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Old 01-20-2010, 12:25 PM   #136
itsbrad212
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Quote:
You surely mean:
You can't sudo su without root's password like on Ubuntu?
No, I meant if you type 'su root' into an ubuntu terminal, at least by default, you will not be able to login as root

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~sHyLoCk~ View Post
This is a great constructive, informative and inspiring post which absolutely justifies the thread resurrection! Thanks for this information!
Um, your post was even less constructive. :P

Last edited by itsbrad212; 01-20-2010 at 12:28 PM.
 
Click here to see the post LQ members have rated as the most helpful post in this thread.
Old 01-21-2010, 01:46 AM   #137
ROXR
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Ubuntu is good but there are some problems. It try to do what is supposedly difficult to easy and and hard that it's easy towards a people trained to use proprietary systems like Windows, a nightmare system where something breaks.
The problem of bloatware came because download and install software manager who you never can't know who and where has installed żlibrary swap library?, the updates are often fatal because it not update enough and destroys the system.
It is far from true simplicity and walks toward a future that is tailored to its creators, for me need to know too linux for bring stable ubuntu.
It Is only my perception
 
Old 01-21-2010, 04:02 AM   #138
vince4amy
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I don't like Ubuntu much at all (I don't mind Debian), though I would use it over Arch anyday. I made a couple of videos about Ubuntu actually:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqQMq...x=0&playnext=1

They may not be to everyones taste and don't watch them if you don't like swearing. I try to look at it from two angles, as a new user and an experienced user as you'll tell when you watch them.

Slackware really makes you appreciate complete control over your system though without some package manager dictating to you what you can and cannot install regarding dependency breakage.

Last edited by vince4amy; 01-21-2010 at 04:04 AM.
 
Old 01-21-2010, 11:41 AM   #139
SCerovec
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by itsbrad212 View Post
No, I meant if you type 'su root' into an ubuntu terminal, at least by default, you will not be able to login as root
Because You don't have to,

Code:
sudo su
will make You root (sadly) on a "default" install


refer to the last paragraph of my previous post

Quote:
Security is a matter of being informed, not merely provided with, or?
Did You ever try to
Code:
sudo su
on Your Ubuntu box?

And what's the point preventing someone already knowing the password of root (=has trust of the system owner) of becoming root in the X nested terminal?

Anyhow he can [Ctrl][Shift][F6] and login as one there?

Or she/he should be able to?

But what do I know?
 
Old 01-21-2010, 01:17 PM   #140
Intel_
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+1 for Slackware. When I was with ubuntu I used auto partitioning and I didn't know how to creat the partitions. With slackware I learned it.
 
Old 01-21-2010, 01:28 PM   #141
piratesmack
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Red face

edit

Last edited by piratesmack; 01-21-2010 at 01:32 PM. Reason: eh
 
Old 01-21-2010, 04:10 PM   #142
gauchao
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For me, it is the same thing as comparing Maseratti with Kia... ie, no comparison, sorry.
 
Old 01-21-2010, 05:07 PM   #143
amiga32
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This thread is now about Mad Max VS Road Warrior
 
Old 01-21-2010, 06:45 PM   #144
brianL
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Hey!!! Everybody use the distro that suits them best. Stop picking on poor little Slack!
 
Old 01-23-2010, 01:17 PM   #145
anGeR
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If you need windows-like-click-and-make-it-happen distro then go for Ubuntu. But if you want to see how deep rabbit hole goes, stick to slack

Your choice
 
Old 01-23-2010, 01:43 PM   #146
cola
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by camphor View Post
Ubuntu is an African word meaning, "Slackware is too hard."
Code:
Ubuntu is an African word meaning, "Slackware is too hard."
 
Old 01-23-2010, 02:04 PM   #147
damgar
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With my newest build I'm now evenly split 2-2 Slackware64-current/Ubuntu 9.0.4. I like them both for what they do. My newest machine, built for the sole purpose of performing/getting through the LFS book FINALLY, and as quick as possible is of course running Slack as is my previous build that hosts files and I just use when I'm wanting to play.

