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View Poll Results: What is Slackware's most enduring virtue?
SlackBuilds / The ability to compile from source 58 34.32%
BSD-style init system 65 38.46%
It just works! 124 73.37%
Text-based installer 36 21.30%
Other (comment in posts below) 21 12.43%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 169. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-26-2019, 06:34 AM   #181
luvr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ttk View Post
I confess to using both when I need a root shell :-)

$ sudo su -
#
That's what I used to do, too, until I found out that there's a simpler way:
Code:
sudo -i
 
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Old 06-27-2019, 01:30 PM   #182
ttk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luvr View Post
That's what I used to do, too, until I found out that there's a simpler way:
Code:
sudo -i
Thanks for the tip :-)

I ran a quick exercise to see if the two commands resulted in the same environment, and they're pretty close:

http://ciar.org/h/sudo_i_vs_sudo_su.txt

I think the MAIL difference is a bug I should rectify, and I've overlooked setting LC_ALL=C in root's .bashrc. Once that's done, the environments will be even closer.
 
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Old 07-27-2019, 11:00 PM   #183
DracoSentien
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Registered: May 2019
Location: Orange New York
Distribution: Slackware-current
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I started using Linux in 1997. I think I heard about it in hacker channels on IRC first. I first installed Redhat (Hurricane) in 1997 I think it came with a book I bought or maybe it was a library book. I used Redhat until the (Manhattan) release and never really liked it. After that I downloaded Debian Slink on 56k modem to a fat windows disk. It took forever to Download and once I got it downloaded I installed it from the windows partition using the vfat kernel module and the dual boot system. The default manager or desktop in Debian slink was Window Maker and I had to compile a kernel just to get sound to work (that should tell you how long ago it was) Then about 2001 I changed to FreeBSD then eventually NetBSD. Then around 2010 it was OpenBSD mostly. I tried Slackware around 2001 but it was too much a pain in the ass for me then before my *BSD experiences.

I use Slackware on my laptop right now for no other reason than OpenBSD and FreeBSD don't fully support my hardware e.g. I have an Atheros QCA9377 wireless card.

With this new laptop I tried Fedora 30, Debian, MxLinux, Debian Buster, and Arch Linux but Slackware is the most Unix-like or most like FreeBSD and OpenBSD so that is why I use it right now on my laptop as we speak.

Last edited by DracoSentien; 07-27-2019 at 11:04 PM.
 
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Old 07-28-2019, 12:59 AM   #184
oddius_oddone
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Registered: Dec 2018
Location: Hawaii
Distribution: Slackware 14.2, Slackware -current, Zorin 12.4
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To know why I use Slackware it's important to know why I started using Linux;
I've had some experience with Linux since around 2006 or so when I used our school's Ubuntu equipped computers. I'm not sure which version, but I liked how simple it was. I continued to play around with Linux as time allowed, but I didn't make the full jump until 2014 with the fustercluck that is Windows 10. I started with Ubuntu (like a lot of Linux users) and from there I moved to Fedora, Debian, Centos, Arch, Zorin, OpenSUSE, Devuan and even a short run with Gentoo. While I liked Linux I knew something was missing, and I never really found a distro that clicked. Then I started going deeper down the rabbit hole and started disliking the Windows-ification of distros like Fedora and Ubuntu where things were constantly obfuscated and hidden from users. My horrible experience with systemD (where it would simply hang, and bug reports were given the 'not a bug wontfix') was the final straw and I looked for a distro that was stable, didn't have systemD, granted the user full control, was lightweight, and above all simple to manage. As you all know Slackware checks out in spades in those categories. So I created a VM, at this point I was back to Devuan as it met most of that criteria, and upon seeing that text installer I knew I was hooked.

A year later I have Slackware on both of my machines and have yet to have even the smallest issue with it. I continue to use Slackware because it's stable (Devuan had internet issues, so circa early 2018 it failed this criteria), doesn't have systemD, grants me the user control to do whatever I wish or don't wish with my machine, is lightweight, and is simple to manage in day to day use. I'm currently a senior in college with three other Linux users and they have had issues with their Debian, Mint and Arch installs while my Slackware install trucks along.
 
Old 07-28-2019, 01:10 AM   #185
1337_powerslacker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DracoSentien View Post
I tried Slackware around 2001 but it was too much a pain in the ass for me then before my *BSD experiences...Slackware is the most Unix-like or most like FreeBSD and OpenBSD...
That was similar to my experience.. I was using FreeBSD and admired its simple init system and the rc.* scripts. I wanted something in Linux land that was as easy for me. I searched for a Linux most like *BSD, and Slackware was one of the top results. I clicked on the link, downloaded it (10.2 I believe) and have been a believer ever since. Most of my computers run Slackware (with exceptions for some retro computers). I will never use another distro, since Slackware fulfills my needs so completely. Certainly I have no need to migrate elsewhere.
 
Old 07-28-2019, 08:08 AM   #186
slackware-current
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I use Slackware it is cheap and free. The source code is there so I can fix the stuff they rarely seem to fix.
It it seems to work 89 percent better than most out of the box.
Customization is a plus.
 
Old 07-28-2019, 09:36 AM   #187
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by slackware-current View Post
I use Slackware it is cheap and free. The source code is there so I can fix the stuff they rarely seem to fix.
It it seems to work 89 percent better than most out of the box.
Customization is a plus.
Would you care to share what you had to fix? We do get Slackware64 changelog notices and corrections.

My experiences with Slackware are that it is a stable,usable distribution. Sure sometimes I will need to tweak for hardware specific needs but that is not a big problem most of the time. Sometimes I may find a lack of a driver for new hardware but of late that has not been a problem because I am not upgrading to latest and greatest since my retirement restricts that.

I do miss my University LAB days where I could get the latest via my budget allotments. Always easier to use other's money to get the new toys!

Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy Slackware!
 
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Old 07-28-2019, 11:16 AM   #188
ChuangTzu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackware-current View Post
I use Slackware it is cheap and free. The source code is there so I can fix the stuff they rarely seem to fix.
It it seems to work 89 percent better than most out of the box.
Customization is a plus.
PV would be grateful for that donation. Your cheap and free distro is his livelihood.
Support Slackware: https://paypal.me/volkerdi
 
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Old 07-31-2019, 02:38 PM   #189
automaticjerk
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Registered: Apr 2015
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I use Slackware for all of those reasons, plus PUNK ROCK.

MAYHEM!
ANARCHY!

BSD init would be a close second.
 
Old 08-04-2019, 09:37 AM   #190
poetgrant
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Why I use Slackware

I started my Linux journey with Slackware. After distro-hopping for 4-5 years and using elementaryOS for about 3 years, I am back on Slackware. Part of the reason is because of the major issues I've had with systemd and the complexification of my own computers because of the contributions of Ubuntu and other distros. I switched back to Slackware nearly 8 months ago and don't remember why I ever left.

Slackware is simple. Slackware is easy. It is extremely understandable. It reminds me of all the possibilities that computing provides and makes me feel like I can literally do anything. In my honest opinion, scripts > systemd. yeah... systemd is honestly my main reason I think. Well, that and the horrid experience I've had with apt and yum and all the other package managers. I like to be in control of my own computers.

So I guess that's my reason. There are plenty of others, like my preference for CLI apps and extremely slimmed down (RAM-wise) systems. I like simplicity, and that's Slackware.

Cheers!
 
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Old 08-04-2019, 09:50 AM   #191
hazel
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+1 to most of that. Though I must say that when I used Debian, I never had any trouble with the apt system. Most of the time it just purrs along. But when it does go wrong (as it did for an AntiX-using friend of mine), it's a pig to put right again, so I can see the logic of not building dependencies into the system.

I too find Slackware simple, friendly and easy to understand.
 
Old 08-04-2019, 09:55 AM   #192
poetgrant
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
+1 to most of that. Though I must say that when I used Debian, I never had any trouble with the apt system. Most of the time it just purrs along. But when it does go wrong (as it did for an AntiX-using friend of mine), it's a pig to put right again, so I can see the logic of not building dependencies into the system.
My main problem with apt was that installing one package subsequently installed others that were not hard deps. They added Desktop entries in my 'app list', which annoyed me.

The worst one was when I uninstalled Firefox it installed something else. I think it was Epiphany. I just wanted Falkon, but could remove Epiphany without apt autoinstalling Firefox and vice versa. I think that was the straw that broke the camel's back.
 
Old 08-04-2019, 10:03 AM   #193
hazel
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Those things happen when you have installed a desktop environment and it brought a cloud of applications along with it. As I don't like DE's, I never ran into a problem like that.

Installing things that aren't hard dependencies can sometimes be due to your apt.conf file including "recommends". I hate those; they really are intrusive.
 
Old 08-08-2019, 09:50 PM   #194
demifiend
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Registered: Aug 2019
Location: USA
Distribution: Slackware
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Why Slackware?

All of the reasons in the poll are valid in my case, but there's a bit more to the story. Back in 2016 I had a secondhand ThinkPad T430s as my personal laptop, even though it was "old and busted". It still worked fine, especially after I took it apart, blew out the dust, upgraded the RAM, replaced the battery, and swapped out the original HDD for a SSD of equal capacity. When I discovered that I could run OpenBSD on it, I was happy to leave Linux behind after twenty years of distro hopping. My first exposure to Unix was on a SPARCstation running SunOS (a BSD derivative), and I had come back to BSD decades later.

Then my wife's Macbook crapped out, and she wanted a machine with a better keyboard. She tried my T430s and found she liked it just fine, as long as she didn't have to be the sysadmin.

This left me without a computer until I got my hands on a used ThinkPad T60. I refurbished it as I did the T430s, but try as I might I couldn't get the built-in AR5418 wifi chipset to work on OpenBSD. While I could have replaced it with an Intel wifi card, I didn't want to open up the T60 a second time when the wifi worked under Linux, but not OpenBSD.

I tried Debian for a few weeks, before cleaning out my closet and discovering a 4CD Slackware 8.0 distribution that I had forgotten that I had (along with FreeBSD 4.3 and Neverwinter Nights). I was tempted to try installing Slackware 8, but decided to grab 14.2 instead. I figured that if I needed to migrate to -current to get up-to-date versions of Firefox and Emacs, it would be easier if I started with the latest stable release.

Lo and behold! after reading the documentation and updating stable using slackpkg, I had the current versions of Firefox and Emacs that I wanted without migrating to -current, so I'm happily using 14.2 and building additional packages like quodlibet and mu/mu4e using the SBo repository.

I don't remember why I didn't stick with Slackware back in the day, but I don't plan on repeating my mistake.
 
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