LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 04-27-2017, 06:17 PM   #1
limpingstone
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2017
Location: Mountain Time Area
Distribution: Slackware64 14.2
Posts: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Reducing Slackware Boot Time


I've switched from Ubuntu to Slackware since last month. Compared to Ubuntu, the boot time of Slackware seems to take more processes.

I turned on the boot text mode in Ubuntu and found that Ubuntu quickly loads into the kernel and eventually the GUI.

Slackware, however, starts with Loading Linux ... (followed by lots of dots) "BIOS Data Check successful", and finally boots into the kernel. Then it pauses at "mounting non-root partition" and "waiting for eth0". Ubuntu doesn't seem to need all this.

Is there a way to bring up the boot speed to that comparable to Ubuntu?
 
Old 04-27-2017, 06:19 PM   #2
Daedra
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Springfield, MO
Distribution: Slackware64-14.2
Posts: 1,538

Rep: Reputation: 371Reputation: 371Reputation: 371Reputation: 371
edit /etc/lilo.conf and uncomment the line that says "compact". that will speed up things a bit.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-27-2017, 06:44 PM   #3
Jeebizz
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Distribution: Slackware14.2 64-Bit Desktop, Devuan 2.0 ASCII Toshiba Satellite Notebook
Posts: 2,617

Rep: Reputation: 716Reputation: 716Reputation: 716Reputation: 716Reputation: 716Reputation: 716Reputation: 716
If you have an SSD it will scream even more - my system is a bit older (3 years) , so it does not support SSD M.2 - so I couldn't even imagine how much faster it would be .
 
Old 04-27-2017, 06:53 PM   #4
Darth Vader
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Location: Romania
Distribution: DARKSTAR Linux 2008.1
Posts: 2,727

Rep: Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231
Quote:
Originally Posted by limpingstone View Post
I've switched from Ubuntu to Slackware since last month. Compared to Ubuntu, the boot time of Slackware seems to take more processes.

I turned on the boot text mode in Ubuntu and found that Ubuntu quickly loads into the kernel and eventually the GUI.

Slackware, however, starts with Loading Linux ... (followed by lots of dots) "BIOS Data Check successful", and finally boots into the kernel. Then it pauses at "mounting non-root partition" and "waiting for eth0". Ubuntu doesn't seem to need all this.

Is there a way to bring up the boot speed to that comparable to Ubuntu?
That's just one of the positive effects of using SystemD.

BUT, I strongly recommend you to avoid to comment about the SystemD technology in that Slackware forum.

Would be just like a Jehovah Witness going to preach in Mecca. If you are really lucky, you will be just beheaded (read: banned).
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-27-2017, 06:55 PM   #5
Jeebizz
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Distribution: Slackware14.2 64-Bit Desktop, Devuan 2.0 ASCII Toshiba Satellite Notebook
Posts: 2,617

Rep: Reputation: 716Reputation: 716Reputation: 716Reputation: 716Reputation: 716Reputation: 716Reputation: 716
Speaking of the thing that should not be named, I actually found that Ubuntu-Mate on my Toshiba Satellite is actually slow as balls when it comes to booting up, even though it has a hybrid ssd drive.

Last edited by Jeebizz; 04-27-2017 at 07:08 PM.
 
Old 04-27-2017, 07:16 PM   #6
Darth Vader
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Location: Romania
Distribution: DARKSTAR Linux 2008.1
Posts: 2,727

Rep: Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231Reputation: 1231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeebizz View Post
Speaking of the thing that should not be named, I actually found that Ubuntu-Mate on my Toshiba Satellite is actually slow as balls when it comes to booting up, even though it has a hybrid ssd drive.
That's just a failing SATA link. Believe or not, an imperfect SATA cable, or even an dirty SATA slot, could make you to move the mouse, then smoke a cigar while drinking slowly a beer and finally you worth to look about the effect of your initial action...

Last edited by Darth Vader; 04-27-2017 at 07:21 PM.
 
Old 04-27-2017, 07:49 PM   #7
ChuangTzu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2015
Location: Where ever needed
Distribution: Slackware/Salix, FreeBSD
Posts: 1,065

Rep: Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835
1) switch from huge kernel to generic
2) play around with what is loaded in /etc/rc.d
3) dont start services you don't need.
4) Salix has a nice startup script that speeds up the boot, you can either use that or review it and modify to your liking
5) dont shut down unless necessary just resume from suspend
6) switch to openrc if desired
7) power on and go make some coffee, kiss wife, quick shag etc...
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-27-2017, 07:57 PM   #8
Gerard Lally
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Slackware, Crux, NetBSD
Posts: 1,448

Rep: Reputation: 905Reputation: 905Reputation: 905Reputation: 905Reputation: 905Reputation: 905Reputation: 905Reputation: 905
Quote:
Originally Posted by limpingstone View Post
Is there a way to bring up the boot speed to that comparable to Ubuntu?
There are several ways of improving the boot speed. Before going through them all we'd have to be sure it really is that important to you. How many times a day do you boot up, and how long does it take?
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-27-2017, 08:23 PM   #9
limpingstone
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2017
Location: Mountain Time Area
Distribution: Slackware64 14.2
Posts: 52

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
That's just one of the positive effects of using SystemD.

BUT, I strongly recommend you to avoid to comment about the SystemD technology in that Slackware forum.

Would be just like a Jehovah Witness going to preach in Mecca. If you are really lucky, you will be just beheaded (read: banned).
Ahh thanks I do not know about the 'taboos' in the forum. Just being curious.
Don't ban me please. LOLOL

Is it also the case that LILO and GRUB makes a difference in booting as well?
 
