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Old 10-11-2018, 01:25 PM   #181
hitest
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Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevendogsbsd View Post
1. Why did you stop using Slackware?

I stopped using Slackware because I find the package management technology clumsy and difficult to use. I also have not been successfully able to every get my video hardware working with Slackware and the fact I apparently must create an xorg.conf (according to the docs) is ridiculous when xorg.conf has not been required for several years (https://docs.slackware.com/howtos:ha...aphics_drivers). Even the times I have switched to FreeBSD, Xorg works perfectly with Nvidia and no xorg.conf.

EDIT: I have misspoken: apparently you do not need a single xorg.conf, which is deprecated, but you can use individual .conf files under /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d. This is the same behavior as other Linux distros and FreeBSD.
I can appreciate these sentiments. On occasion I get frustrated running Slackware and drift away to another operating system. I recently ran Debian 9 on an old T410 Thinkpad; I became frustrated with software issues in Slackware. After beating my head against these issues I asked for help here at LQ. With the patient help of several kind members I was able to resolve my issues. I continue to be a proud Slacker (I started with version 10.0). I am running Slackware64-current on all of my units. One of my work stations has an OpenBSD partition.
If you can provide an accurate description of your issues and or error messages it has been my experience that the Slackers here at LQ are happy to provide guidance.
 
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Old 10-11-2018, 01:41 PM   #182
sevendogsbsd
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Thanks for the reply hitest - I am happily running openSUSE but because of mainly political and (probably theoretical [as in my head]) reasons, I have considered switching to a non-systemd distro or back to FreeBSD. FreeBSD as an operating system is simply amazing, as a desktop, not so much, although there are plenty of people running it as such. It just takes a lot of work to get everything functional, and even then, not everything works (desktop wise) as advertised. It would also be a big step back in time for me in terms of software innovation (kde4 vice plasma).

I have grown used to having a beautiful (subjective), polished desktop where everything just works and the only effort I have to do to keep it running is push the power button and run my updates every week or so.

Philosophically, I despise systemd because it violates so many fundamental software development concepts, plus the Unix "keep it simple" philosophy. But...it just works, or at least for me. The current turmoil surrounding the Linux kernel and Linus's departure (hiatus), make me wonder what the future holds, but...Linux will go on. The Internet and millions of business servers (and us!) depend on it.

I may give Slack another chance in a VM to get familiar with maintenance, etc. I won't be able to use nvidia, but the docs seem pretty straight forward on nvidia so if I choose to try on bare metal again and have issues, I'll reach out for help.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 10-11-2018, 05:39 PM   #183
ChuangTzu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevendogsbsd View Post
Thanks for the reply hitest - I am happily running openSUSE but because of mainly political and (probably theoretical [as in my head]) reasons, I have considered switching to a non-systemd distro or back to FreeBSD. FreeBSD as an operating system is simply amazing, as a desktop, not so much, although there are plenty of people running it as such. It just takes a lot of work to get everything functional, and even then, not everything works (desktop wise) as advertised. It would also be a big step back in time for me in terms of software innovation (kde4 vice plasma).

I have grown used to having a beautiful (subjective), polished desktop where everything just works and the only effort I have to do to keep it running is push the power button and run my updates every week or so.

Philosophically, I despise systemd because it violates so many fundamental software development concepts, plus the Unix "keep it simple" philosophy. But...it just works, or at least for me. The current turmoil surrounding the Linux kernel and Linus's departure (hiatus), make me wonder what the future holds, but...Linux will go on. The Internet and millions of business servers (and us!) depend on it.

I may give Slack another chance in a VM to get familiar with maintenance, etc. I won't be able to use nvidia, but the docs seem pretty straight forward on nvidia so if I choose to try on bare metal again and have issues, I'll reach out for help.

Thanks again.
Your seat at the table of Slack was never filled, name tag is still there as well.
 
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Old 10-11-2018, 06:40 PM   #184
mralk3
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I am back on Slackware-current after the last few months of running CentOS and Fedora. I think I have learned all there is to learn about RPM distributions. It was my first honest attempt to run a systemd distribution since before I became a Slacker in 2015. It was annoying that nearly all administrative tasks on the system involved systemctl or journalctl. I didn't run into any issues with SELinux aside from enabling access to a different port for SSHD. Yum has quite a nice roll back feature for botched installations, or if you simply change your mind about needing that one piece of obscure software installed from EPEL.

This is an interesting thread for me. I now know what it is like on the corporate side opposite to Slackware and K.I.S.S. Everyone just wants things to work with little effort. While the responses of some in this thread are valid opinions, I cannot help but notice a recurring theme. Most people switching from Slackware to another distribution lack patience or know how to accomplish what they wish with their Slackware system. They want their computer to do things for them, rather than to make their computer do things for them.

My brief hiatus felt a bit traitorous on my part. It was only 2 months, please forgive me my fellow Slackers!

 
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Old 10-11-2018, 06:49 PM   #185
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mralk3 View Post
My brief hiatus felt a bit traitorous on my part. It was only 2 months, please forgive me my fellow Slackers!
I know the feeling. I've felt a bit blasphemous myself as of late. Nothing to forgive mate, it's all good. I always enjoy Slackware all the more after a detour off road.
 
Old 10-11-2018, 06:54 PM   #186
mralk3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hitest View Post
I know the feeling. I've felt a bit blasphemous myself as of late. Nothing to forgive mate, it's all good. I always enjoy Slackware all the more after a detour off road.
It is funny how I installed all the same things I do on Slackware. Yesterday I came to this realization and that prompted my switch back. There are some conveniences I will miss about CentOS, but not convenient enough to keep me interested. My curiosities about the happenings in the rest Linux world have been quenched.
 
Old 10-11-2018, 07:09 PM   #187
phalange
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mralk3 View Post
They want their computer to do things for them, rather than to make their computer do things for them.
Well put. This captures it and in a sense, also captures what Linux is up against as a whole. I think many users stick with Mac and Windows because the idea of doing anything at all - including seeing the horror of a terminal window - is too much. Fedora and other distros have made an effort to combat the perception that 'Linux is complicated' with a user experience that aims to be dead simple. The compromise is that advanced users may find it either boring or irritating to ride with training wheels.

Thankfully, many distros exist that challenge and excite (like Slackware), and I bear no ill-will toward those that are making inroads with users who wish to never see a terminal in their lives. I think more Linux users overall is good even if they have vastly different expectations.
 
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Old 10-11-2018, 08:28 PM   #188
noordinaryspider
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Distribution: Debian Stable, ConnochaetOS (free as in freedom 32-bit Slackware), Uruk, Trisquel, Damn Small Linux
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I left about a decadeish ago because I was insecure about what other people thought of my choice of leisure activities. I thought Ubuntu would be "easier" and take less time away from family and career responsibilities.

I was sorely mistaken. Bumbling into Slackware as a clueless newbie in 2005 is what made me who I am and that's nothing to be ashamed of. I tried an Arch derivative for awhile and loved it until an update broke X and I was never able to get any Arch derivative to work again.

Yesterday I popped Slack (actually https://connochaetos.org/wiki/ because I don't like the non-free stuff but I'm lazy) on, remembered how much I loved it, found the packages I needed and popped them right on with installpkg.

Slack makes sense. Mandrake just frustrated me in '05 so it didn't last long and iOS was even worse in '15 when I was trying to help my dad with his tablet.

If that means I'm weird, then so be it.
 
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Old 10-12-2018, 06:07 AM   #189
lightbulbjim
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Oops, replied to the wrong thread .

But if I did leave, it would be because updating stuff via sbopkg is getting old. I groan every time I see a QT5 update available. It's like running Gentoo's revdep-rebuild manually .

Last edited by lightbulbjim; 10-12-2018 at 06:09 AM.
 
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Old 10-12-2018, 06:17 AM   #190
Lysander666
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noordinaryspider View Post
I left about a decadeish ago because I was insecure about what other people thought of my choice of leisure activities.
People have always found my choice of leisure activities questionable, so I suppose Slackware fits right in there. Having said that, I'm not really one for changing something because other people don't like it or don't approve.
 
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Old 10-12-2018, 11:31 AM   #191
Gordie
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I left for good at least a couple of times now. Maybe more but that is in the distant past.
I didn't leave Slackware so much as I left Linux. Those days you had to create bootdisks on floppy using loadlin or something like that. Linux wasn't very polished looking compared to Windows and software was lacking. Compiling from source was the way to get software.
Slackware was one of only a few distros available and I remember Red Hat, Debian, SuSE,Slackware.

Things have changed
 
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Old 10-12-2018, 01:26 PM   #192
sevendogsbsd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phalange View Post
Well put. This captures it and in a sense, also captures what Linux is up against as a whole. I think many users stick with Mac and Windows because the idea of doing anything at all - including seeing the horror of a terminal window - is too much. Fedora and other distros have made an effort to combat the perception that 'Linux is complicated' with a user experience that aims to be dead simple. The compromise is that advanced users may find it either boring or irritating to ride with training wheels.

Thankfully, many distros exist that challenge and excite (like Slackware), and I bear no ill-will toward those that are making inroads with users who wish to never see a terminal in their lives. I think more Linux users overall is good even if they have vastly different expectations.
Good post and good points, including quoted. I "grew up" on Linux back in the Gnome 1 days and Gentoo stage 1 days. Used both for some time. After 20 years of work to get my computer to do something for me, I have opted to use a "just works" distro, not because I do not have the capability, but because when I want to use my computer to edit photos, or write, it need it to boot and work without work on my part. It also need to update without much work on my part. I do enjoy updating (am I sick?!) so do all updates via a terminal and have disabled the "auto update" feature.

Been down the Mac road and hated it. Been down the Windows road and still hate it. I don't mind doing SOME maintenance, but I don't want to engage at the level I used to.

The GOOD thing about Linux in any form, is that we as end users have choices, unlike Mac and Windows where the end user has zero choice. Slackware or not, we also have a community, albeit filled with little internal wars ("My distro is better than yours!") but I think this is just what comes with a bunch of geeks and a big IT party

'Nuff said!
 
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Old 10-12-2018, 02:36 PM   #193
montagdude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lightbulbjim View Post
But if I did leave, it would be because updating stuff via sbopkg is getting old. I groan every time I see a QT5 update available. It's like running Gentoo's revdep-rebuild manually .
You think that's bad, try building Chromium. I'm doing it now for the first time (using Alien Bob's SlackBuild with one small additional patch) and it looks like it's going to take close to a day on my quad-core Thinkpad. I just hope the patch I made actually results in the desired behavior...

On the other hand, no one is forcing me to build this from source, but I'm glad Slackware (and Alien Bob in this case) makes it so easy to do so. The same applies to Qt5.

Last edited by montagdude; 10-12-2018 at 02:37 PM.
 
Old 10-12-2018, 02:57 PM   #194
sevendogsbsd
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Mildly off-topic: I used to build Chromium on Gentoo and FreeBSD - takes about an hour/1.2 on my beast PC but it pegs all 24 cores and the fans kind of ramp up. Gave up on Chromium and went back to Firefox. Binary.
 
Old 10-12-2018, 03:01 PM   #195
montagdude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevendogsbsd View Post
Mildly off-topic: I used to build Chromium on Gentoo and FreeBSD - takes about an hour/1.2 on my beast PC but it pegs all 24 cores and the fans kind of ramp up. Gave up on Chromium and went back to Firefox. Binary.
Alien Bob offers a binary for Chromium, which I had installed previously, but I'm building from source now because I wanted to patch it.

Last edited by montagdude; 10-12-2018 at 03:02 PM. Reason: Add link
 
  


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