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Old 12-30-2009, 01:24 PM   #1
izghitu
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start up script


Hi,

I have Ubuntu 9.10

I want to set up a start up script that is executed last when the server boots and asks for user input/performs some tasks.

I've added the script to /etc/init.d/local and made it executable using:
update-rc.d local defaults 80

When the server boots, I do not see anything on the screen and no user input is requested although the script is executed.

If I add a reboot to the script to the end of the file after user input requests, the server is rebooted regardless of the "read" commands.

Am I doing something wrong?

Please help

Thanks
 
Old 12-30-2009, 04:15 PM   #2
blackhole54
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I've never tried this but I am guessing the script is not connected to any terminal. In that case the read command would generate an error and the script would continue executing (which is consistent with what you report about the reboot command).

Assuming at that point in the boot the display is /dev/tty1, you could try redirecting I/O using an exec command at the beginning of the script:

Code:
exec > /dev/tty1 2>&1 < /dev/tty1

Just as a general comment about troubleshooting situations like this where you can't directly observe the script, I sometimes find it useful to redirect stderr to a file and enable tracing (removing those commands after I have it working). Then I can check the file after the fact to see what happened:

Code:
exec 2> /tmp/somefilename
set -x

ONE CAVEAT: The last I checked, Ubuntu used dash (instead of bash) for /bin/sh. I just checked the man page and I think the above will work in dash but am not absolutely certain. If not, you could (if you haven't already) specify /bin/bash instead of /bin/sh for your script.
 
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Old 12-31-2009, 02:40 AM   #3
konsolebox
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also be careful when using exec.. with that you could replace the process of the shell with the command and when the command finishes, it's the end of the line.
 
Old 12-31-2009, 02:46 PM   #4
blackhole54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by konsolebox View Post
also be careful when using exec.. with that you could replace the process of the shell with the command and when the command finishes, it's the end of the line.
Absolutely. The form of the exec command I showed doesn't have a target command so it just redirects input and output for the current shell.
 
Old 01-01-2010, 05:36 AM   #5
konsolebox
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blackhole54 View Post
Absolutely. The form of the exec command I showed doesn't have a target command so it just redirects input and output for the current shell.
Sorry I forgot to quote. I wasn't really referring to your post. Obviously exec can also be used that way... But the OP mentioned that some parts of the script did not ask for user input so I thought maybe he accidentally used exec to execute 1 of the commands. I got the idea when you made that post though.
 
Old 01-01-2010, 06:37 AM   #6
izghitu
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The
Code:
exec > /dev/tty1 2>&1 < /dev/tty1
thing worked

thanks a lot for your help
 
  


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