LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > SUSE / openSUSE
User Name
Password
SUSE / openSUSE This Forum is for the discussion of Suse Linux.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-26-2005, 08:11 PM   #1
carl0ski
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Melbourne, Victoria Australia
Distribution: Support those that support you :)
Posts: 872
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 30
give regular users permission to NTFS drives


i can read the ntfs partition using root,
but cant access it as any user.

ive tried changing permisions as root
(read only device failed to change permissions)


tried changing permissions of unmounted location .


Is there a SUSE user group to allow access to ntfs hdd?


note fat32 works but neither ntfs drives work.
 
Old 12-26-2005, 10:33 PM   #2
J.W.
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Boise, ID
Distribution: Mint
Posts: 6,642

Rep: Reputation: 85
If your purpose is to allow regular users to read/write to NTFS partitions just as if they were Linux partitions, I'd caution against it mainly because writing to NTFS under Linux is still in an experimental stage only, and you risk corrupting your XP installation.

As you've discovered, FAT32 partitions can be read/written by both Windows and Linux, and if you need a common, shared space that both Linux users and Windows users can use, I'd suggest just making it FAT32.

Perhaps it would be useful if you could elaborate on how this would be used?
 
Old 12-26-2005, 11:32 PM   #3
carl0ski
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Melbourne, Victoria Australia
Distribution: Support those that support you :)
Posts: 872

Original Poster
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by J.W.
If your purpose is to allow regular users to read/write to NTFS partitions just as if they were Linux partitions, I'd caution against it mainly because writing to NTFS under Linux is still in an experimental stage only, and you risk corrupting your XP installation.

As you've discovered, FAT32 partitions can be read/written by both Windows and Linux, and if you need a common, shared space that both Linux users and Windows users can use, I'd suggest just making it FAT32.

Perhaps it would be useful if you could elaborate on how this would be used?

like said i want to read it.
the disk is full with various music Linux ISO's and an array of Linux Software i use.
but only root can seem to reasad any of it.


its a permission error

regular users arent even allowed to read the ntfs drives


mandriva never had this
so i think there must be a security setting in suse somewhere
 
Old 12-27-2005, 05:55 AM   #4
axion0917
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Distribution: Arch Linux / LFS
Posts: 49

Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by carl0ski
like said i want to read it.
its a permission error

regular users arent even allowed to read the ntfs drives
add this to the options part of the line with the ntfs device:

fmask=0222,dmask=0222

That should give everyone read/execute permissions for every directory and file. Remember, NTFS doesn't store permission information like Linux filesystems do.
 
Old 12-29-2005, 03:58 AM   #5
Jongi
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Debian Sid 32/64-bit, F10 32/64-bit
Posts: 1,070

Rep: Reputation: 45
I think if you do
Code:
YaST --> System --> Partitioner --> Click NTFS Partition --> fstab options --> Mountable by user
That might solve the problem as well.
 
Old 12-29-2005, 04:41 AM   #6
carl0ski
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Melbourne, Victoria Australia
Distribution: Support those that support you :)
Posts: 872

Original Poster
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by axion0917
add this to the options part of the line with the ntfs device:

fmask=0222,dmask=0222

That should give everyone read/execute permissions for every directory and file. Remember, NTFS doesn't store permission information like Linux filesystems do.
thanks this one works.





Se Mount as mountable by regular users doesnt work
 
Old 12-29-2005, 05:25 AM   #7
Jongi
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Debian Sid 32/64-bit, F10 32/64-bit
Posts: 1,070

Rep: Reputation: 45
Wonder why. When I set up my partitions installing SUSE 10 I clicked that option and I am able to see all my NTFS partitions as a normal user. I think I also did the above in SUSE 9.3 and it also worked. Oh well as long as you problem is solved.
 
Old 12-29-2005, 05:47 AM   #8
carl0ski
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Melbourne, Victoria Australia
Distribution: Support those that support you :)
Posts: 872

Original Poster
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jongi
Wonder why. When I set up my partitions installing SUSE 10 I clicked that option and I am able to see all my NTFS partitions as a normal user. I think I also did the above in SUSE 9.3 and it also worked. Oh well as long as you problem is solved.

it's because the "Allow User to Mount Drive"
is completely different than
"allow user to read" contents
something on my system got mucked up during System Update


if you open /etc/fstab
your ntfs drives will probably have more than mine did next to them

/dev/sda6 /media/storage ntfs 0 0

Last edited by carl0ski; 12-29-2005 at 05:48 AM.
 
Old 12-29-2005, 07:31 AM   #9
Monkey 9
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: The Netherlands.
Distribution: Debian-Sarge (2.4) / openSuSE 11.0.42 (Linux 2.6.25.9-3-default)/Knoppix 3.9 (2.6) /DSL 4.0.1 (2.4)
Posts: 138

Rep: Reputation: 15
It is all about permissions.
#chown user:user name dir [enter]
will change the ownership of a dir or partition.
(needless to say that you have to fill in the details you want changed)
But you tried this allready....

Last edited by Monkey 9; 12-29-2005 at 07:37 AM.
 
Old 12-29-2005, 07:56 AM   #10
carl0ski
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Melbourne, Victoria Australia
Distribution: Support those that support you :)
Posts: 872

Original Poster
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkey 9
It is all about permissions.
#chown user:user name dir [enter]
will change the ownership of a dir or partition.
(needless to say that you have to fill in the details you want changed)
But you tried this allready....
only applicable if you have write access to the dir or partition.
its not possible to write to mtfs


dont forget -R
for all contained folders contents
 
Old 12-29-2005, 08:09 AM   #11
Jongi
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Debian Sid 32/64-bit, F10 32/64-bit
Posts: 1,070

Rep: Reputation: 45
I thought I had posted this:

Surely you need read rights to be able to mount?
 
Old 12-29-2005, 08:45 AM   #12
Monkey 9
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: The Netherlands.
Distribution: Debian-Sarge (2.4) / openSuSE 11.0.42 (Linux 2.6.25.9-3-default)/Knoppix 3.9 (2.6) /DSL 4.0.1 (2.4)
Posts: 138

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by carl0ski
only applicable if you have write access to the dir or partition.
its not possible to write to mtfs


dont forget -R
for all contained folders contents
Do you mean this?
You say your root has access to the ntfs drive, root must be able to change the ownership of the partition.

I remember I had the same a couple of weeks ago.....
I solved this by:
Total Reinstall, but made many partitions.
/boot,15MB(fat32)
/,1GB(reiserfs)
/usr,4GB(also RFS)
/opt,4GB(rfs)
/var,1GB(rfs),
swap,400mb,
/home as big as you like.(rfs)

Installing this way resulted in all the partitions visible and accessable without any problem, and a lightning fast system.(i use x86_64)

You have to spend some time at the partitioner though, and do not use LVM!
 
Old 12-29-2005, 08:52 AM   #13
Monkey 9
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: The Netherlands.
Distribution: Debian-Sarge (2.4) / openSuSE 11.0.42 (Linux 2.6.25.9-3-default)/Knoppix 3.9 (2.6) /DSL 4.0.1 (2.4)
Posts: 138

Rep: Reputation: 15
A great thing is that if you leave or can leave /home intact, all your config will be saved, and will immediately be the same you left it.
Apps you install later, but were installed previous, will have the config you made earlier. Saves a lot of work!
 
Old 12-29-2005, 06:28 PM   #14
carl0ski
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Melbourne, Victoria Australia
Distribution: Support those that support you :)
Posts: 872

Original Poster
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkey 9
Do you mean this?
You say your root has access to the ntfs drive, root must be able to change the ownership of the partition.

I remember I had the same a couple of weeks ago.....
I solved this by:
Total Reinstall, but made many partitions.
/boot,15MB(fat32)
/,1GB(reiserfs)
/usr,4GB(also RFS)
/opt,4GB(rfs)
/var,1GB(rfs),
swap,400mb,
/home as big as you like.(rfs)

Installing this way resulted in all the partitions visible and accessable without any problem, and a lightning fast system.(i use x86_64)

You have to spend some time at the partitioner though, and do not use LVM!
this isnt really relevant NTFS read issue is a simple problem i dont wish to clean and masacre my hdd. and personally i dont like the above solution
1. making a /boot partition ends up being annoying for me when using multiple kernels.
2. / of 1GB is too small for me /bin and /lib tend to get pretty big for me.
3. /var of only 1GB is also very limiting since it is temporary storage and can be heaviliy relyed upon.

plus you dont have ntfs there


the problem with all methods of changing ownership
(making hardware user mountable, changing owner ship of mount point (drive unmounted)
changing permissions on /dev/hdb
and
chown -R carl0ski:users /media/storage

dont work because NTFS is read only and the filesystem stores the read right permissions of drives .
so root cant write the changes.


god only knows why it buggered up and removed my acces but its fixed now

Last edited by carl0ski; 12-29-2005 at 06:35 PM.
 
Old 12-29-2005, 06:38 PM   #15
carl0ski
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Melbourne, Victoria Australia
Distribution: Support those that support you :)
Posts: 872

Original Poster
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkey 9
A great thing is that if you leave or can leave /home intact, all your config will be saved, and will immediately be the same you left it.
Apps you install later, but were installed previous, will have the config you made earlier. Saves a lot of work!
whos this reply to?




if to me
home only store apps
/etc is all hardware, boots details basically everything before you can even load Kde/Gnome
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Normal users reading regular NTFS mount. MagusYilie Linux - Newbie 2 04-20-2005 11:07 PM
Give user permission to mount/use cdrom drives or usb drives zwyrbla Linux - Newbie 2 08-23-2004 04:30 PM
permission for normal users to read my NTFS HDs. Moebius Linux - Newbie 6 01-26-2004 06:23 AM
give users permission to install software in their directory? ksgill Linux - Newbie 7 12-17-2003 11:16 AM
How do I give users read but not delete permission suse7.1user Linux - General 2 09-03-2003 05:13 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > SUSE / openSUSE

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:30 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration