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Old 06-29-2004, 07:42 AM   #1
wasabi
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Slackware installation help


Hello all

I recently started using linux about a month ago. I started with Fedora but saw now as being a good time to move to a "grown up" version of linux.

I made it through the partitioning, package selection, and the install (I think) but am left at the command prompt. I am not so good at using the shell only so I am stuck at where to go next. I have tried following the "this is how I do it" thread but I can't seem to get anywhere to edit the files he is talking about. How do I boot into gnome so I could at least see what I am doing?

I may be over my head with Slackware. I was told that the installation and configuration might take a bit longer, but overall, it would be a good thing. So far I am just confused. Am I even ready for slackware? These are all the questions I am asking. Thanks for your help.

Josh
 
Old 06-29-2004, 08:06 AM   #2
aus9
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HI

slackware main site has this for distro that is not version 10

http://www.slackware.com/book/index....rce=c1364.html and if you back up to the /book/ bit you can see the other chapters.

login root
your password
some will say you should adduser but since you can do that within a window manager and you won't connect to the net your choices are

xf86cfg
xf86config and my fav

xfree86setup

to configure your X server assuming you made install selections for the x install folder and window managers in /xap folder or kde or gnome off cd2
 
Old 06-29-2004, 08:07 AM   #3
aus9
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I haven't installed v10 yet so others post its xorg.conf maybe?
 
Old 06-29-2004, 08:15 AM   #4
wasabi
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ok that did not make so much sense to me???

How would I go about launching x, or gnome, or kde for that matter. I chose to install all these packages but cant get any to launch.
 
Old 06-29-2004, 08:38 AM   #5
oneandoneis2
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You have to configure it first via 'xf86config' or the like to make sure it'll work properly - you don't want it to select a screen size your monitor can't support, or be stuck unable to use the mouse, after all.

Then use 'xwmconfig' to make sure it'll boot into Gnome

Then type 'startx' to launch X and Gnome.

Once you're sure it'll work, you can set it up to always boot to runlevel 4, which is the graphical login prompt.
 
Old 06-29-2004, 08:40 AM   #6
jsmarshall85
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you have to run those commands after you login as root, this will configure your x-window system. then once that is done you can type startx at the command line and whatever default gui you told the install to use will launch. this is assuming you installed gnome from disc 2 during the installation
 
Old 06-29-2004, 08:55 AM   #7
wasabi
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Quote:


You have to configure it first via 'xf86config' or the like to make sure it'll work properly

Then use 'xwmconfig' to make sure it'll boot into Gnome
First of all, thank you everyone for your helpful replies. The two things above are what I am still confused about? How do it edit those files from the shell?

For example, in Fedora I would've done something like kate /etc/whatever.conf

Do I need to install the NVIDIA driver first, or could I wait until I get into Gnome? Thanks so much for all your continuing advice.
 
Old 06-29-2004, 08:59 AM   #8
oneandoneis2
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They're not files you edit - they're commands you run that do the editing for you. Just type 'xf86config' and hit Enter - it'll take you to an interactive text-based program.

Answer it as best you can. If you don't know, go with the defaults.

Same with the 'xwmconfig' command - it'll give you a menu of all installed window managers, and ask you to select one.

You CAN do it by hand - say, by editing .xinitrc to have the line "gnome-session" in it. But it's more work that way
 
Old 06-29-2004, 09:03 AM   #9
oneandoneis2
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Oh, and it's already got NVIDIA support built in. You only need to install the drivers if you need 3d-acceleration, I believe. So go ahead and do it from Gnome, if that's what you're familiar with.
 
Old 06-29-2004, 10:04 AM   #10
TiCkO
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hello.

I think that slackware is not really hard distro. And i just love it. Try it out, and then you will see, but you must know that slackware is not wizard based distribution, and that anything you will do , is the best way to do it in shell.

Your problem:

when you are installing slackware you must configure lilo, then reboot system and than yust login to your shell. type root, and password, then is reconomed to adduser. the X server you can start vith command: startx , and then enyoj in the best linux distro ever
 
Old 06-29-2004, 12:49 PM   #11
shilo
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wasabi-

There are lots of ways to edit a file. When I'm using the command prompt, I like to use vi. To use vi to edit a file, type:
Code:
vi filename
This will open up your file in the vi editor. Now vi isn't instinctive to use for a first timer. WHat I recommend you do before using vi to edit files is, from the command prompt, type:

Code:
vimtutor
This will open up vi (actually vim, but don't let that bother you) in a special training mode that will teach you how to use vi (vim). Follow along and you'll be editing files with vi in no time.
 
Old 06-29-2004, 01:15 PM   #12
Nis
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vi(m) is great, but for someone just learning the CLI I suggest pico or mcedit. I love and use vim all the time (it's my prefered editor), but for just getting started it might be a little overwhelming. pico is nice and easy, and mcedit used the function keys for commands.
 
Old 06-29-2004, 01:56 PM   #13
wasabi
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I just wanted to say thankyou to everyone who has posted in this thread. I look forward to being a helpful member of the community sometime in the not too distant future. I will try all this when I get off work tonight.

Thanks again

Josh
 
Old 06-29-2004, 03:56 PM   #14
Crashbox
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josh,

i think we all have been there at one point: the install is done and you are left staring at a black screen with a cursor, and while you are aware of some (or all) of the capabilities of the machine, you are completely unaware of how to access them. Some of us are even lucky enough to have had this experience with DOS and *nix.

what i am here to say is: config your system however you feel comforable (Gnome in your case) but once it's done, take some time to learn the CLI. i can't stress enough how important that is. the first time you inadvertently break X and need to fix it, you'll be glad you did. plus, and i think most people on this board would agree, while some tasks are easier with a GUI, many, many more are faster/easier at the CLI.

so good luck and hang in there.

-crash
 
Old 06-29-2004, 07:40 PM   #15
wasabi
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!?!?!?

I am going to get through this but.....

any of these commands when I type say

bash command not found

I am logged in as root and once again to say the least stumped
 
  


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