LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 03-11-2018, 09:14 PM   #1
altheguy
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2018
Distribution: Arch Linux
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Slackware as a possible experiment daily-driver


I had looked at Slackware very briefly. as it was easy to install, and yet it is supposed to be a somewhat small distribution (if you don't just install all the packages). I might consider trying to see how Slackware could work for my needs. Does slack-pkg just install source or Slackware specific binaries? How are the Slackware software mirrors compared to something like Arch or Debian? Do you need to scour GitHub to get updated software for Slackware?
 
Old 03-11-2018, 09:29 PM   #2
Skaendo
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2014
Location: West Texas, USA
Distribution: Slackware64-14.2
Posts: 796

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
slackpkg only updates packages for the Slackware installation. For other packages you would look to slackbuilds.org (SBo) and compile them yourself or one of the third party repos that have prebuilt packages. As for keeping the packages you get from SBo updated, it is your responsibility to keep up with the changelog an update as necessary. There are some 3rd party tools available to somewhat automate updates and there are some that will access and update from 3rd party repos as well, but they don't automatically update, you again need to check and run them as necessary.

Slackware mirrors only mirror Slackware. ie; packages in the ISO and updates for them.
 
Old 03-11-2018, 09:33 PM   #3
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mageia, and whatever VMs I happen to be playing with
Posts: 14,276
Blog Entries: 24

Rep: Reputation: 3896Reputation: 3896Reputation: 3896Reputation: 3896Reputation: 3896Reputation: 3896Reputation: 3896Reputation: 3896Reputation: 3896Reputation: 3896Reputation: 3896
Slackware's default repos include only software included in Slackware. Unlike most distros' primary repos, Slackware does not offer by default third-party packages.

Most Slackware users get additional software from Slackbuilds or from AlienBob's repos. Back when I first started with Slackware, there were a few websites with Slackware *.tgz packages available for download, but I think most of them have faded away in deference to Slackbuilds.

I normally use pkgtool to install the compiled package, because I learned it first.

A Slackbuild is compiled from sources. The Slackbuild page will point you to a Slackbuild build script and to software sources for the program in question. The Slackbuild script compiles an installable package that you can then install. Here's the HOWTO that explains how Slackbuilds works: http://slackbuilds.org/howto/

THere is also included in Slackware an rpm2tgz script for converting an RPM to a Slackware compatible package; I've used it two or three times and it has worked flawlessly for me.

The other option is to install from sources. In recent years, I've had to do that only a very few times.

Slackware gives you much more granular control of software than other distros, save LFS or Gentoo; the price of that is to be willing to exercise that control. Me, I have wandered back and forth over the geography of distros, but home is always Slackware.

Last edited by frankbell; 03-11-2018 at 09:43 PM. Reason: accuracy
 
Old 03-11-2018, 09:36 PM   #4
Ztcoracat
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Distribution: Slackware, MX 17
Posts: 9,005
Blog Entries: 14

Rep: Reputation: 1107Reputation: 1107Reputation: 1107Reputation: 1107Reputation: 1107Reputation: 1107Reputation: 1107Reputation: 1107Reputation: 1107
Quote:
Do you need to scour GitHub to get updated software for Slackware?
No-

To upgrade all of your pkg's on Slackware you would run:
Code:
slackpkg upgrade-all
If you can't find what your looking for in SBo or the SlackBuilds repo you can try Alien Bob's pkgs.
http://www.slackware.com/~alien/slackbuilds/

-::-When editing your mirrors list, only choose one mirror when you set up your Slackware system.-::-
 
Old 03-11-2018, 09:39 PM   #5
ChuangTzu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2015
Location: Where ever needed
Distribution: Slackware/Salix, Devuan, FreeBSD
Posts: 1,085

Rep: Reputation: 855Reputation: 855Reputation: 855Reputation: 855Reputation: 855Reputation: 855Reputation: 855
Be warned it might just become the best experiment you've undertaken.

