LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Latest LQ Deals
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware > Slackware - Installation
User Name
Password
Slackware - Installation This forum is for the discussion of installation issues with Slackware.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 04-06-2020, 10:44 PM   #16
bassmadrigal
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: West Jordan, UT, USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,104

Rep: Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774

Your mkinitrd_command_generator.sh output seems uncharacteristically small. On my system, the default spits out:

Code:
#
# mkinitrd_command_generator.sh revision 1.45
#
# This script will now make a recommendation about the command to use
# in case you require an initrd image to boot a kernel that does not
# have support for your storage or root filesystem built in
# (such as the Slackware 'generic' kernels').
# A suitable 'mkinitrd' command will be:

mkinitrd -c -k 5.4.30 -f ext4 -r /dev/nvme0n1p3 -m usb-storage:xhci-hcd:xhci-pci:ohci-pci:ehci-pci:uhci-hcd:ehci-hcd:hid:usbhid:i2c-hid:hid_generic:hid-cherry:hid-logitech:hid-logitech-dj:hid-logitech-hidpp:hid-lenovo:hid-microsoft:hid_multitouch:jbd2:mbcache:ext4 -u -o /boot/initrd.gz
Based on all the errors, I'm guessing you didn't bind mount some needed partitions when you chroot. I would highly recommend booting off a Slackware installation disk, just to make sure everything is loaded as it should. There is a SlackDocs article on how to setup a chroot based on a Slackware install disk (it should still work otherwise, but some of the commands might be different).

In that article, before you actually chroot to your installation, you would bind mount some needed system filesystems using the following command (assuming your root partition is mounted to /mnt/)

Code:
mount -o bind /dev /mnt/dev
mount -o bind /proc /mnt/proc
mount -o bind /sys /mnt/sys
After that, once you chroot, running mkinitrd_command_generator.sh should provide a lot more output, and you'd want to make sure you switch your -r option to either UUID or label (be sure if using the label that there's no chance of any other systems having the same label -- you may want to use the UUID there, just in case).

Also, for ease of reading, it helps to put your console output in [code][/code] tags as it will keep any indenting and spacing. This would be especially noticeable with your fstab output.
 
Old 04-08-2020, 07:59 AM   #17
Dan Suson
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Location: Valparaiso, IN
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 47

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2
I tried to boot from the Slackware installation disk. It resulted in a kernel panic again. The last message is

Kernel panic - not syncing: VFS: Unable to mount root fs on unknown-block(0,0)

I'll take a look at the article and dig around some more.
 
Old 04-08-2020, 08:37 AM   #18
0XBF
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2018
Location: Winnipeg
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 188

Rep: Reputation: 138Reputation: 138
How did you manage to chroot into the disk the first time? Like you stated here:
Quote:
(Remember that I am using different computers to set this up and to test the boot). In order to get cleaner commands, I did a chroot /run/media/daniel/ResearchFS in order to get the paths to point to the software installed on the SSD.
If you can repeat that chroot then do those bind mounts (e.g. "mount -o bind /dev /run/media/daniel/ResearchFS/dev" etc.) before the chroot so that the mkinitrd_command_generator script can see the devices on the system and suggest proper drivers.

If thats a differnt machine than the one your booting from there might be some problems with different hardware. It'd be best to boot onto the machine you want to use with an install disk or live cd to do that operation.

Last edited by 0XBF; 04-08-2020 at 08:38 AM.
 
Old 04-08-2020, 10:29 AM   #19
bassmadrigal
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: West Jordan, UT, USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,104

Rep: Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Suson View Post
I tried to boot from the Slackware installation disk. It resulted in a kernel panic again. The last message is

Kernel panic - not syncing: VFS: Unable to mount root fs on unknown-block(0,0)

I'll take a look at the article and dig around some more.
Just boot off the disk like you're trying to install Slackware and just don't type setup when you get to the prompt. If you try and use it as the rescue boot and don't type things in right, it could lead to that kernel panic.
 
Old 04-08-2020, 06:11 PM   #20
gus3
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2014
Distribution: Slackware (x86 and ARM)
Posts: 320

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by bassmadrigal View Post
Just boot off the disk like you're trying to install Slackware and just don't type setup when you get to the prompt. If you try and use it as the rescue boot and don't type things in right, it could lead to that kernel panic.
With that kernel boot-up panic message, I doubt the command prompt ever appeared.
 
