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Old 02-15-2009, 02:27 PM   #76
gargamel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adriv View Post
Yes, here.
And a puma is really known to be a cat with three stripes, right?

gargamel
 
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Old 02-15-2009, 02:56 PM   #77
adriv
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gargamel View Post
And a puma is really known to be a cat with three stripes, right?

gargamel
No, that's Umbro.
 
Old 02-15-2009, 03:15 PM   #78
Drakeo
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Quote:
It's alive
Quote:
Pumas also rocked in the 70's
I just wonder what people think of ubuntu vs slackware sence the 2.6.27.7 kernel and the new 2.6.28 kernel tree. Looking at the severe troubles of v4l2 and other multimedia. took 20 minutes and slackbuild.org to get thing right with slackware.12.2
But I have spent many hours helping Ubuntu people with hardware issuses.

Just think I will have to do it again in a few more months. scary. slackpkg has been around a long time. Oh well life is good slack in time saves nine.

The deb builds with out kernel patches that never build they just put the source out there and said compile it. That sounds harsh but if you want an index of the everyday drivers that Ubuntu just got behind and left it to the locals to fend for them selves. Ubuntu was supposed to be the big multimedia.
They were smart to stay with the 2.6.24 kernel for hardy heron. and keep supporting it.
you think google had anything to do with that?

I believe if you have a strong stable tree then the roots will stay deep in the ground.
 
Old 02-15-2009, 10:44 PM   #79
alMubarmij
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Ubuntu maybe good for some beginner users. Slackware still for advanced on who is like commmand-line.
 
Old 02-17-2009, 09:23 AM   #80
w1k0
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Ubuntu is for beginners and Slackware is for advanced users. That's true. Beginners have problems with Slackware and advanced users have problems with Ubuntu. A few months ago I tried Ubuntu, openSUSE, and Fedora. These are very complicated Linuces. They do something and you have to guess what they do. If you try to do something they don't allow you to do that.
 
Old 02-17-2009, 01:19 PM   #81
AlphaSigmaOne
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^
Nonsense. I started both Ubuntu Slackware as a beginner. Ubuntu is just more flashy; Slack is much more intuitive.

I had to use a beginners' guide to use both. The Ubuntu guide just told me what to do--"Caught me the fish." The Slackware guide explained what and why I was doing it--"taught me to fish."
 
Old 02-18-2009, 06:00 PM   #82
bm1
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I use Slack because its the closest to FreeBSD. I keep forgeting where all the config files are stored when switching linux flavours.

bm
 
Old 02-19-2009, 12:09 AM   #83
hitest
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by bm1 View Post
I use Slack because its the closest to FreeBSD. I keep forgeting where all the config files are stored when switching linux flavours.

bm
Agreed. FreeBSD is nice. But, Slackware will always be #1 for me!
 
Old 07-22-2009, 11:18 AM   #84
Afroman10496
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Slackware VS Ubuntu

Ubuntu is great, not only because it's user friendly, but you can do most of what Slackware does in it, GUI or CUI
 
Old 07-23-2009, 05:48 PM   #85
Vgui
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I say try them both and use what works best, in each situation.

I use Slackware 12.2 on my main desktop computer, slowly upgraded from a 10.2 install a few years ago. I have everything customized exactly as I want, but find I don't bother keeping up with current software as much as I used to. Nor do I really have the desire to endlessly tweak the install. But the good thing is it still works and works and works and doesn't degrade or randomly crash or anything. It's like an operating system should be: fast, rock solid reliable, secure, and most important invisible.

Then on my laptop I use Xubuntu 9.04. It was simple to install and was ready to rock out of the box, which impressed me because I was out of touch with how far Linux distros have come in terms of automatic setup (and making everything easy for you). But I don't do anything fancy on that laptop, otherwise I might find Xubuntu a bit...constraining?...limiting? Either way, it would have to annoy me a lot before I went through the effort of putting on and tweaking another Slackware install (especially because I find laptop hardware more prone to cause config problems).

Basically *Ubuntu if you want to do quickly do generic tasks without worrying about why there are so many processes running, or why it uses so much more RAM, or what exactly is going on under the hood. So basically closer to a Linux version of Windows XP (including annoying "Update Now?" bubbles).
Then I'd say use Slackware if you want to put in a lot of front-loaded effort to configure it...but once that is done you can use the same install forrreeeever. Plus you can do fun things like have 100 packages installed (plus understanding the purpose of each) instead of 1200+ on *Ubuntu.
 
Old 07-23-2009, 06:39 PM   #86
digger95
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I like them both for what they are. I'll never use anything but Slackware now, but it was Ubuntu that got me away from Windows and into Linux, so in that respect it is deserving of praise.
 
Old 07-23-2009, 06:53 PM   #87
vigi
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oholiab View Post
...Oh...kay

Personally I think you're better to stick with Slack. If you're as far as having things configured and working in Slack, then its gonna be the same as any other distribution but... well... cleaner I guess cos you would have built it from the ground up.

Also, you know what they say,

To learn Ubuntu use Ubuntu,
To learn Linux...

meh, I'm sure you've heard it already!
I'll second that!
I have just deleted ubuntu after 3years, in favour of slackware. Ubuntu is great, however there is nothing like slackware for slability and consistency, if you are a control freak. Ubuntu/debian certainly has a terrific repository - however after a while your system ends up like a stew or a windows system. Slackware is a solid base OS to build your own custom system.
 
Old 07-23-2009, 07:03 PM   #88
dxangel
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i thought what he said was rather sweet (re women) and not at all offensive.

I cant contribute much to the discussion as i think the last time i used Slack was 1999 or so - i still have a certain fondness for it though.

( tho would like to point out that whoever said theyre the same, slack is BSD-based, while Debian is sys-v, so not *entirely* the same. hehe. )
 
Old 07-23-2009, 08:05 PM   #89
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dxangel View Post
I cant contribute much to the discussion as i think the last time i used Slack was 1999 or so - i still have a certain fondness for it though.
)
Dude...it is still the same, great Slackware. Give it a try, it will give you a pleasing alternative to whatever you're running now!
 
Old 07-23-2009, 08:30 PM   #90
escaflown
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I will say it's a matter of personal needs. Personally, I prefer Slackware but I can also understand that other people will have the tendency to lean toward Ubuntu for its "pretended" user-friendly superiority.
The whole point is that you pick the distribution that is more compatible with your definition of "user-friendly".
 
  


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