https://docs.slackware.com/slackware:beginners_guide
https://docs.slackware.com/howtos:sl...:systemupgrade
https://docs.slackware.com/slackware:faq
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-11-2018, 09:40 PM   #6
bassmadrigal
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: West Jordan, UT, USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 5,530

Rep: Reputation: 3278Reputation: 3278Reputation: 3278Reputation: 3278Reputation: 3278Reputation: 3278Reputation: 3278Reputation: 3278Reputation: 3278Reputation: 3278Reputation: 3278
Slackware is designed to be installed using a full install. That can take around 10GB of space. You can trim things out, but without dependency resolution, it might be tricky to find out what you can remove without breaking anything. However, even if something is installed, it won't be used or ran unless you start it. So unused software will only take up some harddrive space.

Slackware is a binary-based distribution, so you will install binaries from the installation media. However, because it is opensource, all source, including the build scripts are available. slackpkg is only used to sync your computer with the mirror, so it would get any patches that are released for Slackware packages. It does not do any compiling, so it won't touch the source.

Slackware doesn't have any additional official repositories beyond what is included in the installation media. However, there are 3rd-party projects that do provide additional software. One of the largest is https://slackbuilds.org (commonly called SBo). This is similar to Arch's AUR, where users are able to submit their own SlackBuilds, which can be run to generate Slackware packages. Most of them will compile the software, however, there are a few that repackage binaries from the developers. I think there's around 7000 scripts available right now. So, it isn't as large as some distros, but it still contains a lot.

Patrick Volkerding, the creator and BDFL (Benevolent Dictator for Life) of Slackware, puts out patches for stable versions of Slackware when serious security fixes are available. He doesn't provide patches for everything, because he needs to balance stability with security. If you're constantly upgrading packages every time a security update is released, it could lead to instability within the OS. So the patches that are put out tend to be for serious security issues. Slackware also has a development version called -current. In here, Pat will continually update the system until he feels it is ready to be considered the next stable release. Once the next stable is released, a new development cycle of -current will begin heading towards the next stable release. While it can be unstable, Pat is usually pretty good at putting out solid updates that many users run -current all the time (he does have a pretty solid team behind him that help prepare updates for him to review).

If you want to update packages beyond what Pat puts out, then yes, you probably would need to scour those project pages. The stable releases are certainly not bleeding edge. -current can be bleeding edge and is kinda almost a rolling release, but since it will eventually culminate in a stable release and then restart, it doesn't fully classify as a rolling release. Also, the closer to a stable release, the less likely Pat will push new updates to programs since they could introduce instability.

But Slackware is a great system. I've been using it for over 15 years and I wouldn't have it any other way
 
Old 03-11-2018, 10:28 PM   #7
Daedra
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Springfield, MO
Distribution: Slackware64-14.2
Posts: 1,542

Rep: Reputation: 376Reputation: 376Reputation: 376Reputation: 376
+1 to what everyone else said. If you want a visual explanation then check out these videos, they do a good job of explaining updating slackware packages and adding 3rd party packages.

# updating official Slackware packages.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAT5kK-byjU

# Adding 3rd party packages from www.slackbuilds.org using sbopkg.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akMZS2dcqPo
 
Old 03-11-2018, 10:36 PM   #8
enorbet
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware = Main OpSys for decades while testing others to keep up
Posts: 2,019

Rep: Reputation: 1915Reputation: 1915Reputation: 1915Reputation: 1915Reputation: 1915Reputation: 1915Reputation: 1915Reputation: 1915Reputation: 1915Reputation: 1915Reputation: 1915
Obviously the best way to find out if the water is warm is to jump right in but it is also good to ask oneself "What do I want from an operating system?" and a corollary to that question is "Just how up-to-date do i need to be?".

I've met software devs that swore they required up-to-the-minute software to be competitive at work so while I don't really understand that view, if that fits you, like them you may prefer something like a rolling release, like Arch which you mentioned.

You also mentioned Debian and that is something of an odd case. Debian Stable is generally not as up-to-date as Slackware Full Release and Debian Stretch is not as up-to-date as Slackware Current and neither one of them handles source with anywhere even remotely approaching the ease and facility of Slackware.

Of those two I like Debian better than Arch and I have both of them in their latest form on this box but both of them apparently require rather constant maintenance to avoid getting so far behind that a major update wrecks everything. Personally I think that is a complete waste of time especially just for convenience of auto dependency resolution. Also I find myself wanting to install something relatively commonplace and having to deal with lots of time consuming dependencies (sometimes oddball removals of packages I want to keep) that are already solved in Full Install Slackware but then maybe I'm spoiled by having used Slackware as my Main for almost 20 years now.

If you want a system that reveres simple stability and only requires setup time to achieve personalizing things to suit your style and/or needs and extremely little maintenance work thereafter then I think you will love Slackware. However if you attempt to turn it into Arch or Debian (sans systemd) you may never experience what it has to offer that's truly special and rewarding and it is unlikely Slackware can do a better job of being Debian or Arch than those already are. Take some time and read the docs and keep coming back here and learn the Slackware Philosophy to see if it agrees with you. Frankly as much as I hop around to keep current, nothing even comes close. It's the oldest surviving distro trunk with lots of branches for good reason.
 
Old 03-12-2018, 06:11 AM   #9
Lysander666
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2017
Location: London
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 + Xfce
Posts: 915
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 796Reputation: 796Reputation: 796Reputation: 796Reputation: 796Reputation: 796Reputation: 796
I run Debian and Slackware and there is quite a bit of difference between the two. Debian stable is subjectively a lot easier to maintain - apt update/upgrade is all that one needs to do after setup. It's extremely easy.

There are three ways to obtain/maintain packages in Slackware.

1.slackpkg update then upgrade-all updates all the main packages and is easy to run.

2. You will inevitably end up needing third party packages which are not included in the main install, and you can build these from SlackBuilds.org. Once you have the hang of how to do it it's an easy process and you won't have to think twice about it.

However, there are no automated dependencies so sometimes you may have to build a few in order to get your main required third party package to run. Some of these depends can be quite meaty, e.g. openjdk, and can take hours to compile. In such a case it is recommended to just download and install a pre-compiled version - normally these come from Alien Bob's repo, or maybe ponce.

3....this can also be the case for main packages too, e.g. Libreoffice - I would never compile this since it would take way too long to do so on my system. I always install a pre-compiled binary.

Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post

Of those two I like Debian better than Arch and I have both of them in their latest form on this box but both of them apparently require rather constant maintenance to avoid getting so far behind that a major update wrecks everything. Personally I think that is a complete waste of time especially just for convenience of auto dependency resolution. Also I find myself wanting to install something relatively commonplace and having to deal with lots of time consuming dependencies (sometimes oddball removals of packages I want to keep) that are already solved in Full Install Slackware but then maybe I'm spoiled by having used Slackware as my Main for almost 20 years now.
I wonder if you are somewhat conflating Debian with Arch, the two are very different, or certainly Debian stable is in comparison to Arch. Debian stable is extremely low maintenance and just requires apt update/upgrade to update all packages, even for a point release upgrade. I have never had anything break in Debian.

Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
If you want a system that reveres simple stability and only requires setup time to achieve personalizing things to suit your style and/or needs and extremely little maintenance work thereafter then I think you will love Slackware.
This is the only thing that puzzles me so far as a relative Slack newbie. Updating Slackbuilds has broken other packages [e.g. libass breaking qmplay2] so in this case, updating 3rd party packages may take a little time since some may need to be recompiled. Also, how does one keep track of these dependencies, I don't know. For instance, it was only because I had recently updated libass that I could guess that that was the cause of the qmplay2 breakage, at first I didn't know what was going on. I have therefore had to create a spreadsheet of dependencies for when I next update my Slackbuilds. On the other hand, I don't know if I need to update these SBo packages if they are working fine for me. The way I currently see it, I update the main packages whenever they are available and third party whenever I have the time, be that weeks apart or longer.

Last edited by Lysander666; 03-12-2018 at 06:18 AM.
 
Old 03-12-2018, 09:28 AM   #10
montagdude
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2016
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 1,293

Rep: Reputation: 982Reputation: 982Reputation: 982Reputation: 982Reputation: 982Reputation: 982Reputation: 982Reputation: 982
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lysander666 View Post
This is the only thing that puzzles me so far as a relative Slack newbie. Updating Slackbuilds has broken other packages [e.g. libass breaking qmplay2] so in this case, updating 3rd party packages may take a little time since some may need to be recompiled. Also, how does one keep track of these dependencies, I don't know. For instance, it was only because I had recently updated libass that I could guess that that was the cause of the qmplay2 breakage, at first I didn't know what was going on. I have therefore had to create a spreadsheet of dependencies for when I next update my Slackbuilds. On the other hand, I don't know if I need to update these SBo packages if they are working fine for me. The way I currently see it, I update the main packages whenever they are available and third party whenever I have the time, be that weeks apart or longer.
This question has come up a couple of times. From what I know, slackrepo and sboui will track "inverse dependencies" and give the option to rebuild them when a dependency is updated. There may be other tools that do the same thing.

Just as a quick explanation of these tools:
  • slackrepo: a very powerful tool for creating and maintaining repos of packages from SlackBuilds.org and other sources. I haven't used this, so I can't speak too much to its abilities, but there are several here that use it exclusively.
  • sboui: an add-on to sbopkg and sbotools that provides fast browsing, tagging/batch operations, maintaining blacklists and build options, and some other features like finding inverse dependencies (for SBo only). It can also be used without sbopkg or sbotools if desired.
I should also add that sbopkg and sbotools can at least replace your spreadsheet of dependencies. In your case, when qmplay2 broke, you could have used sqg (sbopkg's dependencies tool) or sbotools to list the dependencies, and then realize that you updated libass recently. Personally, I use sboui and pretty much always rebuild inverse dependencies, unless I know that it is not required for a certain case.

Last edited by montagdude; 03-12-2018 at 09:40 AM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2018, 11:18 AM   #11
GazL
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Posts: 4,797
Blog Entries: 14

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lysander666 View Post
Also, how does one keep track of these dependencies, I don't know. For instance, it was only because I had recently updated libass that I could guess that that was the cause of the qmplay2 breakage, at first I didn't know what was going on. I have therefore had to create a spreadsheet of dependencies for when I next update my Slackbuilds.

The way I do it is I use symlinks.

Here's the directory listing of my mpv build for example:
Code:
build@magrathea:~/builds/mpv-0.27$ ls -l
total 3008
drwxr-xr-x 2 build build    4096 Feb 13 11:19 other-versions
-rwxr-xr-x 1 build build    3444 Feb 13 11:21 build_mpv
lrwxrwxrwx 1 build build      11 Jan 23 18:29 docutils -> ../docutils
-rwxr-xr-x 1 build build     406 Jun 26  2016 doinst.sh
lrwxrwxrwx 1 build build       9 Jan 23 18:29 ffmpeg -> ../ffmpeg
lrwxrwxrwx 1 build build       9 Jan 23 18:29 libass -> ../libass
-rw-r--r-- 1 build build 2957202 Feb 13 11:19 mpv-0.27.1.tar.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 build build     680 Jun 26  2016 slack-desc
-rw-r--r-- 1 build build    3083 Feb 13 11:18 vaapi-Use-libva2-message-callbacks.patch
-rwxr--r-- 1 build build  100685 Nov 16 15:12 waf
The links remind me that it depends on ffmpeg, libass and docutils and also provide me with a nice link to use with pushd/popd/cd when navigating.

