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Old 10-05-2017, 01:38 PM   #136
Darth Vader
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Yeah, but no WebRTC support on Pale Moon? Jeez!

Seriously? In the A.D. 2017?

That lack is a show stopper for me to treat it seriously.

For example, we use for communication at job a (internal) portal which use WebRTC for (video-)chat, notifications and so on.

Of course that I cannot use this Pale Moon to connect to that portal. I tested that several minutes ago.

Last edited by Darth Vader; 10-05-2017 at 01:40 PM.
 
Old 10-05-2017, 01:56 PM   #137
ondoho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
Yeah, but no WebRTC support on Pale Moon? Jeez!

Seriously? In the A.D. 2017?

That lack is a show stopper for me to treat it seriously.

For example, we use for communication at job a (internal) portal which use WebRTC for (video-)chat, notifications and so on.

Of course that I cannot use this Pale Moon to connect to that portal. I tested that several minutes ago.

another one who wants the leanest, meanest, lightweight software with the same ui as 10 years ago, yet demands it to be fully featured and 100% up there with all that bloatware they are opposing...

it's time for that song again...

Last edited by ondoho; 10-05-2017 at 02:12 PM. Reason: clarify what i'm refering to
 
Old 10-05-2017, 02:00 PM   #138
Jeebizz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
^ another one who wants the leanest, meanest, lightweight software with the same ui as 10 years ago, yet demands it to be fully featured and 100% up there with all that bloatware they are opposing...

it's time for that song again...
I actually don't have a lot on Palemoon, a standard adblocker is the only extension - and Palemoon complains about it - with or without the adblocker though I still have issues with youtube , other than that Palemoon works for me.
 
Old 10-06-2017, 06:55 AM   #139
badbetty
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Well ive just tried palemoon for the first time today having seen this thread (and paid some attention to it :-) )


Palemoon appears much more performant in terms of speed in loading and browsing on all my machines, compared to firefox and icecat. Midori is same/close, but I have problems using Midori (for a different forum I suspect).

How secure (whatever that means) is Palemoon I wonder rhetorically speaking.
 
Old 10-06-2017, 11:23 AM   #140
Jeebizz
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Unlike Firefox, Palemoon does play nice and use GTK2.
 
Old 10-06-2017, 12:32 PM   #141
ttk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badbetty View Post
How secure (whatever that means) is Palemoon I wonder rhetorically speaking.
Most of the Pale Moon development effort consists of bugfixes and security patches, much much less adding features, refactoring or rewriting interfaces (these activities introduce bugs and security vulnerabilities). As such, I would expect Pale Moon to be more secure than Firefox. It's certainly less buggy, and that is the main reason I use it.

On the other hand, there are also fewer people using Pale Moon and finding security vulnerabilities compared to Firefox, but it is difficult to quantify the effects of this.
 
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Old 10-06-2017, 12:40 PM   #142
cwizardone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
Yeah, but no WebRTC support on Pale Moon? Jeez! .....
But, but..... isn't webRTC one more invasion of a user's privacy?

Quote:
What is my local IP Address?

How does this detection work?

One of the new additions to some modern browsers is WebRTC.

WebRTC is an API which is geared at enabling real-time in-browser communications without the need for extra plugins - think: "in-browser video chat without extra plugins". It holds a lot of potential for the future of online communication and is an exciting development.

A developer, Nathan Vander Wilt has discovered a way to make the WebRTC API divulge your machine's local IP address (or addresses; if you have more than one; for example if your laptop is plugged into ethernet but also has a wireless connection).

Is it something I need to worry about?

It depends.

On one hand, it might be handy for your tech support team to know what the internal IP address of your workstation is (especially if they're working remotely and need to help you by logging on to your computer). And I guess it's also pretty cool because until recently, all it was possible to do was detect your external IP address.

However it is just one more bit of information that used to be private which can now be obtained about you and your computer. So attackers who are trying to analyze you and your set up have another way of getting more information about you.

Most startlingly, this technique can not only be used to get your IP address, but can be turned into a sort of "nmap" like tool; to scan your entire internal network. This is particularly troubling for businesses and universities. It means that if you visit a malicious website, you could inadvertently leak details such as the internal network structure to attackers.

Disabling it.
It is possible to diable WebRTC in some web browsers. One day we'll have a guide about how to do this.....
https://www.whatismybrowser.com/dete...cal-ip-address

Last edited by cwizardone; 10-06-2017 at 04:10 PM.
 
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Old 10-06-2017, 02:52 PM   #143
atelszewski
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Hi,

WebUSB anybody?

--
Best regards,
Andrzej Telszewski
 
Old 10-06-2017, 04:38 PM   #144
Darth Vader
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwizardone View Post
But, but..... isn't webRTC one more invasion of a user's privacy?



https://www.whatismybrowser.com/dete...cal-ip-address
Look, I think this local IP, usually at mercy of your own router's DHCP, has exactly zero value as information beyond its WebRTC usage, no sense for us to go paranoia for nothing...

You can imagine how many people has the local IP like is one of me right now 168.192.1.2 ? Probably millions.

And what you do with this information that my local IP is 168.192.1.2, public disclosed by me ?

Last edited by Darth Vader; 10-06-2017 at 04:52 PM.
 
Old 10-06-2017, 04:55 PM   #145
cwizardone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
.......You can imagine how many people has the local IP like is one of me right now 168.192.1.2 ? Probably millions.
Then add,

2601:642:4400:2824:72d5:6ad8:ce2c:e02f

or whatever.
 
Old 10-06-2017, 05:35 PM   #146
Alien Bob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
Look, I think this local IP, usually at mercy of your own router's DHCP, has exactly zero value as information beyond its WebRTC usage, no sense for us to go paranoia for nothing...

You can imagine how many people has the local IP like is one of me right now 168.192.1.2 ? Probably millions.

And what you do with this information that my local IP is 168.192.1.2, public disclosed by me ?
Tsk tsk... where did your knowledge about private IP ranges go...

The IP you refer to is actually a public IP owned by Sprint, in the US.
 
Old 10-06-2017, 06:24 PM   #147
Darth Vader
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alien Bob View Post
Tsk tsk... where did your knowledge about private IP ranges go...

The IP you refer to is actually a public IP owned by Sprint, in the US.
Was a bit of joke, also to confuse the curious bots...

Anyway, I guessed that an educated Slackwarian like you (and other fellows here) will figure out immediately about what real local IP I talk.

Last edited by Darth Vader; 10-06-2017 at 06:26 PM.
 
Old 10-08-2017, 01:31 PM   #148
elcore
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Spent 2 hours today trying to null the 'newTab' program out of firefox source code.
It's very annoying and hard to rip out, eventually I've replaced it with blank xhtml page, but not before preprocessor.py broke the build twice.
Had to patch the preprocessor to remove the check, and find where it has hidden symlinks under 7 subdirectories.

Problem with this javascript program is that it loads every time new tab is opened, even if override is there to replace it with blank page.
Palemoon's got a proper override that actually overrides the page, and doesn't run any code if the option is set.
Firefox runs the newTab program every time anyway and then quickly covers it with blank, this is something normally found in malware, not a popular browser.

It's regression, used to work fine before they integrated ads into the page. Hopefully Palemoon will keep this functionality intact.
 
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Old 10-12-2017, 12:41 PM   #149
Fat_Elvis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elcore View Post
Spent 2 hours today trying to null the 'newTab' program out of firefox source code.
It's very annoying and hard to rip out, eventually I've replaced it with blank xhtml page, but not before preprocessor.py broke the build twice.
Had to patch the preprocessor to remove the check, and find where it has hidden symlinks under 7 subdirectories.

Problem with this javascript program is that it loads every time new tab is opened, even if override is there to replace it with blank page.
Palemoon's got a proper override that actually overrides the page, and doesn't run any code if the option is set.
Firefox runs the newTab program every time anyway and then quickly covers it with blank, this is something normally found in malware, not a popular browser.

It's regression, used to work fine before they integrated ads into the page. Hopefully Palemoon will keep this functionality intact.
I have had a chuckle at this post at your expense, I'm sorry to say.

You're a brave person to go poking into the source code of Firefox.

Last edited by Fat_Elvis; 10-12-2017 at 12:42 PM.
 
Old 10-12-2017, 10:45 PM   #150
elcore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat_Elvis View Post
I have had a chuckle at this post at your expense, I'm sorry to say.

You're a brave person to go poking into the source code of Firefox.
I was bored that day, couldn't care any less about mozilla codebase or the company in general.
Just want to cut the ads off at the root instead of hiding them. not really interested in their source.
 
  


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