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Old 03-28-2018, 10:41 AM   #1
globetrotterdk
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Slackware project - Acer Aspire One 725 netbook.


I am considering moving my Acer Aspire One 725 netbook from Devuan to Slackware. There are a number of issues with doing this - first and foremost the weak hardware. Neither the CPU (AMD C60) nor the GPU (Radeon HD 6290) can pull very much. I use it in place of a Linux tablet, when I have a lot of music gear to lug around.

My current Devuan system is a stripped down i3wm that I use mainly to play audio and video, as well as write score sheets (Musescore). The question is how to get a Slackware system on this netbook, when the recommended method simply won't do as there is too much lag on audio/video?

I considered testing an XFCE Slackware Live edition to get a reference, but there doesn't seem to be a setup2hd script when the .iso file is burned and booted. I tried downloading a copy of the setup2hd script, but it kept prompting me for the already mounted directory.

Alternatively (which I would prefer), I could use a stock install by way of tagfiles, but there doesn't seem to be much documentation about using tagiles to install minimal(ish) systems. I should emphasize that if I am to recreate a similar Slackware version of my Devuan install, everything is pretty much stock, just with a lot less overhead (no pulseaudio, i3wm instead of more demanding DEs and WMs), but I still have CUPS, usb pen drive automount, (wicd instead of Network Manager) and applets running (in i3blocks).

Any suggestions are appreciated.
 
Old 03-28-2018, 12:29 PM   #2
mralk3
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I have an Asus EeePC 2G Surf, one of the first models released. I haven't turned it on in a while, but if memory servers me right, it has 512MB Ram, a 2GB hard disk, and some old Intel 900MHz Celeron processor. I run Slackware 14.2 on it with Fluxbox. I use the links web browser and mutt for email on it. If Slackware runs on that, then I do not doubt you can do the same with your higher grade hardware.

Here are the specs to the Asus I mentioned.


The Slackware installer is not CPU or memory intensive at all. There is no reason you cannot boot up the Slackware installation DVD, or even the usbboot.img and do a network installation using the closest Slackware mirror.

A small installation of Slackware can be done. Here is a blog entry by Ruari discussing it.

If you find you are missing a package, use slackpkg to download the missing library or package containing a file. The file-search function of slackpkg is your friend when fleshing out a minimal installation of Slackware.
Code:
slackpkg file-search filename
Remember that Slackware is not Debian. A full installation is recommended if you have the disk space. Used disk space does not equate to RAM usage or CPU usage if the installed packages on your hard disk are not in use. Disable everything you do not need at boot and it's likely a full installation will serve you better.
Edit: Spelling

Last edited by mralk3; 03-28-2018 at 12:33 PM.
 
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Old 03-28-2018, 03:36 PM   #3
OldHolborn
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@globetrotterdk

I have the predecessor to the 725, the 722 - you have USB3, I don't.

It has the C-60 and HD6290 as well, so I know your pain!

But it's my day2day lugabout and for that it serves well enough, an SSD and 4GB of ram, took a little bit of edge off the sluggishness and from memory the battery usage aswell. ( I've lost the comparison figures sorry )

As @mralk3 says, usbboot.img does the trick nicely.

I use mine with an encrypted fs (it's a laptop - all should be), and with a lightweight window manager (fluxbox) and firefox suitably limited (u-block & noscript), it does the job.

Playing video - it plays better with vlc on Slackware than when dual booted to Windows7 (kept for college work).

I don't know if yours shares the same tendency to overheat - meaning that 1.3GHz boost is fable-like - but if the lefthand side of the keyboard around the D key is very very springy then that's where the intake for the cpu-fan is - prise up the keyboard and the whole machine gets a lot faster!

It's all 2nd hand (upgrades as well), so cost me not-a-lot, has a 12inch screen and will also run Qemu at a push ( the C-60 has virtualisation functions that Intel's of that budget bracket did not have ).

Go for it!
 
Old 03-28-2018, 03:37 PM   #4
globetrotterdk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mralk3 View Post
I have an Asus EeePC 2G Surf, one of the first models released. I haven't turned it on in a while, but if memory servers me right, it has 512MB Ram, a 2GB hard disk, and some old Intel 900MHz Celeron processor. I run Slackware 14.2 on it with Fluxbox. I use the links web browser and mutt for email on it. If Slackware runs on that, then I do not doubt you can do the same with your higher grade hardware.
Thanks for the reply. I need Vivaldi as browser for video and MIDI-to-web access, so a browser like links is unfortunately irrelevant for me. Likewise Musescore (again with MIDI playback) demands a completely different resource level than links and mutt. Therefore the need to cut resources elsewhere. As I also stated, a full install gives audio/video delay and stutter... I'll take a look at the small install that you mention.

Last edited by globetrotterdk; 03-28-2018 at 03:42 PM.
 
Old 03-28-2018, 03:48 PM   #5
Lysander666
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globetrotter, I am running my Slack setup on a netbook which is three years older than yours, a Samsung n110 manufactured in 2009. I don't have much more to add than the others here other than to say yes, it's certainly possible. In fact I've installed Slack twice on it. I'm running a 1.6Ghz Atom and 2GB RAM. To be honest, installation is a breeze on it.

I'm running LXDE for a DE. For web browsing/email I use Qupzilla, for video I use smplayer, for YouTube QMPLay2 and for audio Audacious. Audacity runs well though OBS is problematic - I have to run it entirely through the CPU which is ~70% utilisation. Compiling software packages is relatively fine as long as I'm not attempting something of the magnitude of openjdk or qt5. Audacity compiled in about an hour or so if I remember correctly. It's a great machine still and it runs Slack nicely.

Last edited by Lysander666; 03-28-2018 at 03:51 PM.
 
Old 03-28-2018, 03:49 PM   #6
Didier Spaier
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Let me state this again, in bold: Only running software can cause a delay. No delay can ever occur from installed software that are not in use.
 
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Old 03-28-2018, 04:11 PM   #7
BratPit
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I have got Acer Aspire ONE with Intel Atom and Slackware 13.37 on it.
NOt full install but not stripped too much.

The important thing is how much RAM is on it.
I have got 1 GB so the obvious choice is x86 architecture.
With LXDE it takes only 80 MB Ram used for the system.
Goes well for quite some time.
 
Old 03-28-2018, 04:27 PM   #8
volkerdi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BratPit View Post
I have got Acer Aspire ONE with Intel Atom and Slackware 13.37 on it.
NOt full install but not stripped too much.

The important thing is how much RAM is on it.
I have got 1 GB so the obvious choice is x86 architecture.
With LXDE it takes only 80 MB Ram used for the system.
Goes well for quite some time.
The majority of netbooks with an Atom processor don't support x86_64 anyway. That said, I don't believe the amount of memory is ever a good reason to choose x86 over x86_64. I always recommend x86_64 if the machine will support it, and haven't seen significantly increased memory usage in 64-bit mode versus 32-bit mode.
 
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Old 03-28-2018, 04:53 PM   #9
mralk3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotterdk View Post
Thanks for the reply. I need Vivaldi as browser for video and MIDI-to-web access, so a browser like links is unfortunately irrelevant for me. Likewise Musescore (again with MIDI playback) demands a completely different resource level than links and mutt. Therefore the need to cut resources elsewhere. As I also stated, a full install gives audio/video delay and stutter... I'll take a look at the small install that you mention.
My example was to point out that if hardware with far less resources can run Slackware then your laptop should be just fine. I wasn't suggesting that you should use links and mutt.
 
Old 03-29-2018, 01:56 AM   #10
BratPit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by volkerdi View Post
The majority of netbooks with an Atom processor don't support x86_64 anyway. That said, I don't believe the amount of memory is ever a good reason to choose x86 over x86_64. I always recommend x86_64 if the machine will support it, and haven't seen significantly increased memory usage in 64-bit mode versus 32-bit mode.
Yes.I've got 270 Atom that is only x86.I do not know others Atom's.
System with recent x86 Firefox consume about 500MB.
But 1GB memory is a pain today for x86_64.
On my desktop 64 bit Slackware with the same LXDE + some additional features consume ~300MB of RAM .With Chromium 2.5GB.
Today's browsers consume much more memory to fit in 1GB so x86 is somewhat workaround in some cases.
 
Old 03-29-2018, 03:22 AM   #11
globetrotterdk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Didier Spaier View Post
Let me state this again, in bold: Only running software can cause a delay. No delay can ever occur from installed software that are not in use.
Hi Didier. I don't think that this is an issue about software. What I call overhead, I assume is how many processes are running and how many resources they use. If the same software (Vivaldi, Musescore, etc.) is used, and with a full install audio/video stutters and goes out of sync, while a system with fewer processes does not, the logical conclusion for me is that the processes running need to be reduced and/or replaced with similar processes that demand fewer resources to achieve the same result. Is that incorrect? Remember that I need to use some specific software that can do specific things, not easily replaced. Both Vivaldi and Musescore have MIDI, as well as other capabilities, that can't easily be replaced by other programs. As far as I understand, even if there were viable program alternatives, it seems to me that using lighter (less resource demanding alternatives) is an attempt at compensating for the amount of resources that the stock (full install) system demands. Isn't that at least part of your motivation for creating your own Slint distro? Otherwise, why not just add the extras to a Slackware full install as StudioWare does?

Last edited by globetrotterdk; 03-29-2018 at 03:23 AM.
 
Old 03-29-2018, 03:27 AM   #12
globetrotterdk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mralk3 View Post
My example was to point out that if hardware with far less resources can run Slackware then your laptop should be just fine. I wasn't suggesting that you should use links and mutt.
Ahh. Sorry for the misunderstanding. Please try to look at my reply to Didier and tell me if I am misunderstanding the situation. I have tried to make my conundrum clearer and to the point.
 
Old 03-29-2018, 04:36 AM   #13
ponce
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Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotterdk View Post
Hi Didier. I don't think that this is an issue about software. What I call overhead, I assume is how many processes are running and how many resources they use. If the same software (Vivaldi, Musescore, etc.) is used, and with a full install audio/video stutters and goes out of sync, while a system with fewer processes does not, the logical conclusion for me is that the processes running need to be reduced and/or replaced with similar processes that demand fewer resources to achieve the same result. Is that incorrect? Remember that I need to use some specific software that can do specific things, not easily replaced. Both Vivaldi and Musescore have MIDI, as well as other capabilities, that can't easily be replaced by other programs. As far as I understand, even if there were viable program alternatives, it seems to me that using lighter (less resource demanding alternatives) is an attempt at compensating for the amount of resources that the stock (full install) system demands. Isn't that at least part of your motivation for creating your own Slint distro? Otherwise, why not just add the extras to a Slackware full install as StudioWare does?
like Didier tried to explain to you it's not that if you will do a full installation you will have any delays just because additional software that you might not use is installed in your hard drive.
you will have additional ram and cpu busy if you explicitly use it.
if you, for example, install LXDE over a slackware full installation and just use it in place of the desktop environment that Slackware provides you will have the same behaviour and you will use the same resources if you would have left the xfce and the kde series out of your operating system.
 
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Old 03-29-2018, 05:25 AM   #14
Didier Spaier
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@ globetrotterdk I will just add to Matteo's answer, which is better worded than I could have done myself, quoting your previous post below:
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotterdk View Post
As far as I understand, even if there were viable program alternatives, it seems to me that using lighter (less resource demanding alternatives) is an attempt at compensating for the amount of resources that the stock (full install) system demands.
As explained by Matteo, what matters is the application you use, not installed ones: you can use a less demanding application while still having a more demanding installed, so there is no need for a compensation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotterdk View Post
Isn't that at least part of your motivation for creating your own Slint distro? Otherwise, why not just add the extras to a Slackware full install as StudioWare does?
No. Slint does add several software to a "near genuine" (some packages are modified) Slackware full install (and in addition allows only a full installation, only KDE and associated apps is optional), and a full installation needs 11G on hard disk or SSD, which is more than Slackware.

To know more about my motivation and on which respect Slint differs from Slackware just have a look at http://slint.fr

Last edited by Didier Spaier; 03-29-2018 at 06:54 AM. Reason: Dot ending a sentence added.
 
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Old 03-29-2018, 08:41 AM   #15
globetrotterdk
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OK, I'll trust you guys and give it a try I'll let you know how I get on.
 
  


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