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Old 06-26-2004, 11:34 PM   #1
VertigoAlpha
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Angry SATA with the Infamous Via VT8237 and Slack 10


I know this is a topic that has been quite well worn, but here it is anyways.

I have the infamous Via VT8237 SATA controller, and a 80GB Seagate HD on my system. I dont have a auxillary IDE drive, so I cannot install Slack on that and compile a kernel. I do have a active XP installation and a somewhat active Slack 9.1 installation.

So thats what I have available. I have tried booting the Slackware 10 install CD, and the kernel picks up the controller just fine. However, there is no SCSI or IDE device assigned to the drive. When I scrolled through the kernel messages, I found this error

kmod: unable to exec /sbin/modprobe -s -k scsi_hostadaper: errorno=2

repeated several times. I'm guessing this is that same obnoxious chicken and egg problem that has plagued users of this chipset many times.

I hope you guys have some ideas, because I'm seriously considering dropping it and sticking with XP.

Thanks for your help.
 
Old 07-01-2004, 07:07 AM   #2
bonecrusher
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Re: SATA with the Infamous Via VT8237 and Slack 10

Quote:
Originally posted by VertigoAlpha
I know this is a topic that has been quite well worn, but here it is anyways.

I have the infamous Via VT8237 SATA controller, and a 80GB Seagate HD on my system. I dont have a auxillary IDE drive, so I cannot install Slack on that and compile a kernel. I do have a active XP installation and a somewhat active Slack 9.1 installation.

So thats what I have available. I have tried booting the Slackware 10 install CD, and the kernel picks up the controller just fine. However, there is no SCSI or IDE device assigned to the drive. When I scrolled through the kernel messages, I found this error

kmod: unable to exec /sbin/modprobe -s -k scsi_hostadaper: errorno=2

repeated several times. I'm guessing this is that same obnoxious chicken and egg problem that has plagued users of this chipset many times.

I hope you guys have some ideas, because I'm seriously considering dropping it and sticking with XP.

Thanks for your help.
What kernel are you booting up with? bare? (If you didn't pick an option at boot time then you are probably using bare.i)...
Your error is the kernel trying to execute a module that isn't available...
I put up a fresh copy of a boot disk on my d/l's here.
I recently compiled this and it has not been tested on a via system as of yet. (As far as i know of anyway.)
Get the one that is called satavia1.i (EDIT: sata.i now - BC) And get the rawrite.zip and the install.1 and .2 root floppies. Install the image with the rawrite file (unzip and use the one that is for nt or xp...) Write the image's (satavia1.i, install.1, install.2) to newer floppies.. and boot with the 3 floppies... then run setup with your slack cd in the cd drive.. (Do this only after you have a compatiable partitions made with 'cfdisk'. )
Not sure how much you know, so let me know what (if any problems you have.

-bc

Last edited by bonecrusher; 07-18-2004 at 11:22 AM.
 
Old 07-02-2004, 05:49 PM   #3
joef
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Possible answer

I'm trying something as I type this that may be a different way to go, especially if you don't want to mess with boot disks. It might sound complicated if you've never tried anything like it, but it was my first time, too, and all it really involved was copying files and typing something exactly as it was displayed. There are a few caveats, but it really was so easy I'm kicking myself for not seeing it sooner.

What I did was create a new Slackware installation CD using the directions on the installation CD. It's really just copying files and typing in a string of commands. What allowed me to see the SATA drive was that I copied my working kernel into the kernels folder before I made the ISO. So if you have a kernel that can see your SATA drive, a Slackware installation disk, and you can copy files and type in a long-ish string of commands, you can do it.

Here's what I did:

I copied the entire contents of the first slackware installation CD into a new directory (slackware) in my /tmp directory. Then I copied over the working kernel, System.map and config file from my present installation (kernel 2.6.6, which I compiled myself). I copied mine into the scsi.s directory of the kernels directory. I first tried to simply make a new directory with a different name, but couldn't get that to work. So I simply replaced the bzImage, config file and System.map in the scsi.s directory. I chose not to replace the bare.i bzImage, though I don't see any reason that shouldn't work. It is the default, so that'll save you a couple of steps. On the other hand, if you mess up the CD might be useless, if that matters.

Once I had copied those three files (overwriting the ones that were there), I opened the README.TXT in the isolinux directory that I copied from the CD. It has line-by-line instructions for making your own installation CD. I followed them to the letter.

One caveat here, don't use rxvt. The first time I did it I used gnome-terminal, and the up arrow allowed me to fix the command sequence when it didn't work (I put the ~ symbol where the - symbol belonged because the text was so small I mistook the two). The gnome terminal replayed the commands as one long command, so I could go back and fix the tildes without retyping the whole thing. With rxvt the up arrow replays the command, but it does it with the carriage returns, so you can't go back up the stack and fix a typo.

The commands build an iso that will be in your /tmp directory. I used xcdroast to burn that to a cd, rebooted and installed. Everything did not go fine on the first reboot, and that's my next caveat: be careful which kernel you install. I had the original installation CDs, so when the first one (the one I made) was done and it asked me if I wanted to continue with the second disk, I did. What I didn't realize, but should have, was that during configuration at the end it installed the kernel I asked for (scsi.s) from the second CD. That meant it was the original scsi.s, not my fake scsi.s. So I simply rebooted with the first install CD, typed setup and reconfigured, installing the proper scsi.s kernel. It's up and running now (it works faster than I can type).

So, to recap:
-- Copy the contents of the first installation CD into a new directory on your hard drive.
-- Gzip your System.map (it's gzipped on the installation CD, so I did it, just to be sure).
-- Find the kernel you want to use (one that recognizes the via SATA chipset) and make sure it's named bzImage (the kernels on the CD are all named bzImage, so I used that name as well -- actually, if you compiled your own kernel, all these files are in the Linux directory where you compiled the kernel. Or you can use what is in the /boot directory of your present installation. Or the one so kindly offered by the earlier poster, just make sure you get the config file and System.map).
-- Replace the contents of one of the kernel subdirectories with your working kernel, config file and Gzipped System.map.
-- Open README.TXT in the /isolinux directory.
-- Follow the instructions for making an iso exactly as they appear. It was all very clear to me, except when they got into how to leave parts out. The whole thing won't fit on one CD, so you have to leave out Gnome or KDE. I wasn't sure if you left them out by typing in the extra lines they had, or by leaving those lines out. In the end, I just typed the instructions as they had them and it worked.
-- Burn the resulting .iso file to a CD.
-- Reboot, install as normal, making sure to select the kernel you just put in there. If you replace bare.i, you just hit return to take that as the default. If you replace something else, as I did, you hit F2, then F3 and type in the name of the kernel you replaced.
-- At the end of installation from the first disk, choose to finish up instead of installing from the second disk. You can always install what you want later, once you have a working installation. You should have either gnome or kde on the disk (depending on how you build the iso), or you can use fluxbox, my window manager of choice.

As I said, my system is up and running now. I'm so happy, yet I still want to kick myself. I've been trying to get a clean install onto that drive for months. I cloned an installation on there once (using the dd command), but that left me with weird partitions, because I was going from a 20 gig drive to an 80. Plus, whatever weirdness was on my old installation was just copied over. I really wanted a fresh installation.

Man, lots of typing. Hope that helps.

Thanks,

joe f.
 
Old 07-03-2004, 07:52 AM   #4
bonecrusher
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joe:

I won't quote because that was an extremely long but informative post. Yes, I know about isolinux/mkisofs and have made .iso's with it before. The problem alot of ppl are facing is the fact that they don't have an extra linux system to use to make an iso on. Hence they can't compile a kernel hence they cannot make the needed .iso... I would love to get away from boot disk - believe me. But it is the only way some ppl can get an installation up and going. (Some even can't then!) But thanks for the info-I am sure alot of ppl appreciated it. PS: It would be nice if you could put this .iso up for d/load somewhere. That would actually help some ppl out there, because some can still d/load/burn/install just can't compile/make their own. I have also stayed away from posting .iso's because of the lengh. I am sure some ppl wouldn't mind d/loading an .iso though. I think the boot disk is easier for most at this point, though - but thanks again!!!

-BC

EDIT:
Well I take ALL that back now. There is a ISO up now. It is d/loadable by bittorrent. Try this:
Linux Downloads Here
and get the .torrent file marked 'slack10'

Last edited by bonecrusher; 07-18-2004 at 11:28 AM.
 
Old 07-03-2004, 08:21 AM   #5
joef
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Not the answer for everybody

Bonecrusher:

Yeah, putting up a good iso would go a long way toward fixing this problem. I'm afraid I'm not the guy for the job, however. First, my present iso has my working kernel, which wouldn't help all that many people. I compile it strictly for my machine, and don't generally use modules. Second, putting up an iso on my own site would burn through my available bandwidth after about, oh, five or six downloads.

What we need is a guru somewhere to make an iso using the generic kernel included in /testing on the official slackware CDs, making sure, of course, that the SATA options are enabled. That would help a lot of people. I'm pretty sure that's beyond my expertise, however.

Any ideas who we can petition for such help? Userlocal.com? Slackware.no?

I'll beg, but I'm not sure who to beg.

See ya,

joe f.
 
Old 07-12-2004, 09:48 AM   #6
bonecrusher
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SATA boot disk - SATA ISO SLACKWARE 10

Note:

I have updated my sata.i bootdisk. It is now patched against the 2.4.26 kernel to match up with Slackware 10.0. It can be found here:

SATA.I Directory

I also have a new ISO burned that will do an install of Slack 10.0 on a Serial ATA Hard drive. It runs just like the one you get from one of the mirrors except I added my kernel (sata.i) as the default boot kernel. (Just hit ENTER when at the 'boot:' prompt...)

If someone is willing to host this ISO let me know as I don't have the bandwidth or the room right now. (Even if someone has a box that could seed it as a .torrent would be great..) Of course an FTP site would be the best.

-bc

If you want to send me email please feel free.

PS:
(EDIT)

I now have an ISO made and I am trying to 'get it out there' by the use of bittorrent. The torrent for CD#1 is at the link above as well as the boot disk. If you have a need for the whole ISO just grab the torrent and proceed using bittorrent or one of the nemerous other programs that d/load torrent files!



Last edited by bonecrusher; 07-13-2004 at 09:46 AM.
 
Old 07-16-2004, 10:16 AM   #7
bonecrusher
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Post belated Jeff Garzik reply...

I meant to post this earlier, but forgot to put it here. Here is my email response back from Jeff Garzik (maintainer of libata - which is the code that gets your sata drive up and running).
I got this awhile back and since it was written pertaining to the VIA controller I thouhgt this would be approriate to post it here. He doesn't really elaborate very much, but he gave me a few idea's (and more importantly the ppl who have via controllers) If I were one of those ppl who have a VIA and can't get it to work, I would try:
noprobe=/dev/hdg (or whatever drive IDE is 'attaching' to)
(he had the command backwards as far as I can tell...) (see below)

Anyway....

We all owe him a big thanks for working on this (coding it seemingly daily), but anyway here it is:





Brady Shea wrote:
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1
>
>
>
> Mr. Garzik:
>
> I am so sorry to bug you with this, but I noticed that you wanted to be
> notified of bugs (I think I saw this on kerneltrap.org I believe) -
> anyway, I currently have been compiling kernels for the Slackware
> system. And we have been having problems with the via driver
> specifically. It would seem it does not want to be recognized as a scsi
> system.
>
> ~ (After reading up on this, I think I am correct in thinking that ich5
> is suppose to come up as scsi and others are not??? Please shed some
> light on this if you can?)
>
> If it comes up at boot time at all it is recog'ed as /dev/hde or
> I have seen /dev/hdg ... is this an inherent problem with libata that
> you know of are am I doing something wrong when compiling. I wouldn't be
> writing to you, but I have exhausted all avenues and thought I would
> bring it to your attn.

Well, it's not clear from your message that you mean VIA SATA, but I'll
go ahead and assume that (from your email subject line).

The simple answer may be to disable CONFIG_BLK_DEV_GENERIC, which
disables the VIA SATA sub-driver, inside the IDE driver.

For very recent kernels, you may also disable CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE_SATA,
to ensure that libata (CONFIG_SCSI_SATA) is the only driver that will
use your SATA devices.

You can also pass hdX=noprobe (hdg=noprobe, hde=noprobe, etc.) to get
the IDE layer to skip certain devices, allowing them to be used by other
drivers.

Jeff


P.S. Please always CC linux-ide@vger.kernel.org, so that knowledge can
be shared and archived.


**** Ok thats the email response. If someone out (*cough* VerigoAlpha *cough*) there who has a VIA controller would try the above methods???

Please let me know!


Note:
CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE_SATA is an option on only VERY new kernels ----> like mm patch and bitkeeper et al... So don't bother with it unless you are running one of these.

bc

Last edited by bonecrusher; 07-16-2004 at 10:21 AM.
 
Old 08-08-2004, 12:52 PM   #8
froedi
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Re: Possible answer

Quote:
Originally posted by joef
I'm trying something as I type this that may be a different way to go, especially if you don't want to mess with boot disks. It might sound complicated if you've never tried anything like it, but it was my first time, too, and all it really involved was copying files and typing something exactly as it was displayed. There are a few caveats, but it really was so easy I'm kicking myself for not seeing it sooner.

What I did was create a new Slackware installation CD using the directions on the installation CD. It's really just copying files and typing in a string of commands. What allowed me to see the SATA drive was that I copied my working kernel into the kernels folder before I made the ISO. So if you have a kernel that can see your SATA drive, a Slackware installation disk, and you can copy files and type in a long-ish string of commands, you can do it.

Here's what I did:

I copied the entire contents of the first slackware installation CD into a new directory (slackware) in my /tmp directory. Then I copied over the working kernel, System.map and config file from my present installation (kernel 2.6.6, which I compiled myself). I copied mine into the scsi.s directory of the kernels directory. I first tried to simply make a new directory with a different name, but couldn't get that to work. So I simply replaced the bzImage, config file and System.map in the scsi.s directory. I chose not to replace the bare.i bzImage, though I don't see any reason that shouldn't work. It is the default, so that'll save you a couple of steps. On the other hand, if you mess up the CD might be useless, if that matters.

Once I had copied those three files (overwriting the ones that were there), I opened the README.TXT in the isolinux directory that I copied from the CD. It has line-by-line instructions for making your own installation CD. I followed them to the letter.

One caveat here, don't use rxvt. The first time I did it I used gnome-terminal, and the up arrow allowed me to fix the command sequence when it didn't work (I put the ~ symbol where the - symbol belonged because the text was so small I mistook the two). The gnome terminal replayed the commands as one long command, so I could go back and fix the tildes without retyping the whole thing. With rxvt the up arrow replays the command, but it does it with the carriage returns, so you can't go back up the stack and fix a typo.

The commands build an iso that will be in your /tmp directory. I used xcdroast to burn that to a cd, rebooted and installed. Everything did not go fine on the first reboot, and that's my next caveat: be careful which kernel you install. I had the original installation CDs, so when the first one (the one I made) was done and it asked me if I wanted to continue with the second disk, I did. What I didn't realize, but should have, was that during configuration at the end it installed the kernel I asked for (scsi.s) from the second CD. That meant it was the original scsi.s, not my fake scsi.s. So I simply rebooted with the first install CD, typed setup and reconfigured, installing the proper scsi.s kernel. It's up and running now (it works faster than I can type).