My laptop that I use in my job for a WISP in the field and the machine for the wife/kids/guests both run Ubuntu 9.0.4 with no regrets. It is totally a matter of taste, time, and inclination.

If I'm voting my fav it's Slack hands down, if I'm voting for a distro to get people off the M$ addiction that I'll have to support, I'd probably vote for Ubuntu, or possibly even Mandriva. I still like the OTB look and feel of Mandriva quite a lot.
 
Old 01-23-2010, 02:41 PM   #148
Dinithion
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gauchao View Post
For me, it is the same thing as comparing Maseratti with Kia... ie, no comparison, sorry.
I totally agree. My grandmother would probably enjoy her Kia, but every sensible person would go for slackware
 
Old 01-23-2010, 03:35 PM   #149
devwatchdog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ROXR View Post
Ubuntu is good but there are some problems. It try to do what is supposedly difficult to easy and and hard that it's easy towards a people trained to use proprietary systems like Windows, a nightmare system where something breaks.
The problem of bloatware came because download and install software manager who you never can't know who and where has installed żlibrary swap library?, the updates are often fatal because it not update enough and destroys the system.
It is far from true simplicity and walks toward a future that is tailored to its creators, for me need to know too linux for bring stable ubuntu.
It Is only my perception
Failing updates certainly hasn't been the case in my experience with Ubuntu. Something I did realize is that you need a pretty healthy size for the /boot partition on a Ubuntu system due to the kernel updates coming in quite often. The old kernel packages aren't removed, so they pile up and can fill up a 100mb /boot partition pretty quick. It's just a matter of cleaning out the old kernels every so often, no big deal. I seem to recall I used 20mb /boot partitions several years ago.

I used Slackware for seven years, then switched over to Ubuntu a few years ago, and really don't have any complaints about either OS. It's System V versus BSD, but other than that the underlying architecture is Linux. I like the desktop better on Ubuntu, not a big fan of KDE, and especially not of what I saw on Slackware 13.

I've set up plenty of development software on Ubuntu, such as jdeveloper and Eclipse, along with the associated app servers Weblogic and Tomcat, plus the backend databases of postgresql and MySQL. Didn't try to install Oracle 11g on it, though. Those databases go on dedicated CentOS/Redhat servers.

Setting up a Slackware system with the same software would be a bit more work, but possible nonetheless.

As has been pointed out, I do prefer Slackware for ancient systems, such as the IBM Thinkpad 240 300Mhz, 192mb RAM laptop I have. (great machine! -- and I still get two hours out of the battery on it) That one I typically use for testing wireless connectivity. It has a serial port and is useful for checking out router/firewall gear that might not be cooperating. I will say I don't think it would be too hard to take a Ubuntu install and end up with the same basic configuration I have on that system. Turn off some extraneous services/processes that are running, and change the default run level is about it.

They both work for me, and I still use both. Neither have presented any real issues that I can recall. And if there was something, it was usually a user error rather than the OS.

Last edited by devwatchdog; 01-23-2010 at 03:42 PM.
 
Old 01-24-2010, 12:45 AM   #150
fancylad
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i just recently started using slackware because i got sick of "smart" package managment tools breaking my systems. i found this both with debian as well as ubuntu. don't get me wrong, apt can be very handy and when it works it's delightful, but when it starts telling you what you can and can't install it is actually much easier to just take care of the dependencies yourself. sometimes this is the fault of the people who are creating the dpkg's. i have had to edit some dpkg's myself to remove some dependencies that really weren't needed just so that i could install a pkg that supposedly conflicted with another one. i also think that slackware in many ways is easier to administer than ubuntu. as great as ubuntu is there are times when it doesn't work quite right and often you have to end up jumping through a bunch of hoops just to fix it. slackware on the other hand is much simpler and to the point. slackware really is linux where i think ubuntu is just ubuntu if that makes any sense.

also i found that there were way too many updates with ubuntu. really, how many kernel updates do you need to do in a week?

Last edited by fancylad; 01-24-2010 at 12:50 AM.
 
  


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