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Old 05-30-2017, 06:03 AM   #16
Launfal
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Slackware does rock hard


Just wanted to add a "me too!" to all the kudos to Pat and the crew. Here's a real world example of how the Slackware/Slackbuilds workflow transfers easily to other distros.

I was trying out Void Linux over the long weekend (I'm working my way up to Crux) and the install went well, I tried to duplicate my latest Slack desktop for giggles. Got the hang of the package manager, was installing apps, then hit a wall with hplip.

A couple years ago, I couldn't have fixed it and I would have just deleted it and moved on, but now that I'm getting better with manual dependencies, I knew enough to look at the errors and match them up with what I needed to install to fix them. I also had to manually start cups and dbus, but again, working with Slack and being familiar enough with that kind of thing, I cleared those hurdles and moved right along.

There were a few minor niggles that I didn't take the time to work out (I'm thinking it's due to the new fontconfig issue that I've seen messages here about - terminal windows bigger than I expect, fonts not quite the same size, etc) and I couldn't get urxvt to recognize backgroundPixmap, but other than that, it wasn't horrible. If the unthinkable happened and there was no more Slack, I'd give Void a more serious look.

My hplip experience did show me the shortcomings of auto dependency resolution (again - it's the main reason I left Debian). If the packagers don't cover all the bases, it can be a pain to try and get stuff working if you have no idea what's going on behind the scenes.

So thanks to everybody who makes Slack what it is. I wouldn't know half of what I do (which is about 1% of what I want to know) if it was like everything else.

Last edited by Launfal; 05-30-2017 at 06:23 AM.
 
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Old 06-01-2017, 06:12 PM   #17
detpenguin
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I've always had Slackware installed, but tried different flavors as well. I've found maybe 2 I would consider using, openSUSE and Ubuntu, but ultimately I come back to slack. Definitely not the easiest to use, but once you learn it, you know it.
 
Old 06-01-2017, 06:18 PM   #18
notKlaatu
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Me too.

Or:
Me eighteen.

Last edited by notKlaatu; 06-01-2017 at 06:18 PM. Reason: Aww, that's so sweet. My 1000th post on LQ was a thank-you to Slackware.
 
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Old 06-01-2017, 06:27 PM   #19
PROBLEMCHYLD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by notKlaatu View Post
Me too.

Or:
Me eighteen.
Thanks for that Audacity config file, its awesome!!!!!!!
 
Old 06-08-2017, 01:51 PM   #20
cdek
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Here is another grateful user. I started using Linux around 2002. My first distro was Redhat 6.2, I believe. Since then I have tried all kinds of distributions, for ever in search for the perfect system. I never really found it. Eventually I switched over to Mac OS X (huge mistake!) and used that for several years until it became unusable after an automatic update that was supposed to work but didn't. I decided to switch back to Linux and looked for a distro that came with KDE. There weren't that many. I tried Linux Mint, Suse, Manjaro, ..., but none were really great. Then, when I almost gave up, Slackware 14.2 came out, just at the right time! I installed it immediately and I was thrilled. I'm never gonna use anything else now!

The distrowatch slogan is 'put the fun back into computing'. As far as I'm concerned that's Slackware! For the first time in many years I am having fun again, and I'm really using my computer (hardware according to Apple long obsolete) to the fullest extent. The amount of software that I was able to install, thanks to slackbuilds,org, is just amazing!
 
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Old 06-10-2017, 09:01 PM   #21
1337_powerslacker
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I discovered Slackware back in the days of 10.2. Since then, I have found no other distro that is as dependable. When you, as a user, set something, it stays set, until you decide to change it. I am not forced to upgrade anything that is not absolutely necessary. For example, my VLC player is still at 2.0.8, because it has all the features I need, and nothing extra. Automatic dependency resolution is not the holy grail that many others make it out to be. Too many times, when using some of those other distros, I have borked something inadvertently and have a heck of a time trying to back out of it.

