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Old 07-21-2011, 04:07 PM   #1
idnotcrae
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Smile Slackware is the most Unix-like distro !


I hear that all the time " Slackware is the most unix-like distro ". i did't know if it is true or not and i also did not use any other distros, may be i saw SUSE before and installed it for 3 or 4 days i guess !!. and then i installed Slackware, i duno what had happened with Slackware, although i'm not that geek who can make use of the differences between linux distros and say this is good and others not so good, cuz i know only the essentials about linux and actually all distro are same to me (linux),But once i saw Slackware, i just felt love with her at the first sight .

Luck made me use Solaris for about 3 months. and i'm telling my self ,,, haaa um using Solaris --> and Solaris is Unix --> and slackware is most unix-like --> so i think Solaris is the best and it can be the mom of Slackware

After 3 monthes i fscked Solaris off and went back to my beautiful darkstar cuz i really missed having fun , and from that time i'm telling my self it does not matter if slackware is the most unix-like or not cuz i think that all UNIX should be like Slackware for all people to have fun

Last edited by XavierP; 07-21-2011 at 04:36 PM.
 
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Old 07-21-2011, 05:49 PM   #2
Ivshti
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In a technical aspect, this is true. For example, Slackware sticks to the standard UNIX init with BSD-style init scripts while other distributions which to other init systems.
 
Old 07-21-2011, 07:06 PM   #3
dh2k
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A personal view-point, I agree.

I would love to hear from a professional and business view-point though - and how important *unix is compared to industry standards (RHEL etc) - perception from gurus and other professionals would be very insightful.
 
Old 07-24-2011, 02:36 AM   #4
Knightron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivshti View Post
In a technical aspect, this is true. For example, Slackware sticks to the standard UNIX init with BSD-style init scripts while other distributions which to other init systems.
Didn't AT&T UNIX, use the system V init scripts
 
Old 07-24-2011, 03:26 AM   #5
Mark Pettit
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You're right ... up to a point. From Solaris 10 things have changed a lot. And I'm not convinced for the better either. I'm not sure where Solaris is going, but for certain it's not where I'm going. I think what happened is that the old Unix philosophy of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" is lost and somehow they're competing with Windows - not sure why though !
 
Old 07-24-2011, 11:12 AM   #6
tronayne
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Solaris is UNIX -- it's built on AT&T System V release 4 (SVR4) with Berkeley enhancements along with Sun's additions over time. Organizations that have Sun shops will be running Solaris on their severs and that may be Solaris 8 or 10 depending upon the organization's standards -- 8 is pretty solid and dependable where 10 has lots of gee-whiz, golly-wow features. Some update, some don't (but new Sun boxes come with 10). With Oracle now owning Sun heaven only knows what's going to happen, but that's another story.

Bear in mind that Linux is not UNIX (in fact, our favorite, GNU, actually means "Gnu's not UNIX" and the critter, a Gnu, that's the logo image just happened to be handy and everything worked out). Linux is the kernel (as is UNIX -- the kernel) surrounded by utilities and applications. That both Linux and UNIX distributions look, feel and pretty much work alike is just an added bonus. I'm not talking about the eye candy here, I'm talking open a console and start typing and it's pretty hard to tell whether you're looking at UNIX or Linux -- and that, friends and neighbors, is a Good Thing.

I go back a ways with UNIX -- I have the 9-track tapes laying around somewhere with AT&T's System 3 (even though I don't know where I'd find a tape drive to read the things). That's early 1980's, truly ancient (and, yeah, I've only got a couple of years to 70 some I'm pretty old, creaky and cranky too). I spent quite a few years doing software engineering, data base design and engineering and, finally, application development and support for systems running on a Sun farm doing multiple-terabyte data bases.

I valued then and I value now (and organizations have and continue to value) stability and dependability over any sort of bleeding-edge technological wonder-toys. Organization server farms have to work 24/7 with as few problems as possible to be of any use and companies are slow to adopt the latest and greatest until it's been out there proving itself over time. They'll have development servers that are used to assure that existing applications (you know, the stuff you get paid for?) work properly with as little fuss and bother as possible. New release of the data base management system? Put it on a development box and see how much screwing around we're going to have to do to migrate. It can be a slow, frustrating path but it's the path that keeps to doors open and the paycheck coming.

