it any other way?
 
  


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