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jmdlcar 06-05-2005 08:08 PM

Slackware 11.0
 
Has anyone heard when Slackware 11.0 will be release?

juanbobo 06-05-2005 08:21 PM

I don't know if anyone knows, but the releases come out every 6-8 months I think and the last (10.1) came out in February. I would imagine it will be out before the summer is over.

bird603568 06-05-2005 10:43 PM

If you make an iso out of the most recent /current (I think it was updated around the end of May), when installing it says slackware 11.0

Shade 06-05-2005 11:23 PM

I guess that means soon, then.

But in all honesty, noone knows but Pat himself. He'll freeze current and call it 11.0 when he thinks it's ready.

--Shade

GlowGlow 06-06-2005 04:10 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Shade
I guess that means soon, then.
Not necessarily, in the past the version number has been bumped pretty early too.

Quote:

But in all honesty, noone knows but Pat himself. He'll freeze current and call it 11.0 when he thinks it's ready.
Yep. He once said that 11.0 is likely to have kernel 2.6 as a part of the default install, so we will probably see some big changes and time to test them.

michaelsanford 06-06-2005 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Shade
But in all honesty, noone knows but Pat himself. He'll freeze current and call it 11.0 when he thinks it's ready.

--Shade

Honestly I'm not holding my breath; Pat's pretty sick and I'm not convinced that even he knows when it'll come out.

cavalier 06-06-2005 11:09 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by michaelsanford
Honestly I'm not holding my breath; Pat's pretty sick and I'm not convinced that even he knows when it'll come out.
And, hell, it's not like he has to hurry. Even if we have to wait until next summer, it'll still be a faster release cycle than Debian. :)

bird603568 06-06-2005 11:31 PM

If/when Pat dies(which I hope isnt soon), whats gonna happen to slack? Is it gonna die out? 1 person take over or unleash it to the the people? an I really hope 2.6 is the default for 11 (its not for the /current 11 beta)

jmdlcar 06-06-2005 11:36 PM

I wish he (Pat V.) would put gnome back in Slackware 11 or current. I had no luck after he drop gnome and with any of the other's version.

juanbobo 06-07-2005 12:12 AM

What is the minimum needed to run Gnome (not just GTK) progs?

xushi 06-07-2005 03:31 AM

Although bird603568 didn't put the question in a good way at all, but i also would like to know,

If Pat 'retires', or stops work on slackware for helth reasons or other. What would be the future of Slack ?

Coz i don't see myself switching to any other distro.. Its either Slack or streight to Solaris/Mac for me =)

gbonvehi 06-07-2005 03:42 AM

He stated when he was ill in a mail he wrote, that he already made arrangements with some Slackware people that have helped him to continue with it if something wrongs happens (Hope not).

bird603568 06-07-2005 08:26 AM

Sorry some times im bad with words. I guess thats why i dont have a girlfriend now.

davidsrsb 06-07-2005 10:26 AM

The beauty of open source, Pat only really controls the Slackware name as the software is almost clean of the proprietary installers that Suse and the rpm distros love. So if necessary there is nothing to stop a fork.

davidsrsb 06-07-2005 10:30 AM

Notice Pats comments about alsa 1.09a in the changelog. Sticking with 2.4.x kernel is going to become awkward towards the end of this year as more and more package developers (using other distros) start to assume the use of the 2.6 kernel.

geeman2.0 06-07-2005 10:52 AM

I'm confident that there are enough dedicated slackers out there to pick up the slack, so to speak, if Pat retires. Even if there isn't an official release there will be a fork.

There's no way the linux community would let the greatest distribution ever die out :)

cavalier 06-07-2005 03:28 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by geeman2.0
I'm confident that there are enough dedicated slackers out there to pick up the slack, so to speak, if Pat retires. Even if there isn't an official release there will be a fork.

There's no way the linux community would let the greatest distribution ever die out :)

While I agree, I do wonder if it could ever be as good as it is now, under the control of one or more 'fans' that take over when he retires. IMHO, it's primarily his iron will that keeps Slack from becoming bloatware.

samael26 06-07-2005 03:37 PM

Funny to see that the 2 best (IMO) Linux distros are either a one-man endeavour (Slackware) or

a 1000+ dedicated-developpers one (Debian). Seems like Linux is comfortable with extremes...

