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Old 04-16-2018, 08:10 PM   #16
abga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
BTW, I think we all do wrong with our ARM thingies...

These ARM devices was designed for Android, and it install essentially as a live system. Maybe the Linux-live from SD-card will do considerable better.

Remember that the transfers from filesystem will be compressed.
The main thing you need to care about on these ARM boards is to protect the SDCard, which, unfortunately, is the main storage device by default. You'll need persistent storage for your work, configurations, maybe some logs, etc. and then the only option is to take care about the processes that are hammering the card, not really difficult after all. A live image might be OK for desktop usage, together with an USB stick to save the work, but not for hacking and compiling and enjoying Slackware
Yep, these ARM processors were firstly designed for mobile devices, but I'm happy that I can run a full Linux distro on them now. Android is an already "castrated" and utterly inflexible OS, even if you root it.
 
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Old 04-17-2018, 07:30 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abga View Post
The main thing you need to care about on these ARM boards is to protect the SDCard,
This is one of the reasons why all of the supported ARM devices in Slackware are documented as installing the OS to an eSATA hard drive or USB hard drive.

Quote:
Yep, these ARM processors were firstly designed for mobile devices,
ARM was firstly designed for desktop machines, actually!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acorn_Archimedes
 
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Old 04-17-2018, 08:26 AM   #18
Darth Vader
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All hail for our good British Doctor, who had the kindness to jump in this thread!

I dare to say, there is no more skilled and entitled person than him, to respond to OP's dilemmas about a small ARM desktop sporting our beloved Slackware as OS...
 
Old 04-17-2018, 08:32 AM   #19
drmozes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
All hail for our good British Doctor, who had the kindness to jump in this thread!
I'm not British.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
I dare to say, there is no more skilled and entitled person than him, to respond to OP's dilemmas about a small ARM desktop sporting our beloved Slackware as OS...
I should get you to be my publicist!

Last edited by drmozes; 04-17-2018 at 12:12 PM.
 
Old 04-17-2018, 03:37 PM   #20
abga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drmozes View Post
ARM was firstly designed for desktop machines, actually!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acorn_Archimedes
Thanks for the history lesson, indeed the first ARM was actually a coprocessor:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARM_architecture#History
These ARM CPUs/SoCs became known/popular here in Europe when they first appeared in mobile/portable/embedded devices and became the core preoccupation/business of Arm Holdings, only recently developing desktop/server grade multicore CPUs, well, until it got sold to the Japanese:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARM_Holdings#Technology

Quote:
Originally Posted by drmozes View Post
This is one of the reasons why all of the supported ARM devices in Slackware are documented as installing the OS to an eSATA hard drive or USB hard drive.
You're right, I'm always forgetting that there are only a very few officially supported ARM devices in Slackware ARM. A SATA (eSATA) connection and an external HarDrive is definitely helping a lot.

@ZhaoLin1457
In my post #8 I suggested to get a cheap (around 50USD - all included - case&power adapter&SDCard) Raspberry Pi 3B or 3B+ and give it a try as a desktop alternative. Unfortunately, I forgot that the Raspberry Pi boards are not officially Supported by Slackware ARM, but only community supported (they work well, don't worry) and drmozes' inputs were helpful in pointing out that an ARM board with an eSATA connector and an external HDD will be the best choice for a good working experience.
Out of the officially supported ARM boards, the Banana Pi looks to be easily accessible and at good price (at least in Europe / US):
https://arm.slackware.com/releases/
http://docs.slackware.com/howtos:hardware:arm:start
However, you'll be still limited with the small amount of RAM and budget-wise you'll pay for the Banana Pi 50USD, you'll need an external HDD - another 50USD and the accessories (case + power adapter) might cost you some 20-30USD more, thus reaching around 130USD. For 50USD more you'll get a decent x86 mini laptop/netbook.
 
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Old 04-17-2018, 04:11 PM   #21
Darth Vader
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There we should make a note:

The SATA port given by an Allwinner A20 board (like BananaPi or OrangePi) is a real SATA2 and not given by a USB 2.0 bridge, BUT it is limited as performances, specially as writes. See:

http://linux-sunxi.org/SATA

They claims that with some tuning it's possible to get sequential read speeds of +200 MB/s while write speeds retain at approx. 45 MB/s

Sure thing, the performances are superior to the ones given by a USB 2.0 port or the SD-card, but they are definitively inferior of a SATA2 port as we know from a (x86) PC.

BTW, also I believe that they aren't directly bootable devices, then you should still boot from the SD-card.

Last edited by Darth Vader; 04-17-2018 at 04:18 PM.
 
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Old 04-18-2018, 02:44 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post

They claims that with some tuning it's possible to get sequential read speeds of +200 MB/s while write speeds retain at approx. 45 MB/s

This is a Banana Pi with an SSD on the eSATA port:
Code:
bourbon [~] # hdparm -t /dev/sda

/dev/sda:
 Timing buffered disk reads: 176 MB in  3.02 seconds =  58.26 MB/sec
bourbon [~] #
 
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Old 04-18-2018, 03:03 AM   #23
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Just for some balance in this discussion ...
Quote:
CEO says ARM would be cheaper for Cloudflare’s workload even if x86 chips were free
If they are deploying into new datacentres, the chips must be getting very competitive. See article here for example.
 
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Old 04-18-2018, 06:09 AM   #24
Darth Vader
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syg00 View Post
Just for some balance in this discussion ...If they are deploying into new datacentres, the chips must be getting very competitive. See article here for example.
See there an example of a very competitive ARM SOC: https://www.anandtech.com/show/12025...e-applications

Sure thing, the ARM family is huge, and there is even that Qualcomm Centriq 2460, which gives you 48 cores at 2.2GHz (2.6GHz on turbo mode) for a TDP of 120W and a price of $2000.

BUT, nobody raised claims that ARM architecture is superior or inferior to x86 ISA.

We only discuss about the low power SBC solutions, able to run fan-less, and (supposedly) at a relative modest price.

Last edited by Darth Vader; 04-18-2018 at 12:10 PM.
 
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Old 04-18-2018, 06:40 AM   #25
Darth Vader
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deleted

Last edited by Darth Vader; 04-18-2018 at 12:12 PM.
 
Old 04-18-2018, 06:33 PM   #26
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There are some arm systems that are good enough for desktop like the Tegra stuff and maybe some of the newer arm stuff on it's way. Most of it still doesn't compete really with total cost to the intel type.

Atoms are finally getting useful after a rocky start but many newer ones have a very odd bios issue. The 32 bit 64 bit problem and some drivers.

I'd think the Celeron stuff is best for ease, drivers and cost.
 
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Old 04-19-2018, 03:18 AM   #27
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Once ARM -current has been rebuilt, I'm going to upgrade to Linux 4.16 (for HDMI and much other support for the 'H3' SoC) and see how the Orange Pi Plus 2E works as a desktop. I'll post in the ARM sub forum if it works out.
 
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