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Old 05-13-2006, 05:38 AM   #1
BobNutfield
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xorg.conf to run X in two different Slack Kernels


Hi Everyone,

I have two kernels in Slack 10.2 and use the nVidia driver for the most recent kernel (2.6.16.5). I also have 2.4.31, which I really like becuase it is so stable. However, when I installed the new kernel with the new kernel-dedicated nVidia driver, it uninstalled it from the 2.4.31 kernel (which I expected) and while I can boot into the 2.4 kernel, I cannot start X.

My question is, is there a "generic" X driver, like vesa, that I can change the xorg.conf file to which will allow me to start X in the older kernel as well as the new one?

Any help appreciated.

Bob
 
Old 05-13-2006, 07:55 AM   #2
egag
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there is a trick to save the nvidea-module for your 2.4 kernel
while installing it for 2.6, but i can't tell you how
( someone else will, i guess...)

untill then, you can change " driver nvidea" to "driver nv" in
your xorg.conf file.
( the "nv" driver comes with xorg )

egag
 
Old 05-13-2006, 08:45 AM   #3
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobNutfield
I have two kernels in Slack 10.2 and use the nVidia driver for the most recent kernel (2.6.16.5). I also have 2.4.31, which I really like becuase it is so stable. However, when I installed the new kernel with the new kernel-dedicated nVidia driver, it uninstalled it from the 2.4.31 kernel (which I expected) and while I can boot into the 2.4 kernel, I cannot start X.
Easily fixed. Substitute your version numbers for these commands:

1. # NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-8756-pkg1.run --extract-only

2. # cd NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-8756-pkg1/usr/src/nv

3. # make clean && make install

4. Reboot into other kernel (at runlevel 3)

5. # cd NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-8756-pkg1/usr/src/nv

6. # make clean && make install

Now you should have the NVidia module for both kernels.

There is another way you can do this without rebooting:

# make SYSSRC=/usr/src/linux-2.4.31 module

But I've never done it.

Last edited by rkelsen; 05-13-2006 at 08:48 AM.
 
Old 05-13-2006, 04:43 PM   #4
BobNutfield
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Thanks, guys for the responses. I was concerned that both kernels shared the same xorg.conf file, but apprently if you can install the nVidia driver in each kernel they must have their own xorg files.

I'll try your suggestion.

Thanks very much

Bob
 
Old 05-13-2006, 05:53 PM   #5
soggycornflake
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There's no need to do all that manually. You can use the -K option when installing the second driver to only install the kernel module. This will leave all the other stuff alone, including any any other kernel modules.

xorg.conf is part of X, it has nothing to do with the kernel. You will be using the same xorg.conf when using both kernels, which is no problem since you have the same hardware.
 
Old 05-13-2006, 06:52 PM   #6
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobNutfield
Thanks, guys for the responses. I was concerned that both kernels shared the same xorg.conf file, but apprently if you can install the nVidia driver in each kernel they must have their own xorg files.
Just re-iterating what Soggycornflake said: You can use the same xorg.conf file for both kernels. There is no need to have more than one file.
 
Old 05-13-2006, 08:14 PM   #7
sasho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobNutfield
Thanks, guys for the responses. I was concerned that both kernels shared the same xorg.conf file, but apprently if you can install the nVidia driver in each kernel they must have their own xorg files.
You will have a module for each kernel, and only one xorg.conf.
nvidia.o for 2.4.31, nvidia.ko for the 2.6.* kernel.
 
Old 05-14-2006, 03:26 AM   #8
BobNutfield
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I hope I don't sound too noobish here, but my concern is that the 2.4.31 kernel uses a different version of the nVidia driver than the 2.6.16 kernel. Am I understanding that if I install the 2.4.31 version using the -K option, it will simply load that module into the 2.4.31 kernel, leaving the module for the 2.6.16 kernel untouched? There won't be any conflicts?

Thanks,

Bob
 
Old 05-14-2006, 04:40 AM   #9
soggycornflake
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It's still the same driver, it's only the interface to the kernel that changes.

The full install comprises the kernel module, the X module, and the GL library(ies). The -K option installs only the kernel module, so the other components won't be touched at all, including any kernel modules for different kernels. This option is specifically intended to support using mulitple kernels, so there won't be any conflicts.
 
Old 05-14-2006, 04:43 AM   #10
cwwilson721
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soggycornflake
It's still the same driver, it's only the interface to the kernel that changes.

The full install comprises the kernel module, the X module, and the GL library(ies). The -K option installs only the kernel module, so the other components won't be touched at all, including any kernel modules for different kernels. This option is specifically intended to support using mulitple kernels, so there won't be any conflicts.
To explain a little farther:
The modules for different kernels are store in different folders, so one module for one kernel won't be read/used by another kernel
 
Old 05-14-2006, 06:48 AM   #11
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobNutfield
Am I understanding that if I install the 2.4.31 version using the -K option, it will simply load that module into the 2.4.31 kernel, leaving the module for the 2.6.16 kernel untouched? There won't be any conflicts?
If you follow the instructions in post #3, you will have the NVidia kernel module for both kernels and there will not be any conflicts. You can't load two kernels at once, so why should there be a conflict. All you're doing is building a kernel module for each kernel...
 
Old 05-14-2006, 01:40 PM   #12
BobNutfield
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Thanks for your help, guys. Very much appreciated.

Bob
 
Old 05-14-2006, 01:54 PM   #13
Alien Bob
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When I want to compile and install the NVIDIA kernel module for a kernel, and don't want to remove any previously installed NVIDIA modules (other versions and/or for other kernels) I run this command (example uses the driver version 7676 and a kernel 2.6.13 - you substitute your own particular versions, and perhaps your kernel sources are in another directory, too):

Code:
sh NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-7676-pkg1.run --kernel-name=2.6.13 \
           --kernel-module-only \
           --kernel-source-path=/usr/src/linux-2.6.13
Eric
 
Old 05-15-2006, 02:19 PM   #14
BobNutfield
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Thanks for your help. Once again, I ask, I learn. I ran the command that Alien Bob suggested and it worked like a charm. I can get into X in both kernels now. One oddity, though. I cannot start KDE from the command

startkde

When I startx, it defaults into window maker (which I do not like) and I don't seem to be able to switch it back to kde as the default desktop when I type startx. I also cannot start a network connection from the 2.4.31 kernel anymore.

None of these things are any big deal, really. I mainly use the 2.6.16 kernel ansyway. I just liked the 2.4.31 kernel because it was so stable. And, as silly as it sounds, it was my first Slack kernel and I want to keep it just for that reason.

Anyway, thanks very much for all of your help. If anyone knows how to fix the other two niggling little things, I'd appreciate it.

Thanks

Bob
 
Old 05-15-2006, 04:06 PM   #15
Alien Bob
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You should not need to start KDE using the command "startkde".
What you should do is run the command
Code:
xwmconfig
and select KDE as your default window manager - and henceforth just use
Code:
startx
to start X - running KDE.

As to why you don't get a network connection now in your 2.4 kernel - perhaps because the driver for the network card was loaded in /etc/rc.d/rc.modules and that one got replaced when you installed a Slackware 2.6 kernel from "/testing" ?

Eric
 
  


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