Now, if I update libass for example, I can find what depends on it (and therefore might potentially need rebuilding) with a simple find:
Code:
build@magrathea:~/builds$ find . -type l -lname "*/libass"
./mpv-0.28/libass
./mpv-0.27/libass
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2018, 03:38 PM   #12
mralk3
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2015
Location: Utah, USA
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 || Slackware-current && CentOS
Posts: 1,322

Rep: Reputation: 697Reputation: 697Reputation: 697Reputation: 697Reputation: 697Reputation: 697
Quote:
Originally Posted by altheguy View Post
I had looked at Slackware very briefly. as it was easy to install, and yet it is supposed to be a somewhat small distribution (if you don't just install all the packages). I might consider trying to see how Slackware could work for my needs. Does slack-pkg just install source or Slackware specific binaries? How are the Slackware software mirrors compared to something like Arch or Debian? Do you need to scour GitHub to get updated software for Slackware?
You shouldn't be comparing Arch to Debian or Slackware stable. Arch is a rolling release distribution, which means all the software is bleeding edge. In Arch, things break often, and you really need to understand how Arch works to fix them. With Arch Linux, you learn Arch Linux. The same goes for Debian because your system is managed by the package manager. With Slackware you learn about Linux as a whole because you have much more granular control over your system.

Debian and Slackware are point release distributions so they are a bit more comparable. As a 16 year Debian veteran, and a 3 year Slackware user, I wish I had began my Linux journey with Slackware. Yes, Debian has a lot more binary packages available in its software repositories, but Slackware provides a better base system to extend with your own customization. Furthermore, almost anything you would miss in vanilla Slackware that is available in Debian repositories can be found on SlackBuilds.org.

Over the years I've seen some very nasty breakage with Debian (but not recently). Due to how Slackware is developed, I doubt such breakage would ever have leaked into a Slackware stable release. All major bugs are ironed out in Slackware-current (the development branch of Slackware), which leaves few minor bugs to be squashed during the Slackware beta releases. Due to how system updates are delivered, Slackware stable gets any unforeseen bugs or security flaws patched much more quickly than Debian.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2018, 04:26 PM   #13
upnort
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2014
Distribution: Slackware, Proxmox, Debian, CentOS, Ubuntu MATE
Posts: 773

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Others have answered your original three questions. I'll throw in my two cents with related thoughts.

I use Slackware at home. I am content with running Slackware on those systems. I use Slackware like any other operating system. I use MATE as my desktop, I use many of the common and popular apps. I am fully productive with how I want to use computers.

I have used Slackware since about 2002. Initially I struggled with Slackware because there is little hand holding. I grew to appreciate that approach because nobody upstream is presuming how I want to configure my computers. That means more sweat equity on my part but I never have liked upstream presumptions about configuring an operating system. Always when I use any other distro I end up ripping loads of overhead.

Slackware lacks a large repository of packages. For a single home user that might not be a significant concern, but that was one of the issues raised in a discussion some time ago about using Slackware in business. While slackbuilds.org fills a lot of the package void, there is sweat equity required to maintain the additional packages.

As much as I like Slackware for myself, I do not use Slackware at work. At work I use Debian (Proxmox), CentOS, and Ubuntu. No complaints there. Lots of fun. Business often is very much "time is money" and the package management systems on the distros I use at work are a better fit for "time is money." I also accept that should I disappear tomorrow that others have to fill my absence to maintain those systems and they need mainstream tools.

Another topic discussed in the Slackware in business thread is slackbuilds.org. I speak only for myself, but I wish there were two branches. One branch for long term support (LTS) where packages are updated only for security and bug patches and the other branch for those who want the latest version. QA with slackbuilds.org is high and admirable, but there is no policy about when packages are updated. Each maintainer has his or her own approach.

There is no GUI wrapper to slackpkg. There is another popular package management tool called slapt-get that has a GTK GUI called gslapt. If a GUI is important then using gslapt is a decent choice. Look at the Salix distro for an example.

