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Old 01-06-2018, 09:16 PM   #1
Lysander666
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Root user radically faster than main user


I took a scrot of something as root and noticed that I couldn't access it from my normal Lysander login. It must have gone into the root account, I thought. I logged into root [couldn't work out how to open the image as root in the terminal from my user account] and root was noticeably quicker.

All programs [save LibreOffice] opened almost instantly. Also the desktop setup was radically different, a standard LXDE setup. It actually didn't look half bad.

Now, this netbook is partitioned as /root, /home and /swap. when I installed Slackware over Debian I just installed it onto /root, I didn't format /home. Is is possible that settings have been saved from my previous Debian install on /home and that is slowing things down? Should I format /home while leaving /root as it is?
 
Old 01-07-2018, 01:58 AM   #2
ponce
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you can try creating a new user (note the step when you have to press the up arrow to put his in standard groups)

https://docs.slackware.com/slackbook:users

and see if with a pristine one you still have the slowness issue...
 
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Old 01-07-2018, 03:34 PM   #3
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lysander666 View Post
Is is possible that settings have been saved from my previous Debian install on /home and that is slowing things down?
When I install Slackware I always mount /home on its own partition. That way when I install Slackware 15.0 I will choose to mount,but, not format the /home partition. This allows me to keep all of my pictures, documents, and data.
Yes. I think it is possible that some of your Debian settings have been saved. I don't know if that would slow down your system.
 
Old 01-07-2018, 04:55 PM   #4
Lysander666
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ponce - I tried the new user, and it was a little faster. But really we are not talking much difference here. Using the install again, I would say we are talking about 1 second slower in opening some apps than root. I think last night it seemed a lot slower because I was installing a lot of packages and when switching to root everything was very fast in comparison.

hitest - yes some settings have been saved, e.g. the wallpaper was still the same when booted into Xfce on the new install. I think there is a slowdown but having tested it quite a bit today the difference is negligible. Leafpad and lxterminal are about one second slower to open. PCman is instant. Libreoffice is as slow as always to open!
 
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Old 01-07-2018, 08:28 PM   #5
ChuangTzu
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interesting, I don't think .config from Debian would cause issues on Slackware. It definitely could be installing programs or building them etc... perhaps mem, was being used elsewhere that time. Instead of new user you could always rename to .config_old then when you reopen programs they will create a new config but you still have old ones just in case things go screwy.

PS: Welcome to Slack.
 
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Old 01-08-2018, 03:55 AM   #6
FlinchX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lysander666 View Post
I didn't format /home. Is is possible that settings have been saved from my previous Debian install on /home and that is slowing things down? Should I format /home while leaving /root as it is?
Whenever I do that, in a pure Slackware context, for example when installing a new stable Slackware version from scratch, but not overwriting home, after adding a new user and logging into it, I move everything inside its home directory into ~/old. This way I keep multiple options:

- I can start a fresh config for particular app from scratch
- I can restore a config for the program in previous stable Slackware version from my backups
- I still keep all the old configs from previous Slackware version in ~/old, for research/diff/additional backup copy purposes
 
Old 01-08-2018, 04:43 AM   #7
Lysander666
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuangTzu View Post
interesting, I don't think .config from Debian would cause issues on Slackware. It definitely could be installing programs or building them etc... perhaps mem, was being used elsewhere that time. Instead of new user you could always rename to .config_old then when you reopen programs they will create a new config but you still have old ones just in case things go screwy.

PS: Welcome to Slack.
Thanks for the welcome. So this .config file presumably stores all the desktop settings [I'm away from my Slack install at the moment]. So I can safely rename it and a new one will be created?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlinchX View Post
Whenever I do that, in a pure Slackware context, for example when installing a new stable Slackware version from scratch, but not overwriting home, after adding a new user and logging into it, I move everything inside its home directory into ~/old.
When you say everything, could you be specific? I imagine your documents are not put into ~/old, but moreso the configuration files?

Last edited by Lysander666; 01-08-2018 at 04:47 AM.
 
Old 01-08-2018, 08:40 AM   #8
FlinchX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lysander666 View Post
When you say everything, could you be specific? I imagine your documents are not put into ~/old, but moreso the configuration files?
Literally everything. I store all my own files like documents, multimedia, code, on a separate partition (not /home, but yet another one) and just symlink directories from there into ~.
 
Old 01-08-2018, 11:02 AM   #9
Ook
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I saw this happen once. Running xfce and doing stuff as root was lightning fast. Any other user, including clean and brand new user accounts, was horribly slow.

In time I came to suspect that maybe the video card was defective, due to frequent crashing when using xfce (like every ten minutes ). I replaced it, and not only did it fix the crashing, but it fixed the performance problem. WHY and HOW was dog slow performance for non-root users caused by a bad video card??? I never did get an answer to that one. But replacing the video card fixed the non-root user performance problem.

Take that as you will and YMMV....
 
Old 01-08-2018, 07:59 PM   #10
ChuangTzu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lysander666 View Post
Thanks for the welcome. So this .config file presumably stores all the desktop settings [I'm away from my Slack install at the moment]. So I can safely rename it and a new one will be created?
yup...check under your /home/[user], if using thunar check show hidden... you will see .config, and inside is all the little config for all of your programs that you ever installed and opened. Often times, there is alot of cruft in there as well, programs you no longer use etc... To be safe, don't delete just rename it.

You can usually, safely, copy .config's from other distros if you like their setup, for instance an xfce setup or terminal etc...

Last edited by ChuangTzu; 01-08-2018 at 08:00 PM.
 
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