Old 04-27-2017, 08:29 PM   #10
limpingstone
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2017
Location: Mountain Time Area
Distribution: Slackware64 14.2
Posts: 52

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerard Lally View Post
There are several ways of improving the boot speed. Before going through them all we'd have to be sure it really is that important to you. How many times a day do you boot up, and how long does it take?
I usually turns on the computer twice to three times a day, and it takes a little longer than 90 seconds.
An in fact, it is all fine. I have a friends who uses Linux Mint and commented that Slackware boots slow.

But it seems that Slackware could be customized on which services to be started.
So I was wondering if there is a way to play around with the boot settings.
 
Old 04-27-2017, 08:36 PM   #11
ChuangTzu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2015
Location: Where ever needed
Distribution: Slackware/Salix, FreeBSD
Posts: 1,065

Rep: Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835
Quote:
Originally Posted by limpingstone View Post
I usually turns on the computer twice to three times a day, and it takes a little longer than 90 seconds.
An in fact, it is all fine. I have a friends who uses Linux Mint and commented that Slackware boots slow.

But it seems that Slackware could be customized on which services to be started.
So I was wondering if there is a way to play around with the boot settings.
in addition to what was posted earlier:
http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:beginners_guide

scroll down to:
Miscellaneous
Why does Slackware take so long to boot up?
http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:faq

Last edited by ChuangTzu; 04-27-2017 at 08:39 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-27-2017, 08:49 PM   #12
bilbod
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Posts: 134

Rep: Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeebizz View Post
If you have an SSD it will scream even more - my system is a bit older (3 years) , so it does not support SSD M.2 - so I couldn't even imagine how much faster it would be .
Benchmarks have SSDs performing 7 times faster than HDs.

I've been using Linux for a long time and I have only found 2 things that noticeably improve performance.

1. Switching from a DE to iceWM which I did a long time ago.
2. Switching from a HD to SSD.

The SSD makes the system boot faster and launch programs faster. I use 2 drives, SSD on / and a larger HD on /home.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-27-2017, 08:57 PM   #13
mralk3
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2015
Location: Utah, USA
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 || Slackware-current && CentOS
Posts: 1,321

Rep: Reputation: 696Reputation: 696Reputation: 696Reputation: 696Reputation: 696Reputation: 696
A couple years ago I switched to Slackware from Debian right around the time that shall not be named was invading Linux space. I wondered about the boot up time taking so long as well after having seen that shall not be named start my system in some ridiculously low time frame.

I quickly dismissed this issue after I saw how harmonious Slackware is for every day use.

Also, suspend to disk/RAM for the win.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-27-2017, 10:47 PM   #14
bassmadrigal
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: West Jordan, UT, USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 5,436

Rep: Reputation: 3211Reputation: 3211Reputation: 3211Reputation: 3211Reputation: 3211Reputation: 3211Reputation: 3211Reputation: 3211Reputation: 3211Reputation: 3211Reputation: 3211
Slackware and Ubuntu use different boot systems. Ubuntu's tends to boot quite a bit faster due to its boot system. There are a few things you can do to speed up your system, most of which has already been mentioned, but it is unlikely you'll get it to the same speed that Ubuntu has without some serious modifications to the boot scripts. Simply put, Slackware doesn't push for extremely quick boot times. The BSD-style init scripts Slackware uses value simplicity over speed. The scripts are relatively easy to read and modify (if you're familiar with bash scripting).

Uncommenting compact in your lilo (like Daedra mentioned) will speed up your kernel booting. It works on pretty much all modern computers, but it may not work on older computers (but we're talking probably pre-2000 computers).

Another thing you can do is to make sure all non-needed services aren't running. You can go through /etc/rc.d/ and make sure any services you aren't using aren't executable.

Theoretically, switching to the generic kernel should speed up the boot time, but I'm not sure it'd be that noticeable. However, Pat recommends running the generic kernel either way.

Finally, as mralk3 suggested, if boot time is important to you, it might be worth looking into using suspending or hibernation. While rebooting will still take long, it would lead to quick resuming, which I imagine would be good enough.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-27-2017, 11:02 PM   #15
Richard Cranium
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2009
Location: Carrollton, Texas
Distribution: Slackware64 14.2
Posts: 3,071

Rep: Reputation: 1455Reputation: 1455Reputation: 1455Reputation: 1455Reputation: 1455Reputation: 1455Reputation: 1455Reputation: 1455Reputation: 1455Reputation: 1455
Quote:
Originally Posted by limpingstone View Post
Is there a way to bring up the boot speed to that comparable to Ubuntu?
Define "comparable" first.

Ubuntu does a lot of things in parallel during init. Slackware doesn't.

Doing things in parallel can result in a huge speed-up as you've noticed. It can also (and I am not claiming that SystemD has this problem) result in some very difficult to track down bugs that exist on some systems but not on others.

How? If you don't express *all* the dependencies in the init order, you can end up with systems who are able to boot successfully simply because they do one of the boot services a little faster or slower than the systems that fail.

If you have a defined sequential boot order, you don't have *that* problem. You do have a slower boot.

Most of the time, a slower boot is not a big deal because you don't reboot that often. If you have a machine running a huge number of linux containers with a SLA requiring you to restart those puppies in 30 seconds, you care a lot about your boot times. If you launch docker instances on demand or something similar, you really want those things to come up right freaking now.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: Koschei: Reducing bugs and saving time LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 06-16-2016 05:55 PM
Help with reducing boot time CuriousLittlePenguin Ubuntu 2 08-19-2014 02:03 PM
reducing the bootup time hoshangi Red Hat 1 02-09-2008 07:54 AM
Reducing Boot Time sharkee Ubuntu 2 01-13-2006 10:34 PM
Reducing Startup Time w/Mandrake 9.1 eric_hcr80 Linux - Newbie 5 07-13-2003 04:18 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:51 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration