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Old 06-05-2006, 08:57 AM   #1
wantondstrction
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Unhappy Dual boot windowsxp and suse10.1, suse not recognizing partition table


Well, I've been a windows user for a long time now. I've decided to try something new and take the linux plunge. A friend recommended I try Linux Suse as midway between windows and becoming a full fledged linux user. Well being that I have an Athlon64 I decided I would go for the 64 bit version of Suse.

I'm trying to set up a dual boot between windows xp and suse. I've got my partitions done and windows xp installed but Suse will not recognize the partition table when I try to install it. (I used partition magic and boot magic. I used linux ext2 as the format for my linux partition. Partition magic also offered a "swap partition" for linux which is 500mb. Hope this information helps.)

Pardon my lack of linux skills, but I'm trying to learn and I'm finding it frustrating. Lucky for me I'm not too proud to ask for help!

If anyone can help, I'd be very appreciative.
 
Old 06-05-2006, 11:23 AM   #2
abisko00
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Usually, the easiest way to install SUSE is on empty space. I suggest you remove all partitions that are not used by Windows and let YaST (the SUSE installer) do the partitioning of the empty space. Also, ext2 is not a very advanced filesystem. SUSE uses reiserfs per default. It is safer and I guess faster than ext2.

A swap partition (equivalent to the Windows pagefile) is required with small memory. I have 500MB swap and 500MB RAM and swap is hardly ever used.
 
Old 06-05-2006, 05:18 PM   #3
wantondstrction
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abisko00
Usually, the easiest way to install SUSE is on empty space. I suggest you remove all partitions that are not used by Windows and let YaST (the SUSE installer) do the partitioning of the empty space. Also, ext2 is not a very advanced filesystem. SUSE uses reiserfs per default. It is safer and I guess faster than ext2.

A swap partition (equivalent to the Windows pagefile) is required with small memory. I have 500MB swap and 500MB RAM and swap is hardly ever used.
ahhhhh okay, i have 640mb of ram so i doubt i would have much use for a swap partition.

well I ditched ext2, and suse isn't picking up my ntfs partition.

although I've tried installing fedora instead and didn't have the same problem.

thank you very much
 
Old 06-05-2006, 05:34 PM   #4
flounderworks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abisko00
Usually, the easiest way to install SUSE is on empty space. I suggest you remove all partitions that are not used by Windows and let YaST (the SUSE installer) do the partitioning of the empty space. Also, ext2 is not a very advanced filesystem. SUSE uses reiserfs per default. It is safer and I guess faster than ext2.

A swap partition (equivalent to the Windows pagefile) is required with small memory. I have 500MB swap and 500MB RAM and swap is hardly ever used.

Ditto that. I have installed SUSE in several dual boot formats and SUSE does an excellent job of taking care of the disk partitioning. SUSE can even shrink a Windows partition to make room for Linux.

ext2 is not a good choice as a general file system as it isn't journalized and therefore doesn't give you a robust mechanism for recovering from system crashes (turning the system off before the OP has shut down). I suggest that you use at least ext3, and more than simply a root partition. As a general suggestion I would use something like the following:

/ at least 2GB (better 3GB) reiser or ext3
/usr at least 2.5 pref up to 4GB depending on how much stuff you are going to install.
/swap 250mb (or half the amount of RAM you have, whichever is larger)
/home the remainder of the space left for Linux.

You can also install a /tmp partition separate from the root directory if you like. If you do, the tmp directory can be ext2, as it isn't a partition that requires a journalized filesystem.

There are a couple of reasons for using multiple partions. First, if one section gets corrupted it doesn't affect data in the others. This is especially important for /home v./[others]. Second, it makes for a faster system. There are other partitions you could create (e.g., /opt and /var) that when present could add to the robustness and speed of your system.
 
Old 06-06-2006, 12:47 AM   #5
wantondstrction
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by flounderworks
Ditto that. I have installed SUSE in several dual boot formats and SUSE does an excellent job of taking care of the disk partitioning. SUSE can even shrink a Windows partition to make room for Linux.

ext2 is not a good choice as a general file system as it isn't journalized and therefore doesn't give you a robust mechanism for recovering from system crashes (turning the system off before the OP has shut down). I suggest that you use at least ext3, and more than simply a root partition. As a general suggestion I would use something like the following:

/ at least 2GB (better 3GB) reiser or ext3
/usr at least 2.5 pref up to 4GB depending on how much stuff you are going to install.
/swap 250mb (or half the amount of RAM you have, whichever is larger)
/home the remainder of the space left for Linux.

You can also install a /tmp partition separate from the root directory if you like. If you do, the tmp directory can be ext2, as it isn't a partition that requires a journalized filesystem.

There are a couple of reasons for using multiple partions. First, if one section gets corrupted it doesn't affect data in the others. This is especially important for /home v./[others]. Second, it makes for a faster system. There are other partitions you could create (e.g., /opt and /var) that when present could add to the robustness and speed of your system.

Well I opted for fedora core 5 x64, I have to say it's pretty powerful in comparison to windows. Things run smooth and lightning fast. I wanna get better and learn more so I can move on to better linux distros.

BTW fedora suggested ext3 format by default and it seemed to work fine. I let it take up the free unallocated space on my hard drive. So far, so good.

I'm happy I get to keep firefox too. It's what I've been using on windows for quite a while now, so it's nice to have some familiar territory on linux.

Any suggestions on things to try out?


and thanks for putting up with my newbie questions, I greatly appreciate the help too
 
Old 06-06-2006, 05:41 AM   #6
abisko00
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Quote:
Any suggestions on things to try out?
That very much depends on what you are planning to do. Linux has always been a large playground for me that turned into a very productive workspace, once I figured out what's useful.
 
Old 06-06-2006, 01:46 PM   #7
litlmary
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While I find that ext3 and Reiser are both good fs's, most notably because of the journaling capability, experiencing both on an older computer gives one a good feel for the performance differences, and I must say that Reiser is considerably faster than ext3, just from a seat-of-the-pants standpoint. Modifying Reiser partitions for future configuration changes is a nightmare if that is a consideration, but ext3 isn't a whole lot better, because to do any significant changes, it must first be converted to ext2, modified, then converted back to ext3 (but at least the ability is there).

Also, do not neglect your swap partition. Some amount of swap space is always being used, even if you haven't taxed your physical RAM to its max. The kernel knows that some processes need the speed of the physical RAM more than others, so it relegates some less important/intensive tasks straight to swap and bypasses the physical RAM. If you are at all in the habit of working your computer hard (running several applications at once while burning a cd or dvd and surfing the web while a big email downloads) a large swap partition would behoove you, even if you have lots of CPU overhead and oodles of RAM. Having your hot-rod PC turn into a dog because the swap partition is thrashing itself to death can be frustrating. Unless I am extremely limited on disk space, I usually make my swap between 500MB and 1GB, no matter how much RAM the machine has. Having a dedicated HDD for the swap partition on a controller all by itself can also improve performance more than you would think, provided that the HDD has a respectable spindle speed and UDMA5 or 6 interface.

Also keep in mind that a physical hard disk can only support 4 primary or extended partitions, no matter what size they are or if they fill up the whole disk. If you need more than 4, add another HDD or create an extended partition and create them inside of it as logical partitions.

HTH,

J

Last edited by litlmary; 06-06-2006 at 01:50 PM.
 
Old 06-07-2006, 06:29 AM   #8
wantondstrction
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abisko00
That very much depends on what you are planning to do. Linux has always been a large playground for me that turned into a very productive workspace, once I figured out what's useful.

I'm a game, audio, and video junkie. I'm still trying to figure out some of the media player ins and outs. I'm open to any suggestions though.
 
Old 06-07-2006, 10:10 AM   #9
Rkiver
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Well gaming, go check out wine for what works currently in linux, it's easy to follow the setup and use. Audio, so many choices, so many many choices. For video, I say xine, but not the one you get with suse, as it's crippled. Go to http://cambuca.ldhs.cetuc.puc-rio.br/xine/ and follow the instructions there for full vcd and dvd playback.
 
Old 06-07-2006, 10:22 AM   #10
abisko00
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Personally, I prefer mplayer above xine, simply because it's easier to install (all in one rpm). VLC is also a multi-purpose media player. Check out http://packman.links2linux.org/
They have a whole lot of multimedia rpm for SUSE (not crippled). And it can easily be integrated in YaST.

For audio-stuff, I like amarok, but XMMS is easiest to use and reminds me of the good old winamp.

Last edited by abisko00; 06-07-2006 at 10:23 AM.
 
Old 06-08-2006, 11:42 AM   #11
litlmary
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Quick thought:

I don't really like xine, but it works well once it is configured and running right.

Check out MythTV for some pretty flexible and impressive multimedia support, even if you won't actually be doing DVR/TV type stuff with it.

...and I LOVE Amarok

J

Last edited by litlmary; 06-08-2006 at 11:44 AM.
 
  


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