A contentious topic is whether the Slackware package management system should support dependencies. Surf the forum for heated discussions about the topic. If dependencies are important then again, look at Salix. Those folks have good dependency checking with respect to installing packages.

Conversely, Slackware is designed to not remove packages when the user wants to remove a single package. The package management tools check that duplicate files are not removed and that is all. To me, this is one of the flaws of package management systems on all other distros. Ideally package management tools should pull in necessary dependencies but should ignore those dependencies when removing a single package.

If I had to support other people outside of work, such as family members, I would use Ubuntu MATE. Slackware requires too much sweat equity for non technical users.

Should Slackware tickle your fancy, you should find that Slackware is stable. Very stable. I can count on one hand through the years when a package update broke something -- and the cause was upstream and not with Slackware.

For myself I don't see Slackware disappearing from my daily use. Quite content. Have fun tinkering.
 
4 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2018, 05:07 PM   #14
Didier Spaier
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Location: Paris, France
Distribution: Slint64-14.2.1 on Lenovo Thinkpad W520
Posts: 8,631

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnort View Post
Another topic discussed in the Slackware in business thread is slackbuilds.org. I speak only for myself, but I wish there were two branches. One branch for long term support (LTS) where packages are updated only for security and bug patches and the other branch for those who want the latest version. QA with slackbuilds.org is high and admirable, but there is no policy about when packages are updated. Each maintainer has his or her own approach.
I agree on that. I'll add that for this reason George Vlahavas provides the "extra" repo, cf. http://salixos.blogspot.fr/

Ideally we would have an (LTS) SBo branch with an associated "extra" packages repository, with the REQUIRE field of PACKAGES.TXT listing all dependencies. This way Slackware would have a way larger repository, like an AUR so to speak. Did someone say "dream on Didier"?

Quote:
There is no GUI wrapper to slackpkg. There is another popular package management tool called slapt-get that has a GTK GUI called gslapt. If a GUI is important then using gslapt is a decent choice. Look at the Salix distro for an example.

A contentious topic is whether the Slackware package management system should support dependencies. Surf the forum for heated discussions about the topic. If dependencies are important then again, look at Salix. Those folks have good dependency checking with respect to installing packages.
I can't but agree as I use the same tools and methods in Slint

Quote:
Conversely, Slackware is designed to not remove packages when the user wants to remove a single package. The package management tools check that duplicate files are not removed and that is all. To me, this is one of the flaws of package management systems on all other distros. Ideally package management tools should pull in necessary dependencies but should ignore those dependencies when removing a single package.
I also agree, and making a proposal to change that in slat-get is in my TODO list. But maybe it's just a matter of properly using the --no-dep option. Tentatively maybe a wrapper script could help.

Last edited by Didier Spaier; 03-12-2018 at 05:15 PM.
 
Old 03-12-2018, 05:58 PM   #15
hitest
Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 5,613

Rep: Reputation: 1671Reputation: 1671Reputation: 1671Reputation: 1671Reputation: 1671Reputation: 1671Reputation: 1671Reputation: 1671Reputation: 1671Reputation: 1671Reputation: 1671
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
Me, I have wandered back and forth over the geography of distros, but home is always Slackware.
Yup. Slackware is my primary distribution; I've been slacking since 2004.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Scripts in cron.daily are not running daily abefroman Linux - Server 1 12-23-2014 01:11 PM
[SOLVED] slackware 14.1, fail2ban 0.9.1, daily segfault af7567 Slackware 2 12-15-2014 03:52 PM
Slackware hangup daily cocoon Slackware 3 02-16-2008 10:57 PM
Advice? Best way to move files daily to a daily "date" named directory ziphem Linux - Newbie 2 04-15-2007 09:03 AM
USB experiment board driver. Reverse engineer? TheBrick Programming 1 08-23-2006 09:18 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:23 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration