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Old 04-09-2018, 11:30 PM   #1
MLagoa
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SlackwareARM +XFCE= No Web Browser, no LibreOffice?


After a painful installation of SlackwareARM-14.2 (I am a beginner) using the SARPI installer, I made the lightweight installation procedure = System + XFCE.
However, I did not find any version of web brower (Firefox, Chromium, Vivaldi, etc).
I know that the slackwarearm-14.2 package has konqueror in the KDE package, but I do not want to install this package because it consumes a lot of hardware!
I tried to convert vivaldi-stable.armhf.deb to * .tgz (# alien -t -c vivaldi ......) and then run slackpkg "install vivaldi ....... tgz", but the app did not work .
I also could not get any LibreOffice versions to install.
I'm lost with my raspberry!
I'm using it with raspibian, because there I have a web browser and a LibreOffice ...
But I wanted to leave slackare installed on it, because on my desktop computer I only use Slackware + XFCE.
Can anyone explain how I convert (Firefox + LibreOffice) from Raspbian to Slackwarm?
Or maybe a version already prepared for Slackwarm in some repository?

Sorry for my "English". This is not my native language.
 
Old 04-10-2018, 11:00 AM   #2
stormtracknole
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MLagoa View Post
After a painful installation of SlackwareARM-14.2 (I am a beginner) using the SARPI installer, I made the lightweight installation procedure = System + XFCE.
However, I did not find any version of web brower (Firefox, Chromium, Vivaldi, etc).
I know that the slackwarearm-14.2 package has konqueror in the KDE package, but I do not want to install this package because it consumes a lot of hardware!
I tried to convert vivaldi-stable.armhf.deb to * .tgz (# alien -t -c vivaldi ......) and then run slackpkg "install vivaldi ....... tgz", but the app did not work .
I also could not get any LibreOffice versions to install.
I'm lost with my raspberry!
I'm using it with raspibian, because there I have a web browser and a LibreOffice ...
But I wanted to leave slackare installed on it, because on my desktop computer I only use Slackware + XFCE.
Can anyone explain how I convert (Firefox + LibreOffice) from Raspbian to Slackwarm?
Or maybe a version already prepared for Slackwarm in some repository?

Sorry for my "English". This is not my native language.
Hi!

So, version 14.2 of Slackware ARM is "soft float". I believe that firefox needs the operating system to be compiled with "hard float". That was only done for -current. I think I got firefox working at one time, and it was just way too slow. I suggest moving to -current. I know, not good news after you just went through an install.
 
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Old 04-10-2018, 07:01 PM   #3
MLagoa
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Okay, stormtracknole. Thanks for answering!
My luck is that there is still a functional desktop at home.
So, I will re-install (using slackwarearm-current).
We still do not have slackwarearm mirrors near my house.
This is getting fun ...
 
Old 04-11-2018, 08:09 PM   #4
MLagoa
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Okay, I installed slackwarm-current and now I have a Firefox browser Quantum 59.0.2
However, the LibreOffice package does not exist in the System installation!

I tried installing from the "sbo" repositories (only found for ARM architecture) using the command "slpkg -s sbo libreoffice", but there were errors in compiling = "arm is unsupported for LibreOffice ..."

Is there an alternative to transfer a ready-made (working) installation of LibreOffice from a microSD raspbian?
Can someone guide me through this procedure?
-------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------- -----

I also noticed a Raspberry overheating running slackwarearm-current and could not install the "xfce4-sensors-plugin" package that exists in slackbuilds to monitor temperature.

Missing /boot/config.txt file (where are the files to activate RTC module and configure gpu_man=64, which were inside that file?)

But these last two issues should remain for a next post...
 
Old 04-12-2018, 04:11 AM   #5
Darth Vader
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MLagoa View Post
Okay, I installed slackwarm-current and now I have a Firefox browser Quantum 59.0.2
However, the LibreOffice package does not exist in the System installation!

I tried installing from the "sbo" repositories (only found for ARM architecture) using the command "slpkg -s sbo libreoffice", but there were errors in compiling = "arm is unsupported for LibreOffice ..."

Is there an alternative to transfer a ready-made (working) installation of LibreOffice from a microSD raspbian?
Can someone guide me through this procedure?
-------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------- -----

I also noticed a Raspberry overheating running slackwarearm-current and could not install the "xfce4-sensors-plugin" package that exists in slackbuilds to monitor temperature.

Missing /boot/config.txt file (where are the files to activate RTC module and configure gpu_man=64, which were inside that file?)

But these last two issues should remain for a next post...
LibreOffice is not part of Slackware, either ARM or x86. In theory, you can try Eric Hameleers recipe to build it for ARM, but I think that trying to building it in a RaspberryPI is pure case of masochism.

Eventually, I suggest you to setup a QUEMU virtual machine, carefully simulating your ARM device, in you desktop computer and to try to build it there. In several weeks will finish, thought. If you aren't lucky to get errors.

In other hand, let's put the things straight: your RaspberryPI device is not supposed to replace your x86 desktop, which is magnitude grades more powerful.

Compared with a x86 computer, your PI is probably like a Pentium III at 500MHz, but with a better video-card. Read: painfully slow and limited as power or resources. Firefox will be really slow and LibreOffice will be epic slow.

Like: you open it when you wake up and go to job, and when you will return in evening, you'll find it ready.

So, I strongly suggest you to not expect and try to replace your x86 desktop with this ARM device.

Last edited by Darth Vader; 04-12-2018 at 04:37 AM.
 
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Old 04-12-2018, 07:01 AM   #6
drmozes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
Compared with a x86 computer, your PI is probably like a Pentium III at 500MHz
When the SheevaPlugs (single core 1.2GHz, no FPU) arrived, one of the guys working on Debian ARM reckoned that it was close to a PIII 700Mhz.

Quote:
, but with a better video-card. Read: painfully slow and limited as power or resources. Firefox will be really slow and LibreOffice will be epic slow.

Like: you open it when you wake up and go to job, and when you will return in evening, you'll find it ready.

So, I strongly suggest you to not expect and try to replace your x86 desktop with this ARM device.
Agreed. Firefox is usable on the Banana Pi, but it'll start to grind with complex web sites. Knowing what LibreOffice was like on x86, I'm not sure it'd fair well on ARM either.
That said, I'm slightly optimistic about the Orange Pi Plus 2E but I need to get the patches in to the kernel to make it useful first.

Last edited by drmozes; 04-12-2018 at 07:04 AM.
 
Old 04-12-2018, 10:23 AM   #7
Darth Vader
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BTW, dear Doctor...

How behave the -current kernel with R40?

I refer to/talk about this device: http://www.banana-pi.org/m2u.html
 
Old 04-12-2018, 10:36 AM   #8
drmozes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
BTW, dear Doctor...

How behave the -current kernel with R40?

I refer to/talk about this device: http://www.banana-pi.org/m2u.html
http://linux-sunxi.org/Linux_mainlining_effort

Look for the red in the table.
 
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Old 04-12-2018, 06:00 PM   #9
MLagoa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
LibreOffice is not part of Slackware, either ARM or x86. In theory, you can try Eric Hameleers recipe to build it for ARM, but I think that trying to building it in a RaspberryPI is pure case of masochism.

Eventually, I suggest you to setup a QUEMU virtual machine, carefully simulating your ARM device, in you desktop computer and to try to build it there. In several weeks will finish, thought. If you aren't lucky to get errors.

In other hand, let's put the things straight: your RaspberryPI device is not supposed to replace your x86 desktop, which is magnitude grades more powerful.

Compared with a x86 computer, your PI is probably like a Pentium III at 500MHz, but with a better video-card. Read: painfully slow and limited as power or resources. Firefox will be really slow and LibreOffice will be epic slow.

Like: you open it when you wake up and go to job, and when you will return in evening, you'll find it ready.

So, I strongly suggest you to not expect and try to replace your x86 desktop with this ARM device.
Okay, Mister... I apreciate the sugestion.
It seems to be extremely painful to work with Raspberry Pi 3 replacing a desktop PC.
But I need it working only with small edits of text, filling in forms, some eventual art in the GIMP, navigation in news sites, etc.
It's a modest job, whitout too much hardware resource demand, which does not justify the wearing down of a connected Desktop PC just for this!
Raspibian performs these tasks reasonably well, with LibreOffice 5.2.7.2, Chromium 60.0 and GIMP 2.8.18 installed on Raspberry Pi 3B, serving the purpose. There is no overheating, there are no crashes (so I asked if you could carry these applications from Raspibian to Slackawearm because the plataform is the same).
But I just wanted to replace Raspbian with Slackwarm because I no like the way it manages the microSD partitions.
And on my PC Desktop I only use Slackware and I really appreciate its performance and I thought it would achieve the same goal with Slackwarm.

Last edited by MLagoa; 04-12-2018 at 06:02 PM.
 
Old 04-12-2018, 07:51 PM   #10
abga
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@MLagoa

Some hints for your Raspberry powered desktop project/quest:

- overheating issue, Pi3B is known to overheat and throttle, Pi3B+ is not better, even with a new " & improved" power supply chip. It's the new development/fashion in the ARM world, to max out the HW and give you good performance in short bursts, no constant performance under sustained load anymore, unless you actively (or passively with a huge heat sink) cool the CPU. Check the Thermal Throttling Benchmark graph:
https://medium.com/@ghalfacree/bench...s-44122cf3d806
There might be some processes that are hammering your CPU and you could investigate this while under XFCE, open a console window and run top / htop together with this useful script (you need to have the vc userland in /opt/vc):
https://github.com/MilhouseVH/bcmstat
Code:
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/MilhouseVH/bcmstat/master/bcmstat.sh
chmod +x bcmstat.sh
./bcmstat.sh A
- LibreOffice is indeed performing very well under Raspian, I've tested it on a PiZero board and was able to do simple editing, spreadsheets & co. That's why I tried to get it compiled, and, unfortunately, due to some technical issues I dropped it. But it was recently picked up by a Slacker who had it built successfully. Check this thread and look for what ddougj is reporting:
https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...546/page3.html

- Web Browser - Firefox is performing pretty well with only one tab open, but if you're looking for an alternative that is lightweight and could perform better, than Chromium is a good choice. Try to use this SlackBuild and get Chromium compiled on your Pi3B board:
https://slackbuilds.org/repository/1...work/chromium/
You might want to optimize the compilation for your Pi3B board and edit the SlackBuild script - the "if [ "$ARCH" = "i586" ]; then " section:
Code:
else
  SLKCFLAGS="-O2"
to
Code:
else
  SLKCFLAGS="-O2 -march=armv8-a+crc -mtune=cortex-a53 -mfpu=neon-fp-armv8 -mfloat-abi=hard"
- /boot/config.txt missing - you can create it on your own, or, if you'd like to start with an existing one (sample), then get it from a current Raspbian image (careful with the cmdline.txt file - you need to remove "init=/usr/lib/raspi-config/init_resize.sh" from it if you need it). You can follow this guide - first instructions section from the Manual installation method:
https://docs.slackware.com/howtos:ha...rm:raspberrypi
Still config.txt related, I suggest to give the GPU at least 128MB RAM, 256MB should be the max you should go for: gpu_mem=256
This might be useful:
https://www.raspberrypi.org/document...-txt/README.md

- video driver (opengl) - not sure if it improves anything performance wise, but you should also try to add this line to your /boot/config.txt:
Code:
dtoverlay=vc4-kms-v3d
reference:
https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...2/#post5811060

Now, if you're still following this Pi3B powered desktop quest, please be a good Slacker and report your progress

Last edited by abga; 04-12-2018 at 07:53 PM. Reason: typo
 
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Old 04-14-2018, 04:27 AM   #11
Darth Vader
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drmozes View Post
http://linux-sunxi.org/Linux_mainlining_effort

Look for the red in the table.
Thank you for link and search suggestion. It was amazing simple to find the R40 column.

