LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Latest LQ Deals
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > SUSE / openSUSE
User Name
Password
SUSE / openSUSE This Forum is for the discussion of Suse Linux.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 11-23-2015, 12:42 PM   #1
bagginmtdoom
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2013
Posts: 40

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Remove Systemd from Opensuse Leap and 13.2


I was wanting to remove systemd from Opensuse and could not find out any information on how to do so or if it was even possible to remove systemd in favor of sysvinit.

Looking around I finally found that you can remove systemd and use sysvinit from this link.

https://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Managing_Systemd

But I have a question.

It says "uninstall systemd. This should be done only with maximum care because the risk of having a system not booting is high;
At least if you have the rpm systemd-sysvinit remove it, otherwise /sbin/init is symlinked to systemd. [see also below]"

So what is the right and preferred way to remove systemd. I saw that xorg and yast is required by the systemd package. And also I install the sysvinit package first then remove systemd then reboot and inside the kernel command line add init=/sbin/init then the system will boot without systemd, right?

So the order that I will want to do this in is:

1.) download sysvinit package

2.) remove systemd and its dependencies

3.) reboot system

4.) add init=/sbin/init

5.) boot to desktop

Thank You!

Last edited by bagginmtdoom; 11-23-2015 at 12:43 PM.
 
Old 11-23-2015, 03:05 PM   #2
Keruskerfuerst
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Horgau, Germany
Distribution: Manjaro KDE, Win 10
Posts: 2,199

Rep: Reputation: 164Reputation: 164
Yes, you can do this, but

it will slow down your system boot time.
 
Old 11-23-2015, 05:39 PM   #3
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,148
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4886Reputation: 4886Reputation: 4886Reputation: 4886Reputation: 4886Reputation: 4886Reputation: 4886Reputation: 4886Reputation: 4886Reputation: 4886Reputation: 4886
AFAIK, unlike Debian in openSuse you are not really meant to slash out the init system and replace it with something else. This means that many packages likely are compiled with systemd support and may or may not be broken when systemd is missing or not running as PID 1. In any case you will need to have deep understanding about openSuse and its inner workings for such an operation. My recommendation if you don't want to run systemd would be to not use openSuse, go for Slackware, Gentoo, CRUX or Void Linux, in all of them systemd is either not present or not the default. You may also go for Debian and switch out systemd with SysVInit, Debian supports that and it is quite easy to do.
 
Old 11-24-2015, 10:00 AM   #4
suicidaleggroll
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: Colorado
Distribution: OpenSUSE, CentOS
Posts: 5,573

Rep: Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
My recommendation if you don't want to run systemd would be to not use openSuse
Agreed

If you don't want to use systemd, then don't use an OS that defaults to systemd and doesn't provide an easy and supported method for getting rid of it. You will likely break nearly every other package in the system by trying to do this, and there's really no point when there are plenty of other distros that don't use systemd in the first place.
 
Old 11-25-2015, 10:24 AM   #5
a4z
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,727

Rep: Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742
if you really do want a systemd free distribution use one, for example Slackware
 
Old 11-27-2015, 09:06 AM   #6
bagginmtdoom
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2013
Posts: 40

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keruskerfuerst View Post
Yes, you can do this, but

it will slow down your system boot time.
So you have actually got opensuse to run without systemd? What steps did you take to do it? I already know, that I would have to recompile some packages like X, kernel, and GRUB.

Last edited by bagginmtdoom; 11-27-2015 at 09:24 AM.
 
Old 11-27-2015, 09:24 AM   #7
bagginmtdoom
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2013
Posts: 40

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
AFAIK, unlike Debian in openSuse you are not really meant to slash out the init system and replace it with something else. This means that many packages likely are compiled with systemd support and may or may not be broken when systemd is missing or not running as PID 1. In any case you will need to have deep understanding about openSuse and its inner workings for such an operation. My recommendation if you don't want to run systemd would be to not use openSuse, go for Slackware, Gentoo, CRUX or Void Linux, in all of them systemd is either not present or not the default. You may also go for Debian and switch out systemd with SysVInit, Debian supports that and it is quite easy to do.
I know that switching init systems will possibly break my system. I also know that I can change to another distro to fulfill my non systemd needs. I like .rpm distros because of the ease of use of the package system and the ease of the spec file and the fact that their is the spec file. But their are no non systemd based .rpm distros or guides to remove systemd, as .rpm distros are heavily intergrated with systemd. So when I found that article the said it was possible to replace systemd I was excited. Its going to take a lot of work, but hopefully I can get it to a half way state.
 
Old 11-27-2015, 02:36 PM   #8
suicidaleggroll
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: Colorado
Distribution: OpenSUSE, CentOS
Posts: 5,573

Rep: Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142Reputation: 2142
Then use CentOS 6, it'll still be supported for the next 5 years.
 
Old 11-27-2015, 03:30 PM   #9
un1x
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2015
Posts: 645

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
use PClinux

http://www.pclinuxos.com/
 
Old 11-27-2015, 03:39 PM   #10
John VV
LQ Muse
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Location: A2 area Mi.
Posts: 17,629

Rep: Reputation: 2652Reputation: 2652Reputation: 2652Reputation: 2652Reputation: 2652Reputation: 2652Reputation: 2652Reputation: 2652Reputation: 2652Reputation: 2652Reputation: 2652
RHEL/CentOS/SL6.7 do not use SystemD

BUT

for most things it actually IMPROVES THINGS

if you really want to stay in the last decade

you will have to use older legacy support Operating Systems
 
Old 11-27-2015, 03:41 PM   #11
un1x
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2015
Posts: 645

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
http://without-systemd.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
 
Old 11-28-2015, 08:14 AM   #12
bagginmtdoom
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2013
Posts: 40

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
Then use CentOS 6, it'll still be supported for the next 5 years.
Thats true, I forgot about how long the CentOS guys supported their Distro's.
 
Old 11-28-2015, 08:15 AM   #13
bagginmtdoom
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2013
Posts: 40

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by John VV View Post
RHEL/CentOS/SL6.7 do not use SystemD

BUT

for most things it actually IMPROVES THINGS

if you really want to stay in the last decade

you will have to use older legacy support Operating Systems
Ya, I would feel as if I were living in Cuba or North Korea, their still stuck in the 1950's!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] Thunderbird 38.2 crashing on openSUSE Leap 42.1 JZL240I-U Linux - Software 20 10-04-2018 06:48 AM
Opinions of openSUSE Leap wagscat123 SUSE / openSUSE 25 11-20-2015 10:10 PM
LXer: openSUSE 13.1 Reaches End of Life on January 5, 2016, Update to openSUSE Leap 42.1 LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 11-13-2015 08:31 AM
[SOLVED] How to completely remove service from systemd using systemctl? OpenSUSE keithostertag Linux - General 9 08-27-2015 04:54 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > SUSE / openSUSE

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:10 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration