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Old 05-14-2009, 07:06 PM   #1
escaflown
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Partition recommendation


Hello everyone,
I have 40 GB of free disk space on my hard drive that I would like to dedicate to Slackware. I am looking for some advices about the optimal partitioning strategy to adopt: size of /(root) partition, /usr, /home, ... Thanks!
 
Old 05-15-2009, 03:10 AM   #2
fotoguy
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This can be hard to define since everyone has different needs, and depending on what you are going to use this for. If you are using it to test and run different software, you might need a larger /(root) partition.

If you are using it for just general web surfing, checking you emails, keeping in contact with friends, you might not need such a large root partition and only need a small /home. If you download mp3 and videos, you will need a larger /home partition. If you are running just servers on it, your log files can become quite large quickly, so you may need to have /var/log on a separate partition and define a larger size for it.
 
Old 05-15-2009, 03:31 AM   #3
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if i were you i would make /home 30G and /10G this is if u will use it as a Desktop
 
Old 05-15-2009, 03:59 AM   #4
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I would create a swap partition, if there's still no one.
Usually it's recommended to have swap space at least as your RAM is.
 
Old 05-15-2009, 04:32 AM   #5
Libu
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I too would go with 10G for "/" and the rest for /home (and around 1G for swap, if you haven't already set that up.)
Usually a normal slackware installation would take up around 3-4G. And the rest of the space in / can be used for additional program installation. In case you run out of space on /, then you can repartition your /home and assign additional space to "/" as and when needed.
 
Old 05-15-2009, 07:19 AM   #6
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by escaflown View Post
Hello everyone,
I have 40 GB of free disk space on my hard drive that I would like to dedicate to Slackware. I am looking for some advices about the optimal partitioning strategy to adopt: size of /(root) partition, /usr, /home, ... Thanks!
As you can see by the example(s) below that '/' doesn't require that much when you create partitions for '/usr', '/var', '/home', and '/tmp'. Partition schemes are very personal but there are advantages to utilizing good layouts. You could move or create your '/home' at the end of the hdd space then if you need to re-size then use space from '/home' by shrinking then allocate a new partition space.

If you don't add a lot then your '/usr' could be squashed down a bit. This particular machine is a testbed so things have been generous for space allocation.

I hope this satisfies your post request.

Code:
:~# fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xf5b5f5b5

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1        3824    30716248+   7  HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda2            3825        4074     2008125   82  Linux swap
/dev/sda3            4075       10300    50010345   83  Linux
/dev/sda4           10301       60801   405649282+   5  Extended
/dev/sda5           10301       10425     1004031   83  Linux
/dev/sda6           10426       11671    10008463+  83  Linux
/dev/sda7           11672       12668     8008371   83  Linux
/dev/sda8           12669       12918     2008093+  83  Linux
/dev/sda9           12919       13915     8008371   83  Linux
/dev/sda10          13916       15161    10008463+  83  Linux
/dev/sda11          15162       16407    10008463+  83  Linux
/dev/sda12          16408       28856    99996561   83  Linux
/dev/sda13          28857       41305    99996561   83  Linux
/dev/sda14          41306       53754    99996561   83  Linux
/dev/sda15          53755       60801    56604996   83  Linux

Disk /dev/sdd: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xb2214719

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdd1   *           1        4981    40009851    7  HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sdd2            4982        9962    40009882+  83  Linux

:~# cfdisk /dev/sda

cfdisk (util-linux-ng 2.13.1)

                              Disk Drive: /dev/sda
                       Size: 500107862016 bytes, 500.1 GB
             Heads: 255   Sectors per Track: 63   Cylinders: 60801

    Name        Flags      Part Type  FS Type          [Label]        Size (MB)
 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    sda1        Boot        Primary   NTFS             [^C]            31453.48
    sda2                    Primary   Linux swap                        2056.32
    sda3                    Primary   Linux ext3       [/spare1]       51210.60
    sda5                    Logical   Linux ext3       [/]              1028.16
    sda6                    Logical   Linux ext3       [/home]         10248.70
    sda7                    Logical   Linux ext3       [/usr]           8200.61
    sda8                    Logical   Linux ext3       [/var]           2056.32
    sda9                    Logical   Linux ext3       [/tmp]           8200.61
    sda10                   Logical   Linux ext3                       10248.70
    sda11                   Logical   Linux ext3                       10248.70
    sda12                   Logical   Linux ext3                      102396.52
    sda13                   Logical   Linux ext3                      102396.52


