LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 06-27-2020, 08:46 PM   #91
TheNutCase
Member
 
Registered: May 2016
Location: Columbia, South Carolina14
Distribution: Slackware 14.2
Posts: 334

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alien Bob View Post
You really need to learn more about Slackware and Linux - this thread is a grim show of hand-holding and it does not seem to get any better.
Try blocking an hour every day and spend that reading, for instance docs.slackware.com introductory pages, also the Slack Book.
No offense meant, I really want you to up your game.
Perhaps if Slackware were redesigned to be a bit more user-friendly?
 
Old 06-27-2020, 10:58 PM   #92
TheNutCase
Member
 
Registered: May 2016
Location: Columbia, South Carolina14
Distribution: Slackware 14.2
Posts: 334

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
GREAT NEWS!!! I finally got MuseScore to recognize my USB MIDI keyboard! It turnes out that in order to do that, I Had to start MuseScore and then open Portmidi (while still in MuseScore).
 
Old 06-28-2020, 03:53 AM   #93
Alien Bob
Slackware Contributor
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 8,063

Rep: Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheNutCase View Post
Perhaps if Slackware were redesigned to be a bit more user-friendly?
If you think user-friendlyness should be the defining factor of this distro, then perhaps you are in the wrong place.
 
Old 06-28-2020, 04:20 AM   #94
ponce
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: Pisa, Italy
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 5,481

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheNutCase View Post
Perhaps if Slackware were redesigned to be a bit more user-friendly?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alien Bob View Post
If you think user-friendlyness should be the defining factor of this distro, then perhaps you are in the wrong place.
...and then also what he meant by "user-friendly", as Slackware is very friendly towards me and I don't think I'm an isolated case...
 
Old 06-28-2020, 05:01 AM   #95
kgha
Member
 
Registered: May 2018
Location: Sweden
Distribution: Slackware 64 -current multilib from AlienBob's LiveSlak MATE
Posts: 315

Rep: Reputation: 231Reputation: 231Reputation: 231
Well, just as some of AlienBob's posts may mislead you to believe that he's unfriendly and unhelpful (while, in fact, the opposite is true), it would be wrong to think about slackware as not user-friendly. It won't give you an 'easy' plug-and-play system, but true friendship is about more than just being easygoing. It's also about challenges and resolving them.
Admittedly there will be surprises now and then, but hardly ever nasty ones (there are other OSs that might give you those).

Last edited by kgha; 06-28-2020 at 05:02 AM.
 
Old 06-28-2020, 05:51 AM   #96
Alien Bob
Slackware Contributor
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 8,063

Rep: Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825
We may have different views of 'user-friendly' perhaps. Like ponce and kgha said, the Slackware OS is friendly to its user in the sense that it does not hide its internals and you will always be able to find out and understand when something does not work or is not working as you expected.
But that requires an investigative mindset and a willingness to learn.
User-friendly is often the phrase used to describe OS-es like MS Windows, OS-X or Ubuntu, Mint etc - but then it means that 'everything just works' and the user can be as computer-illiterate as you want, things work regardless. The user does not have to understand what happens under the hood to make all of this computer stuff work so seemingly effortless.
The watershed moment comes when something does not work or stops working - and then this user will be lost.
I do admire your persistence TheNutCase. You'll get there.
 
Old 06-28-2020, 09:48 AM   #97
karlmag
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2014
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 46

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheNutCase View Post
Perhaps if Slackware were redesigned to be a bit more user-friendly?

Ah...
Do *not* confuse "user-friendly" with "beginner-friendly".
They *may* be two quite different things.


Thanks
--
KarlMag
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 06-28-2020, 10:21 PM   #98
TheNutCase
Member
 
Registered: May 2016
Location: Columbia, South Carolina14
Distribution: Slackware 14.2
Posts: 334

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alien Bob View Post
We may have different views of 'user-friendly' perhaps. Like ponce and kgha said, the Slackware OS is friendly to its user in the sense that it does not hide its internals and you will always be able to find out and understand when something does not work or is not working as you expected.
But that requires an investigative mindset and a willingness to learn.
User-friendly is often the phrase used to describe OS-es like MS Windows, OS-X or Ubuntu, Mint etc - but then it means that 'everything just works' and the user can be as computer-illiterate as you want, things work regardless. The user does not have to understand what happens under the hood to make all of this computer stuff work so seemingly effortless.
The watershed moment comes when something does not work or stops working - and then this user will be lost.
I do admire your persistence TheNutCase. You'll get there.
Permit me to clarify what I meant when I said "user friendly" - I meant, for example that it would help users such as myself if the documentation were presented in layman's terms (wheerever possible), rather than what seems like "technical mumbo-jumbo".
 
Old 06-29-2020, 01:19 AM   #99
Alien Bob
Slackware Contributor
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 8,063

Rep: Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825