LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Ubuntu
User Name
Password
Ubuntu This forum is for the discussion of Ubuntu Linux.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-06-2006, 06:23 PM   #1
cosmo289
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Posts: 12

Rep: Reputation: 0
Memory Problem


OK, i got kubuntu installed thru usb on a 2.5in converter and then took out that hard drive and stuck in my HP OmniBook 900B laptop with 192mb ram. I edited grub to make root from sda1 to hda1. starts no problem. then i boot into it desktop and everything. i notice the computer to start to lag, i go into the system monitor, i notice all memory is used and like may 2mb are free. I need like a "msconfig" thing to stop most of the crap i dont even use to not startup at all.
 
Old 07-06-2006, 06:48 PM   #2
pljvaldez
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Somewhere on the String
Distribution: Debian Wheezy (x86)
Posts: 6,094

Rep: Reputation: 280Reputation: 280Reputation: 280
I think there is a resource like that. It has to do with init.d. Hmmm. Ah ha! On my Debian box, it looks like the gui package is called ksysv. sudo aptitude install ksysv if it's not already installed. You'll have to run it as the root user though.

Basically it's a gui to the update-rc.d command. You should be able to see everything being started up by listing the directory /etc/rc2.d (this is for runlevel 2, which is the debian default runlevel).

I'm surprised that a Kubuntu install is eating so much memory. My Debian install uses 57MB after it's all up and running. I'm using gdm, KDE, samba, ssh, firestarter, etc. Looks like about 25 different daemons starting at boot in my /etc/rc2.d...
 
Old 07-07-2006, 10:14 AM   #3
cosmo289
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Ok i got it installed but now i do not know where my rc.d is at all. Does anyone know where that could be located?
 
Old 07-07-2006, 11:51 AM   #4
kstan
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Malaysia, Johor
Distribution: Dual boot MacOS X/Ubuntu 9.10
Posts: 851

Rep: Reputation: 31
i use
chkconfig --level 345 daemonname off (example is mysqld)

Regards,
ks
 
Old 07-07-2006, 06:33 PM   #5
pljvaldez
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Somewhere on the String
Distribution: Debian Wheezy (x86)
Posts: 6,094

Rep: Reputation: 280Reputation: 280Reputation: 280
Sorry, but I don't understand what you're asking when you want to know where rc.d is located.

In general, the way system V startup works is that all of the daemon scripts (like apache, ftp, ssh, etc) actually live in /etc/init.d. There are just a bunch of symbolic links in /etc/rc#.d (where # is a number between 0 and 6) pointing to scripts in /etc/init.d. At boot, the kernel reads the settings for the default runlevel (2 in Debian and probably 2 in Kubuntu). So at boot, it will start all the daemons that have symbolic links in /etc/rc2.d in some particular order (which has to do with the names of the symbolic links).

So you should be able to run from a command line kdesu ksysv and it should give you a graphical representation of which programs are started in which runlevel. Basically edit the one for runlevel 2 (or rc2.d, I don't remember how ksysv labels stuff) and just remove all the services you don't want to startup.

But BE CAREFUL with what you delete as you might make your system choke at boot time (not that you can't fix it). At the very least, before you go mucking around, I'd handwrite or put in a file what symbolic links are in /etc/rc2.d before messing around. That way you can always go back and recreate them later if you need to.
 
Old 07-08-2006, 03:02 AM   #6
ErrorBound
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2006
Posts: 280

Rep: Reputation: 31
If you're used to using Windows and are just concerned with the amount of memory that Linux appears to be using, you might want to look up the differences in how the two manage the memory.
In a nutshell, Linux won't touch the swap space until all of the memory is used, and Windows will use both memory and swap well before the memory runs out. The Linux way ensures that your hardware is utilized to its maximum potential, because the memory is much, much faster than swap. The result is Linux "appearing" to be a memory hog.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Memory problem sunhui Linux - Hardware 1 02-25-2006 01:43 AM
Memory problem... lingeek Slackware 6 03-01-2005 10:30 AM
RH 9.0 Memory Problem ! ! ! Mustard010 Linux - Hardware 7 11-03-2003 09:21 PM
Out of Memory problem Gilion Linux - General 1 10-17-2003 09:20 AM
Help!?! RH 8 Memory Mapping -High Memory-Virtural Memory issues.. Merlin53 Linux - Hardware 2 06-18-2003 05:48 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Ubuntu

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:49 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration