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Old 12-28-2010, 01:18 AM   #1
Idrankthecoolaid
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Registered: Dec 2010
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system shell font size


Before I ask my question I just want to say that this forum has already given me so much. I was using UBUNTU and still do, but I dual boot UBUNTU/Slackware now and my Linux knowledge has increased so much. This forum has been right there with me for the last couple weeks and I was reticent to post a question until a knew I had exhausted the available sources. So here goes.....

Can I change the font size of the system shell that begins at startup (with the boot info and stuff). I really like using this shell as user. The thing that would make me nuts for it is if I can make the text a bit smaller. I have a 1920x1200 display and could really take advantage of all of that "real estate." The other posts related to this seem to focus an a broken configuration from the beginning, but my install is SWEET. Can I change this or is it baked into the system?

Someone out there knows how about this.....

ps.. Thanx in advance for giving this question a look, and any info would be greatly appreciated.
 
Old 12-28-2010, 01:41 AM   #2
ponce
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http://vcn.bc.ca/~dugan/setting-up-slackware.html

I suggest you to have a look at this page Dugan wrote: there's a section, "Setting the Console Video Mode", that can be what you're looking for.
 
Old 12-28-2010, 07:47 AM   #3
jamesf
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Ponce and Dugan are certainly correct, but there's more than one way to skin a cat. ;v)

During the brief period that lilo waits for you to change the default boot choice you can highlight a choice and hit the tab key to get a boot prompt. Add " vga=ask" to the end of the line lilo presents and your hardware will be probed for video modes to boot. There's a further "scan" option presented to you that I've never used.

For actually selecting the font used once the video mode is selected open a shell, "su -" to root, and run pkgtool. Scroll down the list of system configuration options almost to the bottom and pick Setup. Scroll down almost to the bottom again and pick setconsolefont.

Please note that I think there might be some oddities that occur if you change the console font. Or, there used to be, I can't remember. I tried it back a few slackware's ago and haven't since. Perhaps someone more knowledgeable will chime in for me. :vD
 
Old 12-28-2010, 10:26 AM   #4
onebuck
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Hi,

Why not just run the script from cli as root?
Quote:
excerpt /usr/bin/setconsolefont;

> $REPLY
if [ ! $? = 0 ]; then
load_font
exit
fi
FONT=`cat $REPLY`
rm -f $REPLY
load_font $FONT
dialog --title "SET AS DEFAULT FONT" --yesno "Well, what do you think? \
If you'd like to make this your default font, select YES. You can change \
the default font any time by typing 'setconsolefont' or by editing \
/etc/rc.d/rc.font. If you don't \
like this font, select NO, and you'll be returned to the font selection \
menu. If you decide you want to stick with the default font, hit ESC or \
CANCEL once you get to that menu." 11 60
if [ $? = 0 ]; then
cat << EOF > $T_PX/etc/rc.d/rc.font
#!/bin/sh
#
# This selects your default screen font from among the ones in
# /usr/share/kbd/consolefonts.
#
setfont -v $FONT
EOF

[end excerpt]
I don't see a problem with re-running pkgtool but running '/usr/bin/setconsolefont' from cli would do the script actions.
 
Old 12-28-2010, 07:30 PM   #5
Idrankthecoolaid
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Thank you to all who replied to this. I checked out the tutorials that are.... somewhere on this site..... and found that I knew nothing about setting up Slackware to load the generic kernel. I then decided to back up my files externally and install the 64-bit version(13.1). At the end of the install I decided to experiment with the font question that most people ignore. I chose a ten point font and it works great!

So I'm sorry for wasting everybody's time by just formatting and installing an os, but once again, I really learned a lot from this forum. I am thinking of contributing to the threads involving the dreaded Broadcom BCM43xx wifi devices. I don't choose to do netconfig during install, and then make and install the STA driver as well as wicd. I really struggled with this at first, but I can install the os and configure my network in no time these days. ALL BECAUSE OF THIS FORUM My Slackware hobby is taking over my computer use. This is awsome!

Anyway, thanks again to everyone who replied and happy holidays.
 
Old 12-28-2010, 10:29 PM   #6
jamesf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Hi,

Why not just run the script from cli as root?
I don't see a problem with re-running pkgtool but running '/usr/bin/setconsolefont' from cli would do the script actions.
Well, for one I don't know what sort of environment that pkgtool creates for itself and the scripts it runs (like setconsolefont).

Second, the second email that you get from a new install suggests using pkgtool to maintain the system later.

Quote:
Message 2:
From root Fri May 14 00:44:22 2010
Return-Path: root
From: root
Date: Fri, 14 May 2010 00:43:15 -0500
To: root
Subject: Welcome to Linux (Slackware 13.1)!
User-Agent: Heirloom mailx 12.4 7/29/08
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Status: RO


Welcome! I'm glad to see you've made it this far! :^)

Here are a few hints to help you navigate through the Linux operating
system a little bit better.

Tools to help configure your system:

pkgtool: Remember those screens you saw while each package was
installing? You can see all that information (and more) again. The
simplest way is to use the 'pkgtool' utility to view the package
contents. Another way is to use 'less' or a text editor to read the
files in /var/log/packages and /var/log/scripts (this is the method I
use). The pkgtool script serves as a frontend to the command line
package tools, so it's a menu based program that will enable you to
remove, install, or view packages that are currently installed on the
system. pkgtool will also allow you to re-run some of the system admin
scripts that you may have seen during the installation process.
cheers!
 
Old 12-28-2010, 11:45 PM   #7
Idrankthecoolaid
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well done

I'm going to experiment now. Thank you to all who joined in, this was a curiosity that turned into finding some great sources. My learning trail just forked into many directions. Now if I can only figure out how to mark this as [SOLVED]....
 
Old 12-29-2010, 07:46 AM   #8
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesf View Post
Well, for one I don't know what sort of environment that pkgtool creates for itself and the scripts it runs (like setconsolefont).

Second, the second email that you get from a new install suggests using pkgtool to maintain the system later.

cheers!
In no way was I suggesting that you were wrong in using pkgtool. But you should know that the scripts are available that are run from 'pkgtool', nothing else intended.

Also nothing wrong with following the canned suggestions you get from PV & team after install.


EDIT: 'pkgtool' is curses based, allowing a user to select options (scripts) that the user wishes to re-run.

Last edited by onebuck; 12-29-2010 at 07:49 AM. Reason: pkgtool answer
 
Old 12-29-2010, 08:08 AM   #9
jamesf
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Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Hi,
In no way was I suggesting that you were wrong in using pkgtool. But you should know that the scripts are available that are run from 'pkgtool', nothing else intended.
Oh, I know. I'm just one of those very literal people. So, you asked, "Why don't you run this?" And I simply replied with the two reasons I don't.

No problem. ;v)

And, I learned something. I'd simply never gone searching for the pkgtool individual option scripts before. Now I know that they exist. Thanks.

Edit: I guess the second email tells you that those scripts are there. Heh. My mistake. :vD

Last edited by jamesf; 12-29-2010 at 08:17 AM.
 
Old 12-29-2010, 08:27 AM   #10
onebuck
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Hi,

No harm!

Several Slackware users that I know are 'literal', as am I.
Nothing wrong with that trait as long as others understand where you stance or views come from.
 
  


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