So, to recap:
-- Copy the contents of the first installation CD into a new directory on your hard drive.
-- Gzip your System.map (it's gzipped on the installation CD, so I did it, just to be sure).
-- Find the kernel you want to use (one that recognizes the via SATA chipset) and make sure it's named bzImage (the kernels on the CD are all named bzImage, so I used that name as well -- actually, if you compiled your own kernel, all these files are in the Linux directory where you compiled the kernel. Or you can use what is in the /boot directory of your present installation. Or the one so kindly offered by the earlier poster, just make sure you get the config file and System.map).
-- Replace the contents of one of the kernel subdirectories with your working kernel, config file and Gzipped System.map.
-- Open README.TXT in the /isolinux directory.
-- Follow the instructions for making an iso exactly as they appear. It was all very clear to me, except when they got into how to leave parts out. The whole thing won't fit on one CD, so you have to leave out Gnome or KDE. I wasn't sure if you left them out by typing in the extra lines they had, or by leaving those lines out. In the end, I just typed the instructions as they had them and it worked.
-- Burn the resulting .iso file to a CD.
-- Reboot, install as normal, making sure to select the kernel you just put in there. If you replace bare.i, you just hit return to take that as the default. If you replace something else, as I did, you hit F2, then F3 and type in the name of the kernel you replaced.
-- At the end of installation from the first disk, choose to finish up instead of installing from the second disk. You can always install what you want later, once you have a working installation. You should have either gnome or kde on the disk (depending on how you build the iso), or you can use fluxbox, my window manager of choice.

As I said, my system is up and running now. I'm so happy, yet I still want to kick myself. I've been trying to get a clean install onto that drive for months. I cloned an installation on there once (using the dd command), but that left me with weird partitions, because I was going from a 20 gig drive to an 80. Plus, whatever weirdness was on my old installation was just copied over. I really wanted a fresh installation.

Man, lots of typing. Hope that helps.

Thanks,

joe f.
hey joe,
I used your little tutorial to create my very own slackware install cd - unfortunaltely I've got some trouble booting the kernel I compiled -> "Invalid or corrupt kernel image"

what I did is:
- compile a 2.6.7 kernel (which hopefully will detect my sata hard disk correctly)
- gzip the System.map file, rename vmLinuz to bzImage
- replace the original bare.i kernel with mine
- make an ISO out of it and burn it

it boots, but when I hit <return> I get the error message mentioned above :/
maybe you can tell me whether I did something wrong because I don't have a clue - that would be great.
 
Old 08-08-2004, 01:53 PM   #9
bonecrusher
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Thumbs up ISO already done.

Quote:
Originally posted by froedi
hey joe,
I used your little tutorial to create my very own slackware install cd - unfortunaltely I've got some trouble booting the kernel I compiled -> "Invalid or corrupt kernel image"

what I did is:
- compile a 2.6.7 kernel (which hopefully will detect my sata hard disk correctly)
- gzip the System.map file, rename vmLinuz to bzImage
- replace the original bare.i kernel with mine
- make an ISO out of it and burn it

it boots, but when I hit <return> I get the error message mentioned above :/
maybe you can tell me whether I did something wrong because I don't have a clue - that would be great.
Hey there Froedi,

Thought I would mention to ya about my ISO, you probably know this, but if you knew about it and couldn't get ahold of it through the bittorrent method, it is now available via FTP means.

You can either go to my web site:

Four Elements

to get the link along with a little bit of explanation... or just (making sure you use an FTP client of some sort with resume feature).. go here to download it (site where the SATA Slack v10 ISO is):

FTP Site for Slackware (v10) Disk#1 SATA ISO


If you would like help on making your own ISO, though, go to my web site and contact me or something...(I am in process of posting instructions on how I made the ISO above...)

bc

ps:
Not sure what you did wrong on your ISO, but thought this might help you some...
 
Old 08-09-2004, 09:55 AM   #10
froedi
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hey bonecrusher,

of course I know about your ISO ;>
but as you might remember, I already used your bootdisk, which unfortunately didn't detect my hd properly.
and as you said that there's not really a difference between using the bootdisk or the ISO, the ISO wouldn't have solved my problem either.

that's why I want to create my very own install cd with a customized 2.6.7 kernel (I don't really know why but I believe / hope that it'll work with a 2.6.7 kernel (rather than with a 2.4.26) - it's just some feeling inside of me )

I regard this as the final attempt to get my sata drive working before I go and get an IDE drive :/

I followed joef's little tutorial but now I'm stuck because the kernel I compiled won't boot.
I'm not quite sure what went wrong, but I think it has got something to do with the kernel itself. (I might have made a mistake when compiling it.)

I would really appreciate it if you could explain all the relevant steps you took when you created your ISO. maybe it'll work that way.
 
Old 08-09-2004, 10:02 AM   #11
bonecrusher
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Quote:
Originally posted by froedi
hey bonecrusher,

of course I know about your ISO ;>
but as you might remember, I already used your bootdisk, which unfortunately didn't detect my hd properly.
and as you said that there's not really a difference between using the bootdisk or the ISO, the ISO wouldn't have solved my problem either.

that's why I want to create my very own install cd with a customized 2.6.7 kernel (I don't really know why but I believe / hope that it'll work with a 2.6.7 kernel (rather than with a 2.4.26) - it's just some feeling inside of me )

I regard this as the final attempt to get my sata drive working before I go and get an IDE drive :/

I followed joef's little tutorial but now I'm stuck because the kernel I compiled won't boot.
I'm not quite sure what went wrong, but I think it has got something to do with the kernel itself. (I might have made a mistake when compiling it.)

I would really appreciate it if you could explain all the relevant steps you took when you created your ISO. maybe it'll work that way.
Yea, I was tripping on not remember you.. sorry.. My mind has been elsewhere I guess :|

Anyway go to my web site and email me.. the thread for this convo would probably drift to other things and I don't feel its really relavent right here...

bc

p.s.

(You can just click the WWW button below or look for the web site above.. but then probably already knew that, too hehe
 
Old 08-10-2004, 09:16 AM   #12
paulinimus
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Unhappy

Hey,

I also have problems with my brand new box,
I dont hve the bandwidth to download the new sata cd iso, so Im using floppies : (

Im a newb, and have trouble configuring it.

I have the sat boot floppy image working fine, but I need to get install.1 and .2 floppies.

Are the images for these included with the Slack10 distro discs?

If not, can I download them online anywhere?

Paulinimus
 
Old 08-10-2004, 09:27 AM   #13
froedi
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Quote:
Originally posted by paulinimus
I have the sat boot floppy image working fine, but I need to get install.1 and .2 floppies.
you can find both files in the rootdisks directory of slackware install cd 1.
just write them to a floppy each and you'll be fine.
 
Old 08-23-2004, 11:28 PM   #14
Travers
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I'm not banging on slackware, or anything. It's just that SuSE 9.1 Personal comes with the right module for SATA on the VIA VT 8237 Southbridge (sata_via.ko.) That's how I got my sata's to work on the VT8237. YaST will preload it so you can install to SATA, plus YaST will make the initrd to include the module. That's pretty easy...
 
Old 08-24-2004, 07:18 AM   #15
bonecrusher
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Quote:
Originally posted by Travers
I'm not banging on slackware, or anything. It's just that SuSE 9.1 Personal comes with the right module for SATA on the VIA VT 8237 Southbridge (sata_via.ko.) That's how I got my sata's to work on the VT8237. YaST will preload it so you can install to SATA, plus YaST will make the initrd to include the module. That's pretty easy...
Alot of distro's come with drivers for Serial ATA. SuSE is certainly not the only one so you know. But some people prefer to run Slackware. There are lots of reasons and vary as much as the person running it, but if SuSE 'works' for you then run with it. For my part, I like to tweak and mess around with linux quite a bit, and running something that is so much like M$ isn't my cup of tea. (Mandrake being number 1 in my mind in that catagory-which also seems to run most SATA chipsets just fine...and is still Linux-don't get me wrong) But this is me. You know what they say about opinions

bc
 
  


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