Then there is SlackBuilds. I have the luxury of changing it to suit my needs, should the default behavior not be satisfactory.

I can, and have, done everything that users of other Linux distros have done, and feel in no way that I am inferior to any of them. Indeed, I feel strongly that I have the kind of system stability, dependability, and performance that others can only dream of. And that is mainly due to the simplicity of the distro design which, as a trade-off, requires the user get his hands dirty in the administration of his system; but the upside is that customizability is taken to a whole new level. I can compile a custom kernel, patching it as I see fit, while users of other distros have to wait for their distro maintainers to release a new kernel.

My to those dedicated people who take the time to make this distro the finely-crafted piece of workmanship that it is.

Keep it up, guys! Your efforts are most appreciated!!

Happy Slacking, all!

Last edited by 1337_powerslacker; 06-10-2017 at 09:03 PM. Reason: Edited for clarity and accuracy
 
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Old 06-10-2017, 09:20 PM   #22
Richard Cranium
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Back when men were men and the sheep ran like Hell, I had a Toshiba 3100e laying around to use to log into work. (I had *upgraded* it to use an intel 486 chip!)

I tried to install RedHat on that laptop. That failed miserably.

I tried to install Slackware (I'm not sure of the version. Either 2.3 or 3.0. I believe it was 3.0.) and that succeeded.

I'll admit that running X on a Toshiba 3100e was an exercise in pain, but the fact that Slackware worked when RedHat did not stuck in my mind.

I've run Slackware on any machine (other than my current job) that I wanted to use to get work done ever since.

(When I used to work for Nortel Networks, I ran Slackware instead of Windows on the PCs they gave us. Since IT was used to seeing developers running Unix, they never complained about my using Slackware. I never gave them any trouble, either.)

In my current job, I have a MacBook Pro. I dislike it with the heat of 3 suns. It's at least BSD-like, with NeXTStEP crap thrown on top.
 
Old 06-10-2017, 10:46 PM   #23
1337_powerslacker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
In my current job, I have a MacBook Pro. I dislike it with the heat of 3 suns. It's at least BSD-like, with NeXTStEP crap thrown on top.
Only 3 suns? The only machine made by Apple I ever used was an Apple IIe, back when open architecture was prized. Wozniak's creation was truly a masterpiece of ingenuity. Ever since, Apple has gone on a downward spiral. The fact that they are popular is less a testimony to their masterful engineering than the pitiful standard of quality today's society is used to, sadly.
 
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Old 06-10-2017, 11:08 PM   #24
frankbell
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I wore one of my Slackware tee shirts yesterday--the Aztec calendar one. I think I have three Slackware tee shirts and two polo shirts, not to mention the mouse pads and other stuff . . . .

Support your local distro. That's my motto.
 
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Old 06-10-2017, 11:42 PM   #25
Richard Cranium
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1337_powerslacker View Post
Only 3 suns? The only machine made by Apple I ever used was an Apple IIe, back when open architecture was prized. Wozniak's creation was truly a masterpiece of ingenuity. Ever since, Apple has gone on a downward spiral. The fact that they are popular is less a testimony to their masterful engineering than the pitiful standard of quality today's society is used to, sadly.
My first machine was an Apple II+ (bought it in 1981 or 1982 while stationed in Germany). Slots in the back, ROM code disassembled and given to you along with the schematics of the motherboard. You could buy 3rd party cards for video or whatever.

I upgraded and used that machine until ~1990 or so.

Mac comes around. Closed system. Buy Apple or sod off. I sodded off.

I made the mistake of buying my wife an IPhone 5. Biggest piece of shit I've ever seen. Front mike failed in less than a year. It was the ONLY device in my home which was unable to connect to my hostapd WIFI in secure mode. The "Genius Bar" people were no help at all in that problem.

As it so happens, my work MacBook Pro was also unable to connect to my linux hostapd WIFI securely until a software update came out.