I was introduced to Slackware... uh, I'm not sure when, sometime in the 90's and it came on a set of CD-ROMs. The fellow that suggested Slackware, our network guru, suggested it because it was (and remains as far as I can tell) the most like Solaris. Told me I wouldn't really notice the difference and, guess what, I didn't. Oh, there's little differences here and there, some standard utilities don't quite look and work exactly the same (open source tends to be Berkeley-ized as far as I can tell) but that's just nit-picking and not worth a whole lot of time and effort to complain aobut.

What I valued about Solaris is exactly what I value about Slackware: un-fooled-around-with, rock solid, dependable, runs forever, comes with everything you could possibly need and it's supported by a team of folks that (obviously) know what they're doing led by a fellow that appears to believe in If It Ain't Broke Don't Screw With It; onward and upward when it makes sense to do so. For this I am grateful.

Until I moved recently one of my severs was running Slackware 13.x. I was impressed when I shut it down to note that it had been running for 11 months, 24 days. I'd say that's stable and dependable.

I have tried other distributions on and off. I did not like that it was difficult to understand what was going on under the hood and that the router lights were almost constantly going keeping them up to date (with what, one might ask). Too much stuff in the way, too much branding, too much too much. There's a pile of "also-ran's" sitting in a desk drawer somewhere never to see the light of day again.

The conservatism of organizations has been a block to adoption of Linux in the cubical farms -- you'll see Windows boxes everywhere. Every so often there will be a rebel or two running Linux, but, pretty much, it's all Windows all the time. In the server room you'll find Linux boxes doing useful work -- including being big, honking virtual machines instead of shelves occupied by Windows machines gobbling up lots of power and generating lots of heat -- but, on the whole, it's going to be Windows on the floor. The argument is training -- not so much for users but for support personnel; Windows bodies are plentiful and relatively cheap so... guess what. Also, sadly, Linux distributions haven't really gotten to the point that they're appliances: close, real, real close, but not quite there. You and me and other folks like us poo-poo that, pointing out security problems and worms and viruses and all that comes with Windows but organizations... well, organizations tend toward the lowest common denominator and are extremely difficult to move off dead center if change for the better means any added expense (about the only smart thing organizations have done in the past few years was simply refusing Windows Vista -- that, of course, kept Windows XP alive for for too long but there you are).

We don't really know what's going to happen with Sun and Solaris -- dying? Dead? Getting better? On life support? Who knows. Problem is, Sun severs are, truly, high-performance beasts that cannot be replaced by PC platforms. There's just no way to compare a 32 SPARC processor box with a PC; it's just silly to even try. But the big iron is out there, too. Never count out IBM (and Hewlett-Packard and a couple of others) and Big Blue is heavy into Linux so there may be hope yet. And, you know, IBM and H-P both have their own flavors of UNIX...

Anyway, all this is my opinion and we all know that opinions are like noses -- everybody's got at least one and most of 'em smell.

Hope this helps some.
 
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Old 07-24-2011, 12:07 PM   #7
idnotcrae
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ya it helps a lot and added lots of information about both.
thx for ur opinion
 
Old 07-24-2011, 12:25 PM   #8
Ivshti
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knightron View Post
Didn't AT&T UNIX, use the system V init scripts
Honestly the scripts organization does not matter much because you use one daemon for both, configured with the inittab.
Compared to other distributions however, which use totally different init systems, Slackware is most similar to UNIX.

But forget the init system, it's the general spirit that matters, and tronayne did a good job describing it.
Quote:
What I valued about Solaris is exactly what I value about Slackware: un-fooled-around-with, rock solid, dependable, runs forever, comes with everything you could possibly need and it's supported by a team of folks that (obviously) know what they're doing led by a fellow that appears to believe in If It Ain't Broke Don't Screw With It; onward and upward when it makes sense to do so. For this I am grateful.
 
  


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