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Old 10-12-2005, 04:27 AM   #1
Jongi
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Will repartitioning affect my current SUSE install?


Parted returns the following as my partitions:

Code:
Minor    Start       End     Type      Filesystem  Flags
1          0.031  66150.461  primary   ntfs        type=07
2      66150.461  67178.056  primary   linux-swap  type=82
3      67178.057  78159.990  primary   reiserfs    boot, type=83
1 = XP and 3 = SUSE 9.3

I will be looking to add 2 partitions, a /home (1.GB) and another reiserfs (10.GB) for FC4. I am thinking of doing this using YaST and the partition manager there. My concern is that this will change 3 to 5 and affect things like grub and the fstab file. If I do the partitioning in linux what should I change before rebooting and installing FC4?

If I use a program like Norton PartitionMagic in XP to create the partition sizes (that is unformatted partitions), I assume that 3 will move to 5 and I will not be able to access SUSE from the GRUB boot menu. But then I assume that if I install FC4 on the 10GB partition it will find SUSE and Windows and add them to the new grub so to say. I will of course back up the boot partition just in case.
 
Old 10-12-2005, 11:02 AM   #2
Keruskerfuerst
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Hello!

You should backup your important data before trying to change the size of any partitions.

Greetings
 
Old 10-13-2005, 01:27 AM   #3
Jongi
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That is a given
 
Old 10-13-2005, 03:43 AM   #4
1kyle
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After re-partitioning insert the SUSE install disk again -- go through install until you get the option Repair system -- go through the options apart from Verify packages

This will fix the fstab entries (Partition numbers will have changed and the mount points as well).
Also it will re-create the boot loader -- and then you should be able to re-boot your system with the new partitions. You shouldn't have to re-install SUSE again.

As always backup important data in any case.

Cheers

-K
 
Old 10-13-2005, 04:25 AM   #5
Jongi
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Kyle: i take it you advise going the route of the 2nd option?
 
Old 10-13-2005, 09:40 AM   #6
1kyle
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What I do is

1) First Logon to Windows
2) Backup (take an "Image Dump" of the Linux partition(s)

I use Acronis True Image for this ( http://www.acronis.com)

(Ghost or the old Power Quest Drive Image 2002 will also work for backing up partition images including Linux Partitions).

3) Re-arrange partitions with Partition Manager if I'm re-sizing Windows partitions -- I have the old Powerequest Partition Manager which doesn't re-size Linux partitions --so I just delete and create new one's -- you can create a Linux partition alhough not re-size it with partition manager.

4) Restore the partition Image previously backed up --this is the SUSE partition. On RESTORE Acronis True Image will allow you also to re-size (both bigger and smaller) the restored Linux partition provided there is free space on the disk --nice useful facility . Note on restore ensure the partition is normally a LOGICAL partition rather than a PRIMARY unless it's the ONLY partition on that disk. If you are sharing a Disk with Windows it's usual to have these as Logical partitions

I.e The Windows partition 'C' is a PRIMARY partition whilst everything else on that disk are LOGICAL partitions defined in an EXTENDED partition.

5) Now re-boot from the SUSE install disk and go to repair system.

The repair fstab will fix the mount points to reflect the new partitions --if you don't do this you won't be able to mount the root partition correctly and the system won't start properly.

You could probably also do it manually by using another system -- but th VI editor is a pain and you have to get the Partition names and numbers correct -- it's easier to let the SUSE repair facility do all the hard work.

6) ALSO RE-DO GRUB otherwise you won't be able to boot ANYTHING (Windows included). The Repair system option will re-write GRUB at the end of the process.

7) Then re-boot and enjoy.

Cheers

-K

Last edited by 1kyle; 10-13-2005 at 09:49 AM.
 
Old 10-13-2005, 09:57 AM   #7
Jongi
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Perfect. I won't be touching the size of the current SUSE partition. Is Ghosting it still necessary?
 
Old 10-13-2005, 04:46 PM   #8
1kyle
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"Ghosting" is always a good idea since if you hose anything up you can restore without having to re-install everything again.

In anycase still run the "Repair" since creating new partitions / moving partitions will need the fstab to be fixed and also you'll need to re-write GRUB --since the boot program on GRUB loads a specific sector on the disc which then starts the OS load ("bootstrap loader" principles). Once the physical sector has been moved (which of course it will be if partitions are re-sized) then Grub won't find the sector to load and you'll just end up with the GRUB message on your screen.

That's why I use the repair function after fiddling around with partitions --it handles it all automatically.

Cheers

-K
 
Old 10-14-2005, 05:41 AM   #9
Jongi
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Yeah, i figure I'll ghost it anyway seeing as it would be a bit of a pain having to reconfigure the SUSE install to where I have it now. Otherwise the rest of your info seems spot on. Can't believe that i didn't think of just booting of the install disc and reparing the bootloader.

Computer defragged, about to ghost and away we go.
 
  


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