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Old 07-14-2020, 07:19 AM   #181
anthk
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More than mate I'would ditch Plasma and I would add the full goodies set for XFCE and a good stack of GTK2-3/qt5 software not depending on Gnome or Plasma. As I could still have free space, I'll add a good bunch too of CLI tools and applications.
 
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Old 07-14-2020, 12:13 PM   #182
enorbet
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Originally Posted by anthk View Post
More than mate I'would ditch Plasma and I would add the full goodies set for XFCE and a good stack of GTK2-3/qt5 software not depending on Gnome or Plasma. As I could still have free space, I'll add a good bunch too of CLI tools and applications.
Not likely, but perhaps you could find and install Anthk Linux

All you lazy guys who want everything done for you your way probably would do best to create yet another distro branch of Ubuntu... leave the Admin work to Slackers (Oh the irony in that moniker!)
 
Old 07-14-2020, 01:16 PM   #183
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Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
... leave the Admin work to Slackers (Oh the irony in that moniker!)
Excuse me? About what Admin work you talk?

From what I seen and heard, and what says my admin friends, nobody will hire a Slackware admin, when he needs to manually maintain an entire ecosystem and anyway to work several months for setting up a multi-user NGINX server, while a CentoOS and/or RHEL admin will do all the job in several hours.

Even the admins who knows Slackware will play with it at home and at job they will likely use CentOS.

And BTW, there's NOT yet even single stable release of Slackware with PAM and Kerberos. After Slackware 15.0 will be released, we'll see what tracking it will gain in Enterprise...

Last edited by LuckyCyborg; 07-14-2020 at 01:32 PM.
 
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Old 07-14-2020, 02:49 PM   #184
bassmadrigal
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Originally Posted by LuckyCyborg View Post
Excuse me? About what Admin work you talk?
I think he means the local administrator, typically meaning you.
 
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Old 07-14-2020, 02:56 PM   #185
I.G.O.R
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyCyborg View Post
Excuse me? About what Admin work you talk?

From what I seen and heard, and what says my admin friends, nobody will hire a Slackware admin, when he needs to manually maintain an entire ecosystem and anyway to work several months for setting up a multi-user NGINX server, while a CentoOS and/or RHEL admin will do all the job in several hours.

Even the admins who knows Slackware will play with it at home and at job they will likely use CentOS.

And BTW, there's NOT yet even single stable release of Slackware with PAM and Kerberos. After Slackware 15.0 will be released, we'll see what tracking it will gain in Enterprise...
Not only admins. Software developers would choose RHEL as development environment too. Slackware is good as hobby and learning.

Last edited by I.G.O.R; 07-14-2020 at 02:59 PM.
 
Old 07-14-2020, 02:57 PM   #186
I.G.O.R
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Originally Posted by bassmadrigal View Post
I think he means the local administrator, typically meaning you.
System administrator doing full install? Hmm... it must not just local, but very very local system administrator.
 
Old 07-14-2020, 04:15 PM   #187
enorbet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I.G.O.R View Post
System administrator doing full install? Hmm... it must not just local, but very very local system administrator.
You conclude such a thing exactly because of your biased belief that Your Way is The Only Good way. I am my own administrator at home since I am retired from doing it for small business systems. I install Full Recommended Install because I see no important cost to doing so and considerable benefit. NOTHING happens on my PCs that I don't initiate, so it makes that job easier if all of the originally included libraries are present. That way there is no guesswork about whether or not any new dependencies are actually new to the system or just new to me. I KNOW if it's new to me, it's also new to the system.

I don't have any expectations that anyone else would find that best practice for them and I don't care. It works for me and that's all I need.
 
Old 07-14-2020, 04:31 PM   #188
bassmadrigal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I.G.O.R View Post
Not only admins. Software developers would choose RHEL as development environment too. Slackware is good as hobby and learning.
Slackware is also good for developing. It has a lot of development software already included and many others are easily available on SBo. Also Slackware doesn't separate packages into -dev, so any program installed is complete.

However, if you're developing in a corporate environment, they may have OS requirements that makes Slackware less ideal than something like RHEL or Debian.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I.G.O.R View Post
System administrator doing full install? Hmm... it must not just local, but very very local system administrator.
In Slackware, the system administrator is typically the person using the computer. This isn't always the case as there are instances of Slackware being used in multi-user/multi-computer environments, but due to the lack of PAM for so many years, corporate use of Slackware is rare.
 
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Old 07-14-2020, 04:31 PM   #189
I.G.O.R
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
You conclude such a thing exactly because of your biased belief that Your Way is The Only Good way. I am my own administrator at home since I am retired from doing it for small business systems. I install Full Recommended Install because I see no important cost to doing so and considerable benefit. NOTHING happens on my PCs that I don't initiate, so it makes that job easier if all of the originally included libraries are present. That way there is no guesswork about whether or not any new dependencies are actually new to the system or just new to me. I KNOW if it's new to me, it's also new to the system.

I don't have any expectations that anyone else would find that best practice for them and I don't care. It works for me and that's all I need.
I've discovered a lot of new things about majority of slackware users. They despise graph dependency resolution in packaging systems of other distros, but that's because they do full install in slackware what makes them appreciate no-dependencies in slackware packaging system. Just amazing...
 
Old 07-14-2020, 04:38 PM   #190
enorbet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I.G.O.R View Post
I've discovered a lot of new things about majority of slackware users. They despise graph dependency resolution in packaging systems of other distros, but that's because they do full install in slackware what makes them appreciate no-dependencies in slackware packaging system. Just amazing...
Yup! Even if the count were to be 10,000 unused files the cost to store them is beyond trivial but since I consider my time quite valuable, not wasting it on trivial dependencies as well as just having the ones our BDFL spent many months (if not years) checking and testing for smooth integration makes it pretty much a no-brainer. Low Cost? High Return? I'm down!
 
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Old 07-14-2020, 06:57 PM   #191
bassmadrigal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I.G.O.R View Post
I've discovered a lot of new things about majority of slackware users. They despise graph dependency resolution in packaging systems of other distros, but that's because they do full install in slackware what makes them appreciate no-dependencies in slackware packaging system. Just amazing...
One beauty with Slackware is you don't have to worry about dependencies of the base install if you do a full install. It doesn't really take up that much space and makes it much easier when supporting 3rd-party repos.

You're welcome to run a partial installation, but since most 3rd-party repos expect a full install (and don't document dependencies in official packages), it may lead to things not working.

Here's a great summary from forum member ruario. It's a few years old, but still applies:

https://docs.slackware.com/slackware..._off_slackware
 
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Old 07-15-2020, 06:28 AM   #192
chrisretusn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I.G.O.R View Post
I've discovered a lot of new things about majority of slackware users. They despise graph dependency resolution in packaging systems of other distros, but that's because they do full install in slackware what makes them appreciate no-dependencies in slackware packaging system. Just amazing...
Yes indeed. Slackware is NOT Debian, *buntu, etc.

Slackware is by design to be installed as a complete package. All of the dependencies of the many packages that make up the Slackware Linux distribution are already resolved. Dependency resolution is not needed with Slackware. Patrick Volkerding has taken care of that for us. This is the "in a nut shell" reason that a Full Installation is recommended for Slackware.

Look at Slackware as a single unit comprised of packages. The package management tools, specifically "slackpkg" will only work with this unit of packages that are Slackware. It's job is to keep this unit up to date. You cannot install or upgraded packages with "slackpkg" that are not part of this Slackware unit. The 'slackpkg clean-system' command will remove all packages that are not part the Slackware unit.

If you want to install programs that are not part of Slackware, then you are on your own to resolve those dependencies that are not part of the Slackware unit and only for those dependencies that are not part of Slackware. By "on your own", I also mean using the resources available such as SBo or pre-built packages provided by other Slackware users. This by the way I consider a feature.

Last edited by chrisretusn; 07-15-2020 at 06:29 AM.
 
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Old 07-15-2020, 08:02 AM   #193
solarfields
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Originally Posted by bassmadrigal View Post
Slackware is also good for developing.
...and science...

...and almost anything you like.
 
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Old 07-15-2020, 09:02 AM   #194
I.G.O.R
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Originally Posted by bassmadrigal View Post
Slackware is also good for developing. It has a lot of development software already included and many others are easily available on SBo. Also Slackware doesn't separate packages into -dev, so any program installed is complete.

However, if you're developing in a corporate environment, they may have OS requirements that makes Slackware less ideal than something like RHEL or Debian.
Quote:
Originally Posted by solarfields View Post
...and science...

...and almost anything you like.
Yes, in theory, assuming you are alone developer/scientist locked up in basement.

If you need to colaborate with people, then safe choise is not to use Slackware in order to avoid unneeded surprises/obstacles leading to time loss.
 
Old 07-15-2020, 09:42 AM   #195
solarfields
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Originally Posted by I.G.O.R View Post
Yes, in theory, assuming you are alone developer/scientist locked up in basement.

If you need to colaborate with people, then safe choise is not to use Slackware in order to avoid unneeded surprises/obstacles leading to time loss.
Could you elaborate a bit more on that? You know that how? Are you a developer, where in your work you were forced to not use Slackware? Any scientific papers you have published, for which you were forced not to use Slackware? Could you tell something more to the point than arguing for the sake of argument?
 
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