Old 04-09-2020, 10:11 AM   #21
bassmadrigal
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: West Jordan, UT, USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,104

Rep: Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774
Quote:
Originally Posted by gus3 View Post
With that kernel boot-up panic message, I doubt the command prompt ever appeared.
I'm thinking OP used the installation disk to try and boot their OS (following the "in a pinch" portion). If they just boot it like they were installing Slackware, it will most likely get OP to a command prompt.
 
Old 04-10-2020, 09:09 AM   #22
Dan Suson
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Location: Valparaiso, IN
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 47

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2
@OXBF - I used my desktop machine to mount the SSD then did a chroot to where it was mounted. Both my desktop machine and the SSD have the same release of slackware64-current installed.

@bassmadrigal & gus3 - When I tried to boot off of the slackware install script, I used the huge.s root=/dev/sdb1 rdinit=ro command at the boot prompt from the CD. This started the SSD boot process which eventually lead to the kernel panic.

I will try to see if I can modify the initrd file as suggested at the top of this page and report back
 
Old 04-10-2020, 10:43 AM   #23
bassmadrigal
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: West Jordan, UT, USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,104

Rep: Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Suson View Post
@bassmadrigal & gus3 - When I tried to boot off of the slackware install script, I used the huge.s root=/dev/sdb1 rdinit=ro command at the boot prompt from the CD.
Yeah, don't do that. Just boot off the disk like you were going to install Slackware (so just hit enter on that screen without typing anything in). Then once you are at the prompt (after hitting enter for the keyboard localization and enter to log in as root), you can then mount your root partition, bind mount proc, dev, and sys into that root partition, then chroot and finish the rest of the process from there.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-10-2020, 05:07 PM   #24
Dan Suson
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Location: Valparaiso, IN
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 47

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2
Good news! I bound the extra directories and re-ran mkinitrd_command_generator.sh. That had a lot more modules associated with it this time. After installing the new initrd.gz, lilo tested and installed without a problem, and then (signal the trumpets) the system booted from the SSD!! My thanks to everyone for all of the help!
 
Old 04-10-2020, 06:31 PM   #25
bassmadrigal
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: West Jordan, UT, USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,104

Rep: Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774Reputation: 4774
Congrats!
 
Old 04-13-2020, 04:20 PM   #26
Dan Suson
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Location: Valparaiso, IN
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 47

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2
I'm unmarking this as solved for a moment to see if I can get help with a strange error. As reported above I'm able to boot off of the SSD. I noticed that during the start up I get a line that says

Code:
modprobe: ERROR: could not insert 'ext4': Exec format error
Not much on the web about this, but most of what I found points to driver errors. The system continued to boot so I didn't worry about it.

I went to install some additional packages from a USB drive and after about 15 minutes everything went off the rails and the system locked up. While I got around this by copying the files onto the SSD drive from my main computer so that I only have the SSD drive inserted while running off of the drive, I'm concerned about what is going on. I'll be giving this drive to a student to work on a research project and I don't know if they will try to use a second USB drive at the same time.

Any thoughts? Could this be related to the specific drivers listed on the mkinitrd command line?
 
Old 04-14-2020, 06:38 AM   #27
Didier Spaier
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Location: Paris, France
Distribution: Slint64-14.2.1.2 on Lenovo Thinkpad W520
Posts: 9,379

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Suson View Post
Any thoughts? Could this be related to the specific drivers listed on the mkinitrd command line?
This "error" message is actually just a warning. It is displayed because the modprobe command tries to insert as module a driver already built in the kernel. This is harmless, just ignore it. Or use a generic kernel, that does not have the ext4 driver built in.

Last edited by Didier Spaier; 04-14-2020 at 06:42 AM.
 
Old 04-16-2020, 08:43 AM   #28
Dan Suson
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Location: Valparaiso, IN
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 47

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2
That's good to know. Any ideas on why the system crashed when I inserted a second USB drive?
 
  


Reply

Tags
installation, slackware, usb


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Access To Encrypted SSD Partition With Native Password in SSD>SATA Enclosure skidvicious Linux - Hardware 5 12-03-2015 04:40 PM
[SOLVED] I have a SSD a 500GB drive and a 2TB drive and want to move Ubuntu from 500GB to SSD greatormesby Linux - Newbie 12 07-06-2015 09:58 AM
To SSD or not to SSD jlinkels Linux - Hardware 14 10-02-2012 07:36 AM
SSD raid1 vs SSD raid10 advice ? wonker Linux - Hardware 8 05-23-2012 01:46 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware > Slackware - Installation

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:58 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration