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Old 10-24-2012, 12:36 AM   #1
sulekha
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Question partition settings


Hi all,

whenever i install ubuntu using alternate install CD I will encounter this screen, can anybody explain the significance of the setting "Typical usage" ??

http://s529.photobucket.com/albums/d...n-settings.png
 
Old 10-24-2012, 01:50 AM   #2
Ztcoracat
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A mount point is essential to a partition that holds files on it.
Most folks create the mount point at the beginning of the partition and not the end of a partition.
http://www.easy-ubuntu-linux.com/ubu...on-606-12.html
 
Old 10-24-2012, 03:47 AM   #3
pixellany
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???
If I am not mistaken, a "mount point" is the node in the filesystem where another filesystem is mounted (AKA "connected"). The filesystem being mounted could be on another partition, another physical disk, USB thumb drive, etc.----or it could be a file which is an image of same.

Note that you cannot mount a partition which does not have a filesystem on it.

to the original question: I think the "typical usage = standard", simply means it's being used for regular files, as opposed to --e.g.-- a swap partition..
 
Old 10-24-2012, 06:33 AM   #4
sulekha
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
A mount point is essential to a partition that holds files on it.
Most folks create the mount point at the beginning of the partition and not the end of a partition.
http://www.easy-ubuntu-linux.com/ubu...on-606-12.html


What i am interested in is the 4th line after the line mount point

the line which states "Typical usage: standard"

Last edited by sulekha; 10-24-2012 at 06:34 AM.
 
Old 10-24-2012, 07:06 AM   #5
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany View Post

to the original question: I think the "typical usage = standard", simply means it's being used for regular files, as opposed to --e.g.-- a swap partition..
My interpretation (that is: guess) was that this would allow you specify other types of usage, such as the 'lots of small files' type of usage you might see with squid or an e-mail directory, vs the 'few big files' you might see with a media server so that it could adjust the number of inodes appropriately (or, just possibly, the use of write barriers, but that seems less likely).

Now as this is a complete guess, and I'm certainly prepared to be proved wrong (and learn from that): to that end, can you have a look at what other options there are other than 'typical usage', because then we should be able to be definitive about what this is about, please?
 
Old 10-24-2012, 02:47 PM   #6
sulekha
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salasi View Post
My interpretation (that is: guess) was that this would allow you specify other types of usage, such as the 'lots of small files' type of usage you might see with squid or an e-mail directory, vs the 'few big files' you might see with a media server so that it could adjust the number of inodes appropriately (or, just possibly, the use of write barriers, but that seems less likely).

Now as this is a complete guess, and I'm certainly prepared to be proved wrong (and learn from that): to that end, can you have a look at what other options there are other than 'typical usage', because then we should be able to be definitive about what this is about, please?


it is something similar to what you have said. I tried a fresh install of ubuntu 12.04 using alternate cd to find out this

http://s529.photobucket.com/albums/d...t=DSCN0684.jpg
 
Old 10-25-2012, 03:46 AM   #7
salasi
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Woa, good guess, then!

Anyway, it is clear, at least at a first level, what it is doing then. Given that there is at least the theoretical possibility of running out of inodes before you run out of disk space, 'tuning' the number of inodes so that you would run out of both simultaneously (more or less) is an advantage, and what it is doing is trying to take into account anticipated usage patterns to get that balance right.

On the other hand, that thing I said about write barriers is total b*11*cks. You are using ext2 and write barriers (afaik) can't be used with ext2, but can with, eg, ext4.
 
Old 10-28-2012, 09:20 AM   #8
tommcd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sulekha View Post
What i am interested in is the 4th line after the line mount point
the line which states "Typical usage: standard"
I always install Ubuntu (well, Lubuntu in my case, but the alternate install CD is essentially the same) from the alternate install CD.
I have never worried about the "typical usage" line. I have always left it at "standard"; and I have never had a problem with it. I never really thought about it before. I have I explored any other options for partitions instead of the "typical usage" option.

A little google searching turned up this tutorial:
http://www.informit.com/articles/art...86096&seqNum=4
See table 2.1 Partition Settings on that page:
Quote:
typical usage
This option can be used to optimize how the filesystem is organized, although the standard setting is typically used.
I have not found any other explanations of what other options are offered besides the "typical usage" option. Does anyone know why or when you might choose another option besides "typical"??

Last edited by tommcd; 10-28-2012 at 09:22 AM.
 
Old 11-01-2012, 01:12 AM   #9
sulekha
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommcd View Post
I always install Ubuntu (well, Lubuntu in my case, but the alternate install CD is essentially the same) from the alternate install CD.
I have never worried about the "typical usage" line. I have always left it at "standard"; and I have never had a problem with it. I never really thought about it before. I have I explored any other options for partitions instead of the "typical usage" option.

A little google searching turned up this tutorial:
http://www.informit.com/articles/art...86096&seqNum=4
See table 2.1 Partition Settings on that page:

I have not found any other explanations of what other options are offered besides the "typical usage" option. Does anyone know why or when you might choose another option besides "typical"??

see:- https://groups.google.com/forum/?fro...up/1nkIV8B8094
 
Old 11-01-2012, 01:25 AM   #10
Ztcoracat
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What other options (besides "typical usage")are offered during the installation process?

Perhaps by evaluating the other options and what they offer (and entail) we can be able to establish the details of "typical usage" more thoroughly and know more of what it is not.
 
  


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