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Old 01-25-2010, 08:04 PM   #16
GazL
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The main reason I like to have separate filesystems for /var, /tmp and /home is to separate the filesystems that are subject to write activity from the ones that are almost entirely static/readonly. if your system does crash, then, in theory, the rootfs and /usr should still be pretty much intact as there shouldn't have been any recent write activity to it. There are some other reasons, but that's the main reason I do it.
 
Old 01-25-2010, 08:10 PM   #17
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Code:
/dev/sda5 on / type reiserfs (rw,noatime)
tmpfs on /tmp type tmpfs (rw,noatime)
tmpfs on /var/tmp type tmpfs (rw,noatime)
/dev/sda4 on /home type xfs (rw,noatime)
/dev/sda6 on /boot type ext2 (rw,noatime)
 
Old 01-25-2010, 08:16 PM   #18
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by agi93 View Post
Interesting. What do you like about JFS and why do you choose it over something like ext4? I used it for a little bit at one point and it was fine. On Arch Linux my system froze and I had to shut it down with the power switch, rendering my system unbootable until I took the cd and did a fsck. That's an annoying little niggle I'd like to avoid, so I was a bit reluctant to use JFS again.

Do you just separate out /home to keep your personal data secure? Honestly I do very little on my laptop except some homework, and Slackware has been extremely stable in the past, so I don't know if that's really necessary for me. Of course, I could be dead wrong (am I?).

Thanks for telling me about LVM! I never really knew what it was for and never thought it was relevant since I only have one hard disk.
If the handler has the means to repair the filesystem then you should not have to run filesystem maintenance. But there's always the chance that maintenance will be required with any filesystem. Hopefully journals can recover but when they can't then you had better be prepared to perform maintenance on the filesystem.

BTW, that's one of the reasons to have a good 'UPS' for a critical system or the means to shell into the machine to cleanly shutdown.

As for reliable and recoverable I'll stick with ext2/3 for my OS. Others have advantages for video and data streams but that's not critical to me if you loose 'YouTube' or MP on a relay.

 
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Old 01-25-2010, 08:19 PM   #19
agi93
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That sounds pretty good, GazL. Ok, here's another revised version of the partitioning scheme I might use:

Code:
/       ext4    20G
/tmp    ext4    3G
/var    ext4    8G
/home   ext4    remaining space
swap    swap    2250M

sHy, your scheme is really interesting. How did you get /tmp to be tmpfs, does xfs provide any real advantages over ext4, and what about separating your /boot partition? I read in the ArchWiki that /boot must be in the first 8G or so of one's hard drive to allow the system to boot, but apparently that's not the case in Slackware. Does making it a separate nonjournaled partition protect it or something?

I'm also surprised to see you using reiserfs as your / partition and xfs as your /home simply because I've read so much about those filesystems getting b0rked unrecoverably. Perhaps the versions shipped with Slackware are more stable?


Yeesh, I didn't know partitioning could get this personal

Last edited by agi93; 01-26-2010 at 06:04 PM.
 
Old 01-25-2010, 09:44 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GazL

JFS is a nice filesystem, but as you've already pointed out, its development has pretty much ceased (OpenSUSE even dropped support for it in 11.2) so sadly it looks as if its days are numbered.
Until Pat makes it official and drops JFS, I think JFS will be around for a while. Anyways, why should JFS be the only FS dropped if we are going to drop a FS? What about ReiserFS v3? V4 granted is already dead, but how much longer is v3 going to be maintained?

I also use JFS, and I just have two partitions. / and /home (and swap only on my old desktop). Works just fine.


Also I noticed the OP having a swap > than 2GB, isn't that not supposed to be possible? cfdisk won't let you make a partition > than 2GB, and if you make a swap partition bigger than 2GB with a different partitioning tool, cfdisk won't recognize it properly anyways. Or did I miss something, and you can under a 64-bit system?

Last edited by Jeebizz; 01-25-2010 at 09:47 PM.
 
Old 01-26-2010, 02:22 AM   #21
Didier Spaier
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I have only one partition for / (with reiserfs btw, never had a problem with it) and another for swap.

All VirtualBox data reside in /home/user/.VirtualBox. You can set up a maximum size for each virtual hard disk, but it can adjust its actual size to what is really needed, which is nice.

For instance here:
Code:
bash-3.1$ ls -lh /home/didier/.VirtualBox/HardDisks
total 18G
-rw------- 1 didier users 2,5G 2010-01-26 00:23 Arch.vdi
-rw------- 1 didier users 4,2G 2010-01-07 15:33 Debian.vdi
-rw------- 1 didier users 4,8G 2010-01-07 15:34 Fedora.vdi
-rw------- 1 didier users 2,7G 2010-01-07 15:32 Mandriva.vdi
-rw------- 1 didier users 4,0G 2010-01-07 15:32 Xubuntu.vdi
bash-3.1$
IMHO you do not need a distinct /home partition.

PS @Jeebiz: my swap partition is 4 GB wide.

Last edited by Didier Spaier; 01-26-2010 at 06:08 AM. Reason: Grammar
 
Old 01-26-2010, 05:49 AM   #22
GazL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeebizz View Post
Until Pat makes it official and drops JFS, I think JFS will be around for a while. Anyways, why should JFS be the only FS dropped if we are going to drop a FS? What about ReiserFS v3? V4 granted is already dead, but how much longer is v3 going to be maintained?

I also use JFS, and I just have two partitions. / and /home (and swap only on my old desktop). Works just fine.
Yes, don't get me wrong. I've been served very well by jfs over the years and I'm not suggesting it's removal at all. Infact, I'm saddened to see its future in doubt.

The problem I see for it is that as it's upstream development has effectively been abandoned it's not going to get any further improvements of any significance, and will eventually fall into a state of semi-disrepair. Right now, I still see it as a very viable filesystem, I just fear for its future.

Who knows, maybe btrfs will be so good that it becomes the one true filesystem and solves all our problems. Time will tell I guess.
 
Old 01-26-2010, 09:13 AM   #23
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True, I also feel saddened by the future of JFS. I don't know how btrfs will compare, but I really wish development wouldn't cease. Or at least I wish someone would pick it up and continue. I would if I could, but programming is something that I will never truly grasp. If I were a very good coder, I would throw my efforts in. *sigh*
 
Old 01-26-2010, 06:11 PM   #24
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After doing some more reading and googling, I think I'm going to keep it relatively simple:

Code:
/	ext4	20G
swap	swap	2250M
/home	ext4	remaining
Slackware has never crashed for me before, ext4 is a pretty stable filesystem especially since they're hardening it up (at the cost of speed, though), and I get to save my /home in the event of a system crash by putting it on a separate partition (just in case!).

Thanks for your advice everyone!
 
Old 01-27-2010, 01:24 AM   #25
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Don't forget to make frequent backups of /home though just in case of a HDD failure or other hazard

Last edited by Didier Spaier; 01-27-2010 at 01:26 AM.
 
Old 01-27-2010, 07:25 AM   #26
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Will do. I plan to use rsnapshot. I wonder if I can configure it to back up online rather than having my bulky hard drive plugged in all the time.
 
Old 02-21-2010, 04:43 PM   #27
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Hi, everyone! I recently noticed that on Mac OS X computers, there is a directory called /private, in which /var, /etc, and /tmp are symlinks to /private/[var,etc,tmp] respectively. The purpose of this directory is probably to separate host-specific data, but it got me thinking about doing something like this on Linux for directories that see a lot of write activity like /var and /tmp.

Since /tmp poses such a problem about how big it really should be (too small and compilations/installations fail, too big and space is wasted), I was thinking of creating a separate partition and mounting that at
/lbl (from "labile" meaning liable to change), with subdirectories var/ and tmp/. The actual /var and /tmp would then be deleted and recreated as symlinks to their respective counterparts in /lbl. If I think of any other directories that change pretty frequently or that I want to separate from '/' or /home, I can just symlink it to /lbl.

This would allow me to simply create a fairly large /lbl partition for both /var and /tmp and then not even worry about size constraints. I normally mount /tmp on tmpfs, but sometimes I do mass builds that require more space than 999MB.

Is this madness? Would it even do what I want? Also, would this kind of change survive Slackware system upgrades, or would this screw everything up?

Last edited by agi93; 02-21-2010 at 05:02 PM.
 
Old 02-22-2010, 01:57 PM   #28
slacky02
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i don't think it's necessary to dig any deeper into the whole partition thing as you've already done, since you're not administering a perimeter server. but if I were to do such an elaborate partitioning I'd give /usr a separate partition to keep the root system apart from user stuff. All dir's containing crucial software to bring up the system at least to single user mode should be kept apart from the rest, imho.

cheers
 
Old 02-22-2010, 02:18 PM   #29
hughetorrance
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If you have Vista and a recovery partition then you have only two primaries left so you will have to make one of them extended and use logicals for all the others... as for speed,the fastest AFAIK is ext2 and thats what I use,so far I have never had any problems... I use gparted as found on most distros or the parted magic CD,the CD also has test disk which will restore your partition table if you manage to screw it up LOL
 
Old 04-01-2010, 05:14 AM   #30
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Code:
$ df
Filesystem    Type    Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1      jfs    298M  185M  114M  62% /
/dev/sda2      jfs    5,0G  3,4G  1,7G  68% /usr
/dev/sda3      jfs     99M   23M   76M  24% /var
/dev/sda4      jfs     70G  555M   69G   1% /home
tmpfs        tmpfs    2,0G  165M  1,8G   9% /tmp
tmpfs        tmpfs    2,0G     0  2,0G   0% /dev/shm
Code:
$ mount
/dev/sda1 on / type jfs (rw,noatime)
proc on /proc type proc (rw)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw)
usbfs on /proc/bus/usb type usbfs (rw)
/dev/sda2 on /usr type jfs (rw,nodev,noatime)
/dev/sda3 on /var type jfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime)
/dev/sda4 on /home type jfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime)
tmpfs on /tmp type tmpfs (rw)
tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw)
Slackware64-current and SlackBuilds.org mirrors are also kept in /usr/share/mirrors.
 
  


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