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Old 03-14-2019, 03:56 AM   #1
ziggyzagged
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Question Verifying if cups is enabled


I'm trying to verify if CUPS is disabled in my Slackware by trying the commands below and get the following output:
Code:
chkconfig --list cups
Output:
Code:
-bash: chkconfig: command not found
Code:
systemctl is-enabled cups
Output:
Code:
-bash: systemctl: command not found
Any suggestions as to how I can check CUPS?

Appreciate it!
 
Old 03-14-2019, 04:15 AM   #2
bathory
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Hi,

There is no such things like chkconfig and systemd in Slackware

If you want to see if cups is enabled, run:
Code:
ls -l /etc/rc.d/rc.cups
and check if the execute bit is on.
If it is, then cups will start automatically on every boot


Regards
 
Old 03-14-2019, 05:30 AM   #3
ziggyzagged
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bathory View Post
Hi,

There is no such things like chkconfig and systemd in Slackware

If you want to see if cups is enabled, run:
Code:
ls -l /etc/rc.d/rc.cups
and check if the execute bit is on.
If it is, then cups will start automatically on every boot


Regards
Sorry, noob here!

Which one is the execute bit? Here's what I'm getting:
Code:
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 3678 Jun 15  2016 /etc/rc.d/rc.cups
 
Old 03-14-2019, 05:40 AM   #4
bathory
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Quote:
Which one is the execute bit? Here's what I'm getting:

-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 3678 Jun 15 2016 /etc/rc.d/rc.cups[/CODE]
There is no execute bit (x) in the above output, so the file is not executable and for this reason cups is not starting on boot.
To change that you should run:
Code:
chmod +x /etc/rc.d/rc.cups
Since as you say, you're a noob, better take a look here about file permissions and how to manage them


Regards

Last edited by bathory; 03-14-2019 at 06:23 AM.
 
Old 03-14-2019, 07:36 AM   #5
hazel
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Slackware is one of the few distros that do not use systemd to start up. Consequently it does not have systemctl, which is part of systemd. It is also angled at people who are at home with the command line and understand the basics of how a Linux system is put together. That doesn't mean that a novice can't use it, but you must expect a steep learning curve. You might feel more at ease with a different distro.
 
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Old 03-14-2019, 07:57 AM   #6
average_user
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
Consequently it does not have systemctl, which is part of systemd
But it has a confusingly named sysctl that is a part of procps-ng.
 
Old 03-14-2019, 08:48 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by average_user View Post
But it has a confusingly named sysctl that is a part of procps-ng.
Sysctl is very old. It already existed when I started using Linux around the turn of the century. If there is any confusion now, it is entirely the fault of Poettering and the systemd team.

What sysctl does is to allow system administrators to actually write into, and so modify, the running kernel, using the /proc interface (which procps deals with). systemctl is the user/administrator interface of systemd.
 
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Old 03-14-2019, 09:34 AM   #8
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
Slackware is one of the few distros that do not use systemd to start up.
Praise Bob! One of many reasons why I love Slackware. As suggested previously I think it is a good idea to read the ample, available documentation on how to configure Slackware.

The Slackware Documentation Project

Slackware Links

Slackware Book
 
Old 03-14-2019, 11:52 AM   #9
kjhambrick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by average_user View Post
But it has a confusingly named sysctl that is a part of procps-ng.
average_user --

IMO, the distros that run systemd have a confusingly named program called systemctl which is too similar to an existing, very important Admin Tool on Linux / BSD.

The sysctl command has been around a very long time ...

$0.02 ...

EDIT: to see if cups is enabled:
Code:
# ls -la /etc/rc.d/rc.cups         # permissions should be -rwx-r-xr-x ( 755 )
See the Slackware Documentation Project Site: https://docs.slackware.com

Based on your recent Qs here on LQ, you probably want to familiarize yourself with the basics of the best Linux Distro out there ( but I am a little biased )

HTH

-- kjh

Last edited by kjhambrick; 03-14-2019 at 12:00 PM. Reason: P.S.
 
Old 03-14-2019, 12:52 PM   #10
Ramurd
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*cough*
OP did not state systemctl but chkconfig; which is the RHEL6 way; I think he's more familiar with RHEL family, which is fine.

In very short:
When Slackware boots, it starts a procss called 'init'
Init reads a file: /etc/inittab

In that file is listed which processes should be run at which runlevels. (type runlevel at your prompt and notice it is (probably) 4 when you're reading this )
One of the scripts launched by init is /etc/rc.d/rc.S as initialisation

That script runs a few other scripts in /etc/rc.d (as long as they have their x-bit (executable) set)

Also there's a file rc.local: which you're free to fill with services you want to be started; Similary there's a script rc.local_shutdown for services you want to be shutdown clean on system shutdown.

Then in particular cups: it is launched by rc.cups, which is called by rc.M
rc.M has this comment at the top:
Code:
# rc.M          This file is executed by init(8) when the system is being
#               initialized for one of the "multi user" run levels (i.e.
#               levels 1 through 6).  It usually does mounting of file
#               systems et al.
(triggered: runlevel 6 is reboot, right?)

Anyway, if you look close, you'll see that rc.cups is ran when /etc/rc.d/rc.cups has x-bit set;
I would recommend reading the Slackware book; not only to learn Slackware, but to learn Linux; You'll also learn what other systems do, how they do that and maybe find a rationale. (Although I have yet to discover the rationale behind systemd) Read: http://www.slackbook.org/

That's the short and technical of it.
 
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Old 03-14-2019, 04:04 PM   #11
average_user
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjhambrick View Post
average_user --

IMO, the distros that run systemd have a confusingly named program called systemctl which is too similar to an existing, very important Admin Tool on Linux / BSD.

The sysctl command has been around a very long time ...
Come on, I didn't say it's Slackware's fault. I just wanted to let OP know that there is also sysctl that is not, say, a variant or an abbreviation of systemctl.
 
Old 03-14-2019, 11:40 PM   #12
ziggyzagged
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These are all very helpful! Thanks everyone!
 
  


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