Fuck Apple with razor blades. Their products suck (in my opinion). A lot of my work colleagues have the Apple watch and the Apple this and Apple that. Whatever floats their boats, but I'll never buy another Apple product myself.

I'll use it for work, but I'd prefer a Linux desktop over an Apple laptop.
 
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Old 06-11-2017, 01:35 AM   #26
1337_powerslacker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
I wore one of my Slackware tee shirts yesterday--the Aztec calendar one. I think I have three Slackware tee shirts and two polo shirts, not to mention the mouse pads and other stuff . . . .
I put the Mayan calendar logo on LILO. It's still available, in /usr/doc/lilo-24.2/sample. I quite like the look. The fact that it's 5 years old now matters not one bit. Think I'll hold on to it for awhile.
 
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Old 06-11-2017, 02:11 AM   #27
1337_powerslacker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
Their products suck (in my opinion). A lot of my work colleagues have the Apple watch and the Apple this and Apple that. Whatever floats their boats, but I'll never buy another Apple product myself.

I'll use it for work, but I'd prefer a Linux desktop over an Apple laptop.
I totally agree. Give me the stability and predictability of Linux over the whimsy impulses of large corporations with too much say-so in their products' future, with no thought given whatsoever to what customers might think of it. Let others go with that flow if it gives them satisfaction; I haven't been with that crowd since the early days of XP, and I regret my decision not one bit.
 
Old 06-11-2017, 04:48 AM   #28
schmatzler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
I'll use it for work, but I'd prefer a Linux desktop over an Apple laptop.
Same here. I work in media design, so I can't get around it.

A lot of designers use Apple products, because of their looks.
It makes sense to have shiny, glossy products without any cables in your company from the customer viewpoint.

Why?
- They look expensive.
- They look clean.
- When a customer comes in for a meeting, your company looks rich.

The looks are cool, but from a usability point Apple products are absolutely terrible. I have to work on an iMac with MacOS Sierra at work, combined with an Apple Keyboard and the Apple Mouse.

The keyboard is compressed so it can look small, which means there is no numpad. Also the top+down arrow buttons are split in half. There are terrible decisions like the @ key which is on a totally different key combination, while the actual key combination Alt+Q results in pressing CMD+Q. Guess what, it kills the program you are currently running.

The Apple mouse doesn't have a scrollwheel, but a touchpad instead. This is very inaccurate and results in wrong inputs a lot of time. It also can't be charged up while using it, because the connector is on the bottom.

You also need a commercial program to be able to quickly split your program windows on the screen by moving them to one of the edges. This has been working since Windows 7 and KDE 4 (or even 3, maybe?).

I really miss Slackware at work. A task that takes me 30 minutes on an Apple machine with terrible input is done in at least 15 minutes on my Thinkpad X230T with Photoshop and Illustrator (yes, they work in wine :P).
 
Old 06-11-2017, 02:24 PM   #29
Richard Cranium
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At the risk of totally de-railing the thread (and I'll stop doing that with this message), the biggest thing that drives me crazy is Apple's insisting upon putting the menu bar for the focused application on the top of the screen. Thanks. I have a lot of small windows on the screen and I'm used to menu operations being in that window, versus moving the mouse across the real estate to the upper bar. Hate it with the heat of 20 suns. Throw in no focus-follows-mouse (which I use at home) and I (your mileage may vary, of course) end up with a horrible user experience.

pants

Ahem. That's enough ranting for today, I think.
 
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Old 06-11-2017, 06:22 PM   #30
notKlaatu
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I find it ironic that designers/artists/whatever say they must use MacOS because it is well-designed. Wouldn't it be a better exercise to use Slackware, and to design your UI yourself? You don't need to be a programmer to do that; you can use the environment's inbuilt flexibility to customize the user experience. You might even learn a thing or two about design while you're at it. In other words, you'd think MacOS would not appeal to people who value "good design" *because* it doesn't let you change it, and that they would value Slackware and Linux *because* it bends freely to your will.
 
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