MikeZila 06-07-2005 10:28 PM

What do version numbers even matter?

As soon as you get ahold of 11.0, you'll be wondering where 11.1, or 12.0 is. If you're really into the Slackware thing, you would already be using packages out of /current, and that negates version numbers altogether.

d00msweek 06-08-2005 12:53 AM

hey.. i was chatting on #linux@undernet

when..

--
<maruko> apt-get is a program. right? i cant see it on my system. im using slackware
<OldMonk> maruko: then you're beyond anyone's help.
<mike_> bahahahaha
* OldMonk shakes his head sadly.
* synapsis laughs.
maruko> sorry.
<OldMonk> maruko: don't say sorry -- use a Real Distribution.
<maruko> like?
<OldMonk> well, i use debian, but i hear there are a couple of thers too.
<Steakk> man, i am friggen tired as hell
<OldMonk> others even
<maruko> what's wrong with slackware?
<OldMonk> maruko: no package management, dependent on one person who's about to die, no security updates, should i go on?
<Steakk> OM: It sucks.
* OldMonk needs to get out of delhi.
<OldMonk> Steakk: that she do
<maruko> yeah
<maruko> poor pat
<maruko> waa
<viking667> it's a lot harder to ensure programs fit together...
<viking667> does he STILL have that medical problem?
<OldMonk> viking667: yeah, he's going to die.
<OldMonk> of course, we're ALL going to die, but that's not the point :)
--

cavalier 06-08-2005 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by d00msweek
hey.. i was chatting on #linux@undernet

when..
<snip>

And you didn't pipe up? That conversation was both rife with errors and tacky as hell...

MikeZila 06-08-2005 11:59 AM

Seriously. I wouldn't have been able to hold it in.

d00msweek 06-09-2005 01:12 AM

I was busy chatting with my friends at another channel. hehe ;)

erraticassassin 06-09-2005 03:01 AM

My worry is that if official development of Slackware stops for whatever reason, it won't be replaced by a single community driven effort but by a whole bunch of splinter groups, each of which will claim that it is the One True Slack. Another holy war which nobody will win.

Oh, and discussing when someone is going to die? Classy. Very Classy. </sarcasm>

rkrishna 06-10-2005 04:32 AM

pat's biodata, we r eager to know that
 
here is the link to wiki
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Volkerding

This biographical article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it


i hope one who knows pat could give a full detailed information about him.
how his health is how old he is ????????????
we all are eager to know about him really

every one will die so live tht but nobody must leave comment on this
it is not good

davidsrsb 06-14-2005 02:41 AM

Now that KDE 3.4.1 is in current, "current" is starting to feel like it's reaching a stable point again.

trigggl 06-14-2005 07:25 AM

She served me well
 
To me, it feels like Slackware is already dying. The decision to get rid of Gnome seems like a bad one. As slow as Debian is, it has a viable 2.6 kernel option not to mention you'll have a hard time finding a program that's NOT available. I've been living off of Slackware for the past year, but I'm tired of fighting with it to get basics working. KDE, as far as I can tell, is crippled without Gnome. I've finally given up on KDE and am now switching over to Sarge with Gnome. I'm a Gnome newby, but everything is working and my nVidia driver actually installed properly without me having to make concessions in the boot loader. The sound works, the scroll on the mouse works, everything works and I don't have to re-administer my cdrom every time I want to use it.

The real reason why I'm switching? I can actually record from the sound card 'line in'. You see, I'm looking to convert church tapes and other important things to mp3 to conserve space and to back up important audio. What good is a stable distro if it doesn't help you back up what I need backed up.

Slackware has served me well. It was a great learning experience, but now it's time to actually get something done. It did play DVD's really well.

justwantin 07-13-2005 04:34 AM

triggl

I find a couple of your comments rather curious.

What's wrong with the 2.6 kernels in ../current/extras? I have never had any problems with them except for compiling in some extra modules for dvb cards that weren't even in the kernel source from kernel.org yet.

How could taking out Gnome cripple KDE? I haven't installed Gnome since installing slack-10.0 and I have never had a problem with KDE. The odd gnome/gtk'ish package I compile and install or download from linuxpackages always seems to work anyway even though I'm using a KDE desktop.

I've never had to put anything in lilo.conf in order to run a nvidia card either. Can't say anything about what you want to do with sound but I seem to be able to do that with streamed music and digital tv.

Maybe your hardware's different than mine.

I suppose its just serendipidy that I've hobble together several boxes here with mostly salvage cards and and drives on top of anyold gigabyte mobo with processor that's cheap
and slackware always seems to work time after time. Just work.

Any slack release is just a stable snapshot at that moment in time usually within 4 weeks my systems are evolving into something higher, sometimes with current sometimes without. It's just a solid base that you can leave alone or expand/change to suit your needs.

Nothing wrong with debian though. Just seems that for me I decided about 2 1/2 years ago that distro hoping didn't give me anything more than sticking with just one and sorting out what my problems were. It just turned out the ride stopped at slackware. I'm kind of grateful for that.

trigggl 07-13-2005 05:56 AM

Hardware-Rambus
 
You are correct, we have different hardware. Any time I wanted to do something with Slackware, I would drive my wife and myself crazy. One of the most important things to me is getting the nvidia driver working. I didn't have to add anything to my lilo. I had to remove some things. I had to use standard text (say goodbye to the penguin) or TTY1 would be a garbled and unreadable mess. That would be when I finally find the exact one that would actually compile for me. I sure am tired of clicking 'yes' for compile anyways even though I have the RivaTNT module as part of my kernel.

Don't get me wrong, I still have my 10.1 install and still love to use it once in a while. I love how the rc files are set up and how they seem to be well documented. I know Slackware a lot better than I know Debian at this point. I did get digikam working in Slackware and haven't gotten a camera program working in Debian yet. I'm having the same permission problem on my large FAT partition in both. I need to learn more about mounting drives. What good is a media drive that you need to be root to access.

My Slackware install never worked right with the 2.6 kernel in testing. You have to remember to use all the other programs in testing that have been compiled with it, but there doesn't seem to be a complete set. It's not as stable as just using the standard 2.4.29 on my machine anyway. I do have an oddball machine and it has been suggested to me that I need more cooling. I tried LFS and my compiles started going bad. I think my hardware may have some issues.

Perhaps there's something about Linux not being fully prepared for Rambus on a PIII with differing values in each of the two slots. I have a 1 Gig processor with an adapter in a slot 1.

I'm just saying that Slackware is the most temperamental distro in my machine so far and Debian just works. I am running with my Slackware settings in most programs. If I was more versed in using groups, I would probably had fewer problems in Slackware. I've been using Linux for about 2 years, but I'm still a relative :newbie: on some things.

Namaseit 07-13-2005 10:26 AM

Wow you must have some pretty weird hardware. The 2.6 kernel in slack isn't going to be any different then a 2.6 kernel in debian. maybe a few different options but its pretty much the same. Also the apps don't have anything to do with the kernel. They aren't compiled against it. I'm not sure what you mean about this. I've been using a 2.6 kernel with slackware for a long time without much problems. 2.6.11 sure was a lemon though. Hardly slackware's fault. I just kept using 2.6.10 which ran like a champ. Until I bought my WD SATA HDD last week I didn't even want to upgrade from 2.6.10. As for the nvidia driver that is very strange. As for no vesafb at startup It's something you see for 20-30 seconds and either have KDM or GDM or XDM load up or just login and startx on your way.

But hey, whatever works for you is fine. If slackware isn't for then its your choice. Who cares what distro people use anyways. It's whatever you're more comfortable with is all.

trigggl 07-13-2005 10:58 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Namaseit
Wow you must have some pretty weird hardware. The 2.6 kernel in slack isn't going to be any different then a 2.6 kernel in debian. maybe a few different options but its pretty much the same. Also the apps don't have anything to do with the kernel. They aren't compiled against it. I'm not sure what you mean about this. I've been using a 2.6 kernel with slackware for a long time without much problems. 2.6.11 sure was a lemon though. Hardly slackware's fault. I just kept using 2.6.10 which ran like a champ. Until I bought my WD SATA HDD last week I didn't even want to upgrade from 2.6.10. As for the nvidia driver that is very strange. As for no vesafb at startup It's something you see for 20-30 seconds and either have KDM or GDM or XDM load up or just login and startx on your way.

But hey, whatever works for you is fine. If slackware isn't for then its your choice. Who cares what distro people use anyways. It's whatever you're more comfortable with is all.

There was an Alsa package that went with the kernel as well as a couple of other things. The nvidia driver needs to compile off of kernel headers. The problem of vesafb wasn't at startup! The problem didn't happen till the nvidia driver loaded. Now try to switch to runlevel 3 to repair your failed nvidia driver install when all you can see is a garbled mess.

The nvidia driver problem is not strange. It's well documented on the nVidia Forum.

By the way, who said I was dumping Slackware? I just don't agree with some of the decisions and how they affect my computer. I'm not telling anyone it works for to drop it. I still like it. I still use it for downloading pictures off of my camera, the one thing I don't have working in Debian yet. I still keep it updated and post the updates in another linux forum.

justwantin 07-13-2005 02:26 PM

"I sure am tired of clicking 'yes' for compile anyways even though I have the RivaTNT module as part of my kernel."

AFAIK the only nvidia driver that comes with slack is the generic nvidia driver "nv". If I want full features I have to compile drivers against kernel with script from the nvidia site. if I change kernels or use more than one kernel then I need a different (compiled) "nvidia" driver for each kernel. My video cards are secondhand (>= 3 yr old) but the most recent nvidia script "7174" works. It compiles for them as well as the newest nvidia cards.

"What good is a media drive that you need to be root to access."

Try changing your /etc/fstab to this?
/dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom iso9660 noauto,users,ro 0 0
It works.

"You have to remember to use all the other programs in testing that have been compiled with it,"

What other programs? Other than installing the alsa, headers, and modules packages in the ./current/testing directory I always seem to be able to run that kernel on a stock install with no other upgrades to desktop/productivity/media aps except for (of course) compiling new nvidia driver.

Since nvidia's proprietory I don't think you will ever see their own drivers in slack and some other distros too. For full nvidia features you will always need to compile from nvidia's script. Otherwise you'll be using the generic driver that works but not with all features.

BTW I'm still curious as to why taking out gnome breaks kde

friendly_guy 07-13-2005 05:43 PM

I always found it great that the 'vanilla' nature of Slack meant that the nvidia's drivers installed cleanly on my system straight away. It was something that attracted me to it.

I have also used Slack for music work with great success. The fact that so many source packages compiled cleanly meant that it was great for getting software rather than hunting for packages.

trigggl 07-14-2005 05:52 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by justwantin
"I sure am tired of clicking 'yes' for compile anyways even though I have the RivaTNT module as part of my kernel."

AFAIK the only nvidia driver that comes with slack is the generic nvidia driver "nv". If I want full features I have to compile drivers against kernel with script from the nvidia site. if I change kernels or use more than one kernel then I need a different (compiled) "nvidia" driver for each kernel. My video cards are secondhand (>= 3 yr old) but the most recent nvidia script "7174" works. It compiles for them as well as the newest nvidia cards.

"What good is a media drive that you need to be root to access."

Try changing your /etc/fstab to this?
/dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom iso9660 noauto,users,ro 0 0
It works.

"You have to remember to use all the other programs in testing that have been compiled with it,"

What other programs? Other than installing the alsa, headers, and modules packages in the ./current/testing directory I always seem to be able to run that kernel on a stock install with no other upgrades to desktop/productivity/media aps except for (of course) compiling new nvidia driver.

Since nvidia's proprietory I don't think you will ever see their own drivers in slack and some other distros too. For full nvidia features you will always need to compile from nvidia's script. Otherwise you'll be using the generic driver that works but not with all features.

BTW I'm still curious as to why taking out gnome breaks kde

I'm not sure why you're talking about what video driver comes with Slack. I get the nvidia driver from nvidia. The 'nv' driver included in the kernel is slow and skews my screen regardless of the distro I use, and yes all kernels that come with Slackware include RivaTNT as a module. Never mind, I've had it loaded for a while now and don't intend to tamper with it anymore. The nvidia driver that comes from nvidia does need to be compiled against the headers.

I looked at my fstab in Slackware and it said "owner" instead of "users", so that could be my problem there.

I was talking about alsa, and I thought I remembered GTK being there, too. I'm too lazy to look it up to be sure.

Well, it seemed like every time I wanted to add a program, I needed a gnome program to make it work. Try running KDE without any Gnome programs or libraries installed, I dare ya.

My computer is an oddball and it is kind of temperamental. Try running Slackware on an i820 board sometime and we can compare notes. I'm not trying to get down on Slackware, I was just expressing some feelings about the direction. Some of those feelings have changed by now because I'm actually getting the security emails I signed up for. That means that they must be getting some help. Funny that Debian had security issues the moment I switched. I change that fstab setting. Perhaps you would know what the best setting is for me to use my FAT32 partition. (Actually, I don't use Windows much anymore so I should probably just reformat it to something with modifiable permissions)

sporks 07-14-2005 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by trigggl
I'm not sure why you're talking about what video driver comes with Slack. I get the nvidia driver from nvidia. The 'nv' driver included in the kernel is slow and skews my screen regardless of the distro I use, and yes all kernels that come with Slackware include RivaTNT as a module. Never mind, I've had it loaded for a while now and don't intend to tamper with it anymore. The nvidia driver that comes from nvidia does need to be compiled against the headers.

I looked at my fstab in Slackware and it said "owner" instead of "users", so that could be my problem there.

I was talking about alsa, and I thought I remembered GTK being there, too. I'm too lazy to look it up to be sure.

Well, it seemed like every time I wanted to add a program, I needed a gnome program to make it work. Try running KDE without any Gnome programs or libraries installed, I dare ya.

There are no GNOME libraries that I can see that are required by KDE.

What libraries are you referring too? :confused:

trigggl 07-14-2005 09:15 AM

I'm done.
This has gone way off topic, and should be 5 pages down by now.
How does all this relate to:
Quote:

Originally posted by jmdicar
Has anyone heard when Slackware 11.0 will be release?

killerbob 07-14-2005 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by sporks
There are no GNOME libraries that I can see that are required by KDE.

What libraries are you referring too? :confused:

He's probably referring to the dependancies for some OS programs. It's annoying when I come across a program that I want to install, but I can't because I don't have arts installed (a KDE-library), or it fails because it demands libgnomeui.

That said, there's precious few programs out there which don't have a substitute that doesn't require either KDE or Gnome. I'm running a perfectly servicable system with XFCE as my main UI, on which I didn't install either KDE or Gnome. (I *did* install QT, but I don't have any programs that require it yet). For audio, I could use XMMS (though I don't like the skins or the size of it, so I'm using Zinf), I'm running xine, firefox/thunderbird, and because I don't like emacs, I'm running SciTE as my text editor. AbiWord works great as a word processor.

You just have to look a little harder to find programs that work without either Gnome or KDE. There *are* programs out there that just require GTK. There are also programs out there that don't require GTK, either.

Bruce Hill 07-14-2005 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by justwantin
slackware always seems to work time after time. Just work.

Any slack release is just a stable snapshot at that moment in time usually within 4 weeks my systems are evolving into something higher, sometimes with current sometimes without. It's just a solid base that you can leave alone or expand/change to suit your needs.

Just seems that for me I decided about 2 1/2 years ago that distro hoping didn't give me anything more than sticking with just one and sorting out what my problems were. It just turned out the ride stopped at slackware. I'm kind of grateful for that.

I took out your mention of Debian because apt-get ran me off and into the arms of Slackware.

Sticking with one distro is what I decided, also. And Slackware it is. If I'm still around when Pat isn't, there won't be any problem running Slackware forever. Unless one depends upon Pat, or whomever, to produce their software, and new kernels, you can just continue with what you've got, updating on your own.


As for the original question, here's my prediction:
Quote:

Original quote posted by Chinaman
Slackware-10.2 will come out in August with a 2.4.x kernel.
Slackware-11.0 will come out end of 2005, or early 2006, with a 2.6.x kernel.

But as others have said...just keep Slackware -current, and compile from source making Slackpacks of any other software you want, and hey, you're always running the next version.

Code:

mingdao@james:~$ cat /etc/slackware-version
Slackware -current
mingdao@james:~$ uname -a
Linux james 2.6.12.2 #3 Tue Jul 5 19:29:26 CST 2005 i686 AMD Athlon(TM) XP AuthenticAMD GNU/Linux

You're in charge here, bud, let's see what you can do :-D

slackMeUp 07-14-2005 10:25 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by trigggl
...
"When will Slackware 11.0 be out?"

When it's ready. ;)

Namaseit 07-14-2005 11:00 AM

Have I ever compiled a kernel? Yeah for about 5 years now thanks for asking. I don't remember saying they used the *exact* same options. Oh wait I didn't, i said some might be different. But lets see, if slackware kernel has most everything compiled as a module and debian kernel has most everything compiled as a module I'd think they are fairly close. Except version differences of course. Plus I don't remember saying you dropped slackware. I just said I didn't care if people used whatever distro they like. How did that imply as you dropping slack? I read in your previous post you use it to get camera images. I don't give a crap if you use all 386 distro's listed on distrowatch.com I was just trying to make the point that I think its dumb people making everything into distro wars.

But hey man whatever. I guess if you want to act hostile towards me and talk down to me then I'll be sure to ignore your threads.

Have a nice day.

Ilgar 07-14-2005 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by slackMeUp
When it's ready. ;)
From the Changelog:

Quote:

bootdisks/*: Regenerated bootdisks with "Slackware 10.2" label.
Looks like there'll be a 10.2 before 11.0.

Bruce Hill 07-14-2005 11:48 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Ilgar
Looks like there'll be a 10.2 before 11.0.
Post #38 .... you heard it here first :-D

carboncopy 07-14-2005 11:50 PM

And I am glad it is 10.2 before 11.0.

Am using Slackware-CURRENT, and my comment is, the current does not justify a major version increment. But it does justify a jump in minor version increment. Probably 10.3 or 10.4.

Nobber 07-15-2005 03:35 AM

It's funny how people put so much stock in major version numbers. :)

IMO, Ubuntu and Gentoo have got the most sensible numbering schemes. And Fedora's is nice and simple.

davidsrsb 07-15-2005 03:44 AM

I think that this version is worth a major jump, the mysql change from 4.0.x to 4.1.y has a lot of implications, the password encoding change in 4.1 broke several applications like the KnowledgeTree document management system.

KDE has advanced a lot since 10.1 as well.

GlowGlow 07-15-2005 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Chinaman
But as others have said...just keep Slackware -current, and compile from source making Slackpacks of any other software you want, and hey, you're always running the next version.

But, do buy the CD sets to keep Pat alive ;).

WH16 07-17-2005 01:23 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Namaseit But hey, whatever works for you is fine. If slackware isn't for then its your choice. Who cares what distro people use anyways. It's whatever you're more comfortable with is all. [/B]
Wrong. It's whether you are using any Linux distro or not :D

Please forgive me for replying to this while being logged into XP....

theapodan 07-18-2005 12:51 AM

BSD as alternative for slackware?
 
I would think that slackware users would tend to switch to FreeBSD were the distribution to veer away from its current path and design archetypes.

Especially with dual core chips becoming more frequent in time the 5.x series will soon have superior threading performance than linux with the advantages of running with threads in userspace, for increased security.

Namaseit 07-18-2005 03:19 AM

I wouldn't think so. Slackware is Slackware. Nothing as of yet that I've found can replace it. Just my personal thoughts though. If there was any deviation after Pat has retired from slackware maintainership I imagine his new Commander in Chief would be someone who would stay true to Slackware. If he didn't then I don't imagine Pat would let him stay as maintainer. Also I don't think Pat will ever stop having an active role in Slackware just he might not play as big a part as he has. But hey, what do I know. Conjecture is all any of us can do. What happens, happens. If there was any deviation then it's not Slackware, plain and simple.

Plus I don't see how it could go off course. Not like it's going to turn into Suse or FC. Slackware fits a niche that no one else does(to me). The direction of a distro that's as old as Slackware would be hard to deviate from. It's pretty well established what it is and what it tries to accomplish. Pretty hard to change things that are almost set in stone. I wouldn't imagine FC switching to using all deb's for its package management overnight. Or gentoo just giving up and saying, "hey lets use rpm's screw portage". But again, all conjecture. No one knows the future. And if they do then tell them to email me the winning lotto numbers. :)

btw, I hope no one misunderstands me. I'm not trying to attack anyone. Just giving my opinion. :)

GlowGlow 07-18-2005 05:25 AM

Re: BSD as alternative for slackware?
 
Quote:

Originally posted by theapodan
Especially with dual core chips becoming more frequent in time the 5.x series will soon have superior threading performance than linux with the advantages of running with threads in userspace, for increased security.
No one has ever proven this. The only somewhat massive and generally reliable benchmark shows that Linux 2.6 still has the edge, with NetBSD coming close fast (but not on the MP front yet).

http://bulk.fefe.de/scalability/


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