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Old 08-12-2007, 07:55 PM   #1
NightSky
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What Install Discs Do I Need w/o KDE


If I want 1) basic files server structure what Slackware Install Discs do I need?
2)I don't think I need KDE, want to try XFCE and GENOME.
3)As you can see in my signature, the hardware setup is old by many standards.
4) How much space should I allocate to /, Swap, Usr, Home?
Have 160gb just slack?

I have read people are just installing slack12 and using the default kernel w/o compiling.

My system will be a 2 160gb hdd dual boot, *21" 1600x1200 LCD monitor w/60hz refresh rate limit*, win98se & slackware 12 using preferred loadlin.

Suggestions please. Thanks

Last edited by NightSky; 08-12-2007 at 07:58 PM.
 
Old 08-12-2007, 08:21 PM   #2
willysr
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1. only disc 1 is required for basic setups

2. XFCE resides on /xap directory. GNOME is not officially supported, so you might want to checkout GNOME project for Slackware, such as Gnomeline, Freerock GNOME, etc

3. 160 GB ? That's quite big
swap is about 1,5-2x RAM, but if you have bigger than 1,5 GB, i think you can use less than 1x RAM

I usually use 3 partition, swap, /, and /home

the size is very dependent with the system you are working for. If you have many users, you might want to have bigger /home partition, but if the users are fixed and you probably install many application, you might want to add more space on / (/usr for more specific)
 
Old 08-12-2007, 08:25 PM   #3
hitest
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by NightSky View Post
If I want 1) basic files server structure what Slackware Install Discs do I need?
2)I don't think I need KDE, want to try XFCE and GENOME.
3)As you can see in my signature, the hardware setup is old by many standards.
4) How much space should I allocate to /, Swap, Usr, Home?
Have 160gb just slack?

I have read people are just installing slack12 and using the default kernel w/o compiling.

My system will be a 2 160gb hdd dual boot, *21" 1600x1200 LCD monitor w/60hz refresh rate limit*, win98se & slackware 12 using preferred loadlin.

Suggestions please. Thanks
For a full install of Slack 12 I only needed CDs 1-2. KDE comes on CD 2. You could do a custom install and choose your packages. I'm running XFce4 (which ships with Slack 12) and liking it a lot. Gnome no longer ships with Slackware. However, there are several versions of Gnome that you can install for Slackware. Dropline Gnome is a mature version of Gnome for Slackware.
 
Old 08-13-2007, 02:37 AM   #4
NightSky
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Thanks, I got iso from http://slackware.cs.utah.edu/pub/sla...kware-12.0-iso
I can't find 'Bootdisk' Folder on install disc1 or disc2, What am I missing?
 
Old 08-13-2007, 03:10 AM   #5
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightSky View Post
I can't find 'Bootdisk' Folder on install disc1 or disc2, What am I missing?
There isn't one. It has been replaced with the "usb-and-pxe-installers" directory.
 
Old 08-13-2007, 03:30 PM   #6
onebuck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightSky View Post
Thanks, I got iso from http://slackware.cs.utah.edu/pub/sla...kware-12.0-iso
I can't find 'Bootdisk' Folder on install disc1 or disc2, What am I missing?
Hi,
As stated there's no 'bootdisk'.

Quote:
excerpt from 'README_USB.TXT'

Introduction
------------

With the release of Slackware 12.0, the era of floppy-boot has come
to a definite end. The reason is simple - the Linux 2.6 kernel will not
fit on a single floppy, even in it's most condensed configuration.
In this README, I will show you how to use a bootable USB stick to
install Slackware. This method - creating the USB equivalent of a
boot/root floppy pair - is easy to use and fast. It requires that your
computer is able to boot from USB-HDD.

Did you read the Slackware 12.0 CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT, UPGRADE.TXT and RELEASE_NOTES?

You could also reference 'Slackware-Links' formerly 'Slackware LQ Suggestions Links!' for some good online reference.
 
Old 08-14-2007, 05:02 AM   #7
NightSky
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Thanks for the clarifications. onebuck yes i am still reading text files on install disks and other on line resources its all very complicated and may not be suitable for my dual boot needs at this time.
 
Old 08-14-2007, 12:02 PM   #8
onebuck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightSky View Post
Thanks for the clarifications. onebuck yes i am still reading text files on install disks and other on line resources its all very complicated and may not be suitable for my dual boot needs at this time.
Hi,

Yes, it can be complicated but if you prepare yourself then the task will be much simpler. Don't give up to soon!

I thought you wanted to dual boot with win98. What's the problem? Maybe we can help you out.

If you can use a usb then that would be the way to go. If you have the iso(s) then you could always put them on a local HD to install or even as a 'NFS' install if a LAN is available.

You could reference 'Slackware 12 installation with the ISOs but without burning them!' by Janux_NET which is a good example.

This link and others are referenced in 'Slackware-Links' which was compiled from 'Slackware LQ Suggestions Links!'.
 
Old 08-14-2007, 01:26 PM   #9
NightSky
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If I can continue using Loadlin w/Slackware12

Use of the Hugesmp.s Kernel is recommended and because of its size wonder if I can still use Loadlin ver16c.

Confused by the w/reference to initrid, as required in addition to kernel img - .
I have googled and tried to find current Loadlin explanations regarding slackware12.
Maybe I'm making this more complicated than it is.
Loadlin Quick Start says to just copy images to c:\loadlin.dir I will just follow those instructions even if I don't understand how ea. component works.
Thanks again

Last edited by NightSky; 08-14-2007 at 01:32 PM. Reason: Shorten and clarif y
 
Old 08-14-2007, 01:29 PM   #10
Nylex
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What's wrong with LILO?
 
Old 08-14-2007, 02:50 PM   #11
onebuck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightSky View Post
Use of the Hugesmp.s Kernel is recommended and because of its size wonder if I can still use Loadlin ver16c.

Confused by the w/reference to initrid, as required in addition to kernel img - .
I have googled and tried to find current Loadlin explanations regarding slackware12.
Maybe I'm making this more complicated than it is.
Loadlin Quick Start says to just copy images to c:\loadlin.dir I will just follow those instructions even if I don't understand how ea. component works.
Thanks again
Hi,

Is this a desire to continue to use 'loadlin' or what you feel is a necessity?. You could always use 'lilo' or 'grub'. The 2.6 kernel doesn't support umsdos so that will be one problem.

BTW, what's the confusion with initrd?
Quote:
from '/boot/README.initrd'

willi:~# cat /boot/README.initrd

Slackware initrd mini HOWTO
by Patrick Volkerding, volkerdi@slackware.com
Wed Jun 27 15:58:08 CDT 2007

This document describes how to create and install an initrd, which may be
required to use the 2.6 kernel. Also see "man mkinitrd".

1. What is an initrd?
2. Why to I need an initrd?
3. How do I build the initrd?
4. Now that I've built an initrd, how do I use it?


1. What is an initrd?

Initrd stands for "initial ramdisk". An initial ramdisk is a very small
Linux filesystem that is loaded into RAM and mounted as the kernel boots,
and before the main root filesystem is mounted.

2. Why do I need an initrd?

The usual reason to use an initrd is because you need to load kernel
modules before mounting the root partition. Usually these modules are
required to support the filesystem used by the root partition (ext3,
reiserfs, xfs), or perhaps the controller that the hard drive is attached
to (SCSI, RAID, etc). Essentially, there are so many different options
available in modern Linux kernels that it isn't practical to try to ship
many different kernels to try to cover everyone's needs. It's a lot more
flexible to ship a generic kernel and a set of kernel modules for it.

3. How do I build the initrd?

The easiest way to make the initrd is to use the mkinitrd script included
in Slackware's mkinitrd package. We'll walk through the process of
upgrading to the generic 2.6.21.5-smp Linux kernel using the packages
found in Slackware's slackware/a/ directory.

First, make sure the kernel, kernel modules, and mkinitrd package are
installed (the current version numbers might be a little different, so
this is just an example):

installpkg kernel-generic-2.6.21.5_smp-i486-1.tgz
installpkg kernel-modules-2.6.21.5_smp-i486-1.tgz
installpkg mkinitrd-1.1.2-i486-3.tgz

Change into the /boot directory:

cd /boot

Now you'll want to run "mkinitrd". I'm using reiserfs for my root
filesystem, and since it's an IDE system the reiserfs module will be
the only one I need to load:

mkinitrd -c -k 2.6.21.5-smp -m reiserfs

This should do two things. First, it will create a directory
/boot/initrd-tree containing the initrd's filesystem. Then it will
create an initrd (/boot/initrd.gz) from this tree. If you wanted to,
you could make some additional changes in /boot/initrd-tree/ and
then run mkinitrd again without options to rebuild the image. That's
optional, though, and only advanced users will need to think about that.

Here's another example: Build an initrd image using Linux 2.6.21.5-smp
kernel modules for a system with an ext3 root partition on /dev/hdb3.

mkinitrd -c -k 2.6.21.5-smp -m ext3 -f ext3 -r /dev/hdb3

The resulting initrd will automatically load the mbcache and jbd modules
used by the ext3 module.

To automatically use the current root filesystem and kernel, you can
simply use:

mkinitrd -m ext3

4. Now that I've built an initrd, how do I use it?

Now that you've got an initrd (/boot/initrd.gz), you'll want to load
it along with the kernel at boot time. If you use LILO for your boot
loader you'll need to edit /etc/lilo.conf and add a line to load the
initrd. Here's an example section of lilo.conf showing how this is
done:

# Linux bootable partition config begins
image = /boot/vmlinuz-generic-2.6.21.5-smp
initrd = /boot/initrd.gz
root = /dev/hda6
label = Lnx26215smp
read-only
# Linux bootable partition config ends

The initrd is loaded by the "initrd = /boot/initrd.gz" line.
Just add the line right below the line for the kernel image you use.
Save the file, and then run LILO again ('lilo' at the command line).
You'll need to run lilo every time you edit lilo.conf or rebuild the
initrd.

Other bootloaders such as syslinux also support the use of an initrd.
See the documentation for those programs for details on using an
initrd with them.
---------

Have fun!
'PV' has made it very simple for us to use the initrd when necessary.
 
  


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