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Old 08-28-2018, 05:20 PM   #46
Gerard Lally
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Slackware - both people and software - is one of very few projects I have always trusted unreservedly.
 
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Old 09-09-2018, 12:19 PM   #47
birdboy
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Slackware -current is more stable than all other 'LTS' 'distributions' combined, and then some.

As for Slackware -stable, let's just say if aliens ever do come and visit, Slackware -stable will offer them a friendly tty with fine selection of craft beer on the side.
 
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Old 09-10-2018, 03:37 AM   #48
chrisretusn
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A Full Installation gives you everything you need to build on.

/etc/rc.d/

On non-slack programs (third party):

With a few exceptions I am the package manager. Those exceptions right now are Alien Bob and zerouno.

SlackBuild scripts, best thing since sliced bread or the wheel. I can build it my way.

I determine the dependencies and compile options.
 
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Old 09-10-2018, 08:45 AM   #49
SCerovec
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As soon as i find a better one suited for my needs, I'll quit using it (Slackware) and never turn back.

"... and I'm growing old..." (song)
 
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Old 09-12-2018, 08:59 PM   #50
SimonDevine
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Registered: Oct 2016
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Distribution: Slack 14.2 64 using KDE 4.14 on Acer Aspire M3900 i3 4GB RAM with Dell E1913 monitor 1280x1024@75Hz
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The greatest thing for me was that it helped me learn Linux.

Aside from a 2002 3-month foray into Slackware 8, Windows had been in my life since '92, Once I made the decision to switch in October 2016, it became a Ginormous Project that took until March 2018 to perfect it to just how I like it.

Have currently got Slackware 14.2 KDE, Slackware 14.2 Trinity, Mint 17 KDE, Kubuntu 14 KDE, Kubuntu 18 Plasma 5 but my default boot is, and always will be, SLACKWARE.

I have created a few problems for myself along the road, but have always got recovery done using tools within Slackware.

It is the best for learning how to use Linux right from Newbie to Advanced User as it tests us intellectually all the way.

Yes, it can be tough, but it makes us work for our beautiful systems.

I can't imagine ever going back to Windows. Slackware Rules My Roost!!
 
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Old 09-13-2018, 02:27 AM   #51
SCerovec
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Did i say that i like how recovery is not harder than install only on Slackware?

Once You ride that horse, You will always stay on top of it
 
Old 09-13-2018, 06:06 PM   #52
hitest
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonDevine View Post
I can't imagine ever going back to Windows. Slackware Rules My Roost!!
I hear that! I do have one Windows 10 Pro laptop for my wife to do work on her proprietary windows only work environment.
I run 6 Slackware64-current units. One of the units has an OpenBSD 6.3 partition on it.
My favourite media consumption device is my Lenovo T420, 2.5 GHz, 8 GB RAM, 110 GB SSD, running on Slackware64-current with XFCE....the unit is nice and fast.
Proud Slacker since 04 (version 10.0).
 
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Old 09-14-2018, 06:09 AM   #53
ahc_fan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
Simplicity and transparency. With Slackware, user is in control.

Afterthought:

If you are new to Slackware and Linux, neither is simple, because new user has arrived in a different world.

Slackware teaches you to understand Linux. Distros that set out to make Linux "easy" do not; they keep Linux, to borrow a phrase from Earl Derr Biggers, "behind that curtain."
This sums up my feelings. I am by no means an expert and probably never will be, but even I can appreciate the simplicity of this distro. Back when I was sampling distros to see if Linux was right for me I noticed that a lot of Linux newbie guides didn't really apply to most of them for some reason and it really confused me. Eventually got Slackware and read the slackbook and everything just meshed with me. Got a couple linux CLI books and they were actually "compatible" with Slackware. I feel that this is what Linux is supposed to be.
 
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Old 09-14-2018, 03:24 PM   #54
SCerovec
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There are distros with a ton of HOWTOs and recipes that just teach you a lot while simply do not apply to the system you read them on.

You can't patch the system to something it couldn't out of the box.

You can't push it any further than where it sits at.

Let alone, do something that wasn't conceived by the maintainers and packagers.

Slackware is not such a distro - nor it ever was.
 
Old 09-14-2018, 05:35 PM   #55
ReaperX7
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1. Slackware teaches you how to use UNIX, not just Slackware itself, or simply GNU/Linux. It actually gets down into basic level UNIX handling methods that easily transfer from Slackware to any other Linux solution out there as well as other UNIX-like systems such as FreeBSD/TrueOS, OpenIndiana, etc. The "Slackware way" of doing things, is downright the easiest, and the most universal.

2. No fluff or missing pieces. You actually get all you need out-of-the-box to get a fully working system. No excess compile times needed for about 99% of systems out there, no extra downloading, etc. It... just... works.

3. It's simplified for ease of administration. Yes I will bash on systemd here, but rightfully so. Scripting is the most basic and simple way of creating services in UNIX-like systems and shell scripts work wonderfully for this purpose. They are easy to understand and work with the shell of the system, not against it or with another part of the system that isn't the shell. This gives YOU complete control. Not only this, but learning scripting carries over across the UNIX spectrum to other systems. This goes right back to the "if you learn Slackware, you learn Linux" argument. I'd dare to say "if you learn Slackware, you learn the basic fundamentals of UNIX" respectively as well. systemd is but one software package for Linux only. Scripts are universal, even to Windows.

4. You get administrative rights out-of-the-box. No learning sudo or other indirect access methods to get yourself into root. Slackware lets you decide for yourself if you need or want access. If you want to setup a user, then that's on you, otherwise you start with root. Other systems try to discourage you from root. It's good to limit root access, but if it's your system, you shouldn't let someone else dictate what you can do with your system. After all, fudging your system to hell and actually learning how to fix it with your system tools and booting into bash, is part of the vital learning experience.
 
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Old 09-15-2018, 04:52 AM   #56
chrisretusn
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Thanks ReaperX7, Adding

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisretusn View Post
A Full Installation gives you everything you need to build on.

/etc/rc.d/

You get administrative rights out-of-the-box. and "su", sudo has its is uses but not as a substitute for root.

On non-slack programs (third party):

With a few exceptions I am the package manager. Those exceptions right now are Alien Bob and zerouno.

SlackBuild scripts, best thing since sliced bread or the wheel. I can build it my way.

I determine the dependencies and compile options.
 
Old 09-15-2018, 06:05 AM   #57
solarfields
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Reliability. Also, i like the (relatively) simple way to create packages, by writing my own SlackBuild scripts
 
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Old Yesterday, 06:58 AM   #58
birdboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solarfields View Post
Reliability.
I think this is single biggest differentiator. I've had stability issues with OpenBSD, FreeBSD, NetBSD, DragonFly BSD, 99.9% of other Linux distributions, but never with Slackware. Never.
 
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Old Today, 06:24 AM   #59
ChrisAbela
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1. All Slackware tools are written BASH (I am not proficient in programming)
2. It's stable (as I avoid current)
3. It's not perfect (but I love the challenge to fix it to my taste, despite my limitations)
 
Old Today, 08:43 AM   #60
dugan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by montagdude View Post
For me, it is stability, extensibility, and simplicity, in that order.
Pretty much what I was about to say: it gives you a very stable and well-tested stock install, and makes it as easy as possible to customize (e.g. by building your own packages).
 
  


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