Damn, I abandoned several months ago in a corner that thingie. Looks like I should leave it to sleep even more time.
 
Old 04-21-2018, 07:02 PM   #12
MLagoa
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Location: Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abga View Post
@MLagoa

Some hints for your Raspberry powered desktop project/quest:

- overheating issue, Pi3B is known to overheat and throttle, Pi3B+ is not better, even with a new " & improved" power supply chip. It's the new development/fashion in the ARM world, to max out the HW and give you good performance in short bursts, no constant performance under sustained load anymore, unless you actively (or passively with a huge heat sink) cool the CPU. Check the Thermal Throttling Benchmark graph:
https://medium.com/@ghalfacree/bench...s-44122cf3d806
There might be some processes that are hammering your CPU and you could investigate this while under XFCE, open a console window and run top / htop together with this useful script (you need to have the vc userland in /opt/vc):
https://github.com/MilhouseVH/bcmstat
Code:
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/MilhouseVH/bcmstat/master/bcmstat.sh
chmod +x bcmstat.sh
./bcmstat.sh A
- LibreOffice is indeed performing very well under Raspian, I've tested it on a PiZero board and was able to do simple editing, spreadsheets & co. That's why I tried to get it compiled, and, unfortunately, due to some technical issues I dropped it. But it was recently picked up by a Slacker who had it built successfully. Check this thread and look for what ddougj is reporting:
https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...546/page3.html

- Web Browser - Firefox is performing pretty well with only one tab open, but if you're looking for an alternative that is lightweight and could perform better, than Chromium is a good choice. Try to use this SlackBuild and get Chromium compiled on your Pi3B board:
https://slackbuilds.org/repository/1...work/chromium/
You might want to optimize the compilation for your Pi3B board and edit the SlackBuild script - the "if [ "$ARCH" = "i586" ]; then " section:
Code:
else
  SLKCFLAGS="-O2"
to
Code:
else
  SLKCFLAGS="-O2 -march=armv8-a+crc -mtune=cortex-a53 -mfpu=neon-fp-armv8 -mfloat-abi=hard"
- /boot/config.txt missing - you can create it on your own, or, if you'd like to start with an existing one (sample), then get it from a current Raspbian image (careful with the cmdline.txt file - you need to remove "init=/usr/lib/raspi-config/init_resize.sh" from it if you need it). You can follow this guide - first instructions section from the Manual installation method:
https://docs.slackware.com/howtos:ha...rm:raspberrypi
Still config.txt related, I suggest to give the GPU at least 128MB RAM, 256MB should be the max you should go for: gpu_mem=256
This might be useful:
https://www.raspberrypi.org/document...-txt/README.md

- video driver (opengl) - not sure if it improves anything performance wise, but you should also try to add this line to your /boot/config.txt:
Code:
dtoverlay=vc4-kms-v3d
reference:
https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...2/#post5811060

Now, if you're still following this Pi3B powered desktop quest, please be a good Slacker and report your progress
Okay, Abga.
Thank you very much for the explanation of how to solve the problem.
My thinking is to use Raspberry as a light, economical and practical workstation. For small editions of texts, image processing and Internet browsing.
Although I have installed Slackware and ArchLinux on PC's with no problem, I found it extremely complicated to install on Raspberry.

The Sarpi Project provides a means of installing Slackware. However, I miss essential packages prepared for stable version 14.2.

The current version seems to be more complete, with more software available, and uses hard floats. The Sarpi Project presents an installer for the current version, but there is a bug, as it skips dialog steps in the SETUP installation (just in this part: "Now you will see this next screen which tells you there are FAT or NTFS partitions found on your system "), and leave the FAT32 partition visible on my interface workspace, as well as other things that have gone wrong after installing the" current "version.
So I do not want to install an unstable version. My goal in using Slackware is precisely the stability of the System!

For me to follow the above methods and install Firefox and LibreOffice in version 14.2, there is a very steep learning curve, even worse than the difficulties I encountered when installing ArchLinux and Slackware on the PC for the first time.
I have noticed that not even the official distribution of Slacware has been very concerned about the new platform.
ArchLinux also, after a while, removed its ARM version of the NOOBS installer (still possible to find it in the PINN installer). But in this case, the wireless onboard module is not yet officially supported by that distribution ...
So I will provisionally use "Raspbian Lite" and hope that a mature version of Slackware or ArchLinux is ready to run on Raspberry.
Thank you very much for your attention. And sorry for my "English" because it is not my native language.

Last edited by MLagoa; 04-21-2018 at 10:14 PM.
 
Old 04-22-2018, 04:10 AM   #13
Penthux
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MLagoa View Post
The Sarpi Project provides a means of installing Slackware. However, I miss essential packages prepared for stable version 14.2.

The current version seems to be more complete, with more software available, and uses hard floats. The Sarpi Project presents an installer for the current version, but there is a bug, as it skips dialog steps in the SETUP installation (just in this part: "Now you will see this next screen which tells you there are FAT or NTFS partitions found on your system "), and leave the FAT32 partition visible on my interface workspace, as well as other things that have gone wrong after installing the" current "version.


Hi MLagoa,

Be mindful that Slackware [ARM] -current is the development branch (i.e. not the stable version). From time to time there may be changes, modifications, revisions (etc.) in the -current version that are not reflected in the stable version.

It would seem that a lot of users view Slackware ARM -current as just the hard float port of 14.2 and assume that everything is (or should be) identical in every way. However, this is a misconception and, as you might expect, it isn't always the case with software that's subject to constant revision within a developing and testing environment. With that in mind, be aware that Slackware [ARM] -current is the working prototype for the next stable release (e.g. 15.0 in this instance) and when the time arrives for the -current version to become the stable version, the -current version then becomes the development branch for the next stable release. Your opinion that the -current version seems to be more complete, with more software available, is quite accurate because that's exactly how it's intended to be.

It needs to be said that SARPi is not officially supported or endorsed by Slackware Linux Inc. Another common misconception is that SARPi is in some way 'official'. It isn't and will never be.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MLagoa View Post
So I do not want to install an unstable version. My goal in using Slackware is precisely the stability of the System!
Then install and run the stable version (i.e. 14.2) and be patient for the release of Slackware ARM 15.0. With the -current development branch, what you expect is not always what you get.

-----

<edit> You can still (re)boot the RPi2/3 without mounting the FAT32 /boot partition during Slackware ARM -current setup. If you wish to mount the /boot partition at boot time you can add the /etc/fstab entry manually. To achieve this, follow the Slackware ARM setup procedure all the way through and just before you "reboot" at the end of the setup process, use this line:

Code:
echo "/dev/mmcblk0p1   /boot            vfat        fmask=177,dmask=077 1   0" >> /mnt/etc/fstab
Now when you (re)boot the device your FAT32 /boot partition will be mounted, just like it is in Slackware ARM 14.2

<edit #2> You might have to use 'reboot -f' in order to reboot successfully.

Last edited by Penthux; 04-22-2018 at 04:37 AM. Reason: i skipped breakfast :/
 
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Old 04-22-2018, 09:58 AM   #14
MLagoa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penthux View Post
Hi MLagoa,

Be mindful that Slackware [ARM] -current is the development branch (i.e. not the stable version). From time to time there may be changes, modifications, revisions (etc.) in the -current version that are not reflected in the stable version.

It would seem that a lot of users view Slackware ARM -current as just the hard float port of 14.2 and assume that everything is (or should be) identical in every way. However, this is a misconception and, as you might expect, it isn't always the case with software that's subject to constant revision within a developing and testing environment. With that in mind, be aware that Slackware [ARM] -current is the working prototype for the next stable release (e.g. 15.0 in this instance) and when the time arrives for the -current version to become the stable version, the -current version then becomes the development branch for the next stable release. Your opinion that the -current version seems to be more complete, with more software available, is quite accurate because that's exactly how it's intended to be.
Okay, Penthux.
So there are no packages of Chromium or Firefox browsers and there is also no LibreOficce prepared to run under the Slackware version ARM 14.2 stable?
I noticed that we have Caligra and Konqueror running on the KDE interface when we install this environment on the ARM platform, but I do not want to install KDE because I consider it a heavy environment (I've always used XFCE in Slackware and I really like that fully customizable interface).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Penthux View Post
It needs to be said that SARPi is not officially supported or endorsed by Slackware Linux Inc. Another common misconception is that SARPi is in some way 'official'. It isn't and will never be.

Then install and run the stable version (i.e. 14.2) and be patient for the release of Slackware ARM 15.0. With the -current development branch, what you expect is not always what you get.
The hope is that the current version stabilizes soon and so we have a stable and functional system, just as it is version 14.2 for PC Desktop.
Thanks for listening!
 
Old 04-22-2018, 11:55 AM   #15
abga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MLagoa View Post
Okay, Abga.
Thank you very much for the explanation of how to solve the problem.
My thinking is to use Raspberry as a light, economical and practical workstation. For small editions of texts, image processing and Internet browsing.
Although I have installed Slackware and ArchLinux on PC's with no problem, I found it extremely complicated to install on Raspberry.
Have a look on this recent thread discussing the use of an ARM board for desktop usage.
https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...om-4175627658/

As Penthux explained, the Raspberry PI platform is not officially supported by Slackware, but only by the community. That doesn't mean it does not work well and you already mentioned that you have used the SARPi method. There's also a manual installation method, that is very simple to follow, comprised of not even half a page of simple Linux instructions:
https://docs.slackware.com/howtos:ha...rm:raspberrypi
What is not detailed there, is how to obtain the Slackware ARM installation tree, that's in case you want to install it from an external USB flash drive (I'd recommend this method), but you can follow the rsync instructions from this page:
https://arm.slackware.com/getslack/
- for the stable Slackware ARM 14.2 you'll need to use "ftp.slackware.uk::slackwarearm/slackwarearm-14.2/ ."
Once you prepared your SDCard (don't forget to correct the /boot/cmdline.txt) and boot the Raspberry Pi for the first time, change the root password, mount the external USB drive with your Slackware ARM installation tree, go in the folder slackware and then one by one enter the a / ap / d ... folders (except k, kde ,kdei) and issue in each folder:
Code:
installpkg *.txz
Once done, reboot your Pi and configure your time/network/mouse by issuing:
Code:
timeconfig
netconfig
mouseconfig
It's that simple!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MLagoa View Post
For me to follow the above methods and install Firefox and LibreOffice in version 14.2, there is a very steep learning curve, even worse than the difficulties I encountered when installing ArchLinux and Slackware on the PC for the first time.
Firefox is already included in Slackware ARM, however LibreOffice is not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MLagoa View Post
So I will provisionally use "Raspbian Lite" and hope that a mature version of Slackware or ArchLinux is ready to run on Raspberry.
Raspbian is the official distribution that is constantly optimized to run very well on the Raspberry Pi boards, no other distribution will put that much effort in the optimization, but only in the support of the Raspberry Pi boards.

Last edited by abga; 04-22-2018 at 09:54 PM. Reason: tgz => txz
 
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