~# df -h
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda5             966M  204M  713M  23% /
/dev/sda6             9.4G  745M  8.2G   9% /home
/dev/sda7             7.6G  3.9G  3.3G  55% /usr
/dev/sda8             1.9G   68M  1.8G   4% /var
/dev/sda9             7.6G  146M  7.0G   2% /tmp
/dev/sda1              30G  9.4G   20G  33% /mnt/winxp
tmpfs                 884M     0  884M   0% /dev/shm
/dev/sdd2              38G   25G   11G  70% /media/Linux_Archive

~# cat /etc/fstab
/dev/sda2        swap             swap        defaults         0   0
/dev/sda5        /                ext3        defaults         1   1
/dev/sda6        /home            ext3        defaults         1   2
/dev/sda7        /usr             ext3        defaults         1   2
/dev/sda8        /var             ext3        defaults         1   2
/dev/sda9        /tmp             ext3        defaults         1   2
/dev/sda1        /mnt/winxp       ntfs-3g     umask=000        1   0
#/dev/cdrom      /mnt/cdrom       auto        noauto,owner,ro  0   0
/dev/fd0         /mnt/floppy      auto        noauto,owner     0   0
devpts           /dev/pts         devpts      gid=5,mode=620   0   0
proc             /proc            proc        defaults         0   0
tmpfs            /dev/shm         tmpfs       defaults         0   0
 
Old 05-15-2009, 07:41 AM   #7
H_TeXMeX_H
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If you wanted maximum space efficiency you could just make one large partition. The downside is upgrades will be more difficult.
 
Old 05-16-2009, 01:51 AM   #8
escaflown
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I would like to thank you all for your advises. I'm going for 1 GB of swap with the configuration style proposed by onebuck. Thanks!!!
 
Old 05-16-2009, 03:35 AM   #9
Toods
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Instead of separate HD partition for /tmp, I create it in ram by having the following line in '/etc/fstab':

Code:
tmpfs     /tmp       tmpfs       defaults     0   0
I also use this for my Firefox disk cache to avoid lots of disk writes during browsing.

Bill.
 
Old 05-16-2009, 04:46 PM   #10
escaflown
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toods View Post
Instead of separate HD partition for /tmp, I create it in ram by having the following line in '/etc/fstab':

Code:
tmpfs     /tmp       tmpfs       defaults     0   0
I also use this for my Firefox disk cache to avoid lots of disk writes during browsing.

Bill.
Doesn't it slow down the system a little bit? You're taking out some of your RAM by doing that, right?
 
Old 05-17-2009, 02:37 AM   #11
Toods
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Quote:
Originally Posted by escaflown View Post
Doesn't it slow down the system a little bit? You're taking out some of your RAM by doing that, right?
I understand that the default maximum size for 'tmpfs' is half of physical ram. I have half gig and never see any slow down nor use of 'swap'. I guess it depends how ram intensive one's application are. The only time I ran into any problem was compiling Firefox with PGO.

Bill.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 07:22 AM   #12
onebuck
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Hi,

You can always set the 'size' of the RAM that will be used by tmpfs;

Quote:
excerpt tmpfs wiki;

tmpfs is a file system that stores all files in virtual memory (meaning it will also use the swap space). It adjusts the actual memory size it uses to fit the files, so it doesn't used a fixed amount of memory. It allows to specify a maximum size with the size option when (re)mounting. The default size is half the available RAM.

It is mainly used to implement POSIX shared memory in Linux, by mounting a tmpfs file system on /dev/shm. It is also often mounted on /tmp, /var/tmp or some other personal tmp directory to increase performance of these often used directories. It is also used by udev (which mounts a tmpfs on /dev/).
Example usage

mounting a tmpfs on /tmp with max size of 512 Megabytes and permissions of 1777:

mount -t tmpfs tmpfs /tmp -o size=512M,mode=1777

the equivalent entry in the fstab

Read more: http://wiki.linuxquestions.org/wiki/...xzz0FlXWycT5&B
 
Old 06-12-2009, 10:04 AM   #13
archtoad6
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Any fixed partitioning scheme is inflexible. If you guess wrong about how your different filesystems will grow, you can have one running out of space while another has bytes to spare.

Have you considered LVM? (I assume that Slack can do LVM.)
 
Old 06-12-2009, 10:43 AM   #14
H_TeXMeX_H
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Quote:
Originally Posted by archtoad6 View Post
Any fixed partitioning scheme is inflexible. If you guess wrong about how your different filesystems will grow, you can have one running out of space while another has bytes to spare.

Have you considered LVM? (I assume that Slack can do LVM.)
LVM does work with slackware. But, having one large partition is my solution ... no space wasted, and it's simple, and easy to recover from (LVM is more difficult).
 
Old 06-14-2009, 03:18 PM   #15
archtoad6
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Glad to know that (as I suspected) Slack has LVM.

No argument about simplicity and ease of recovery; my comment was offering an alternative to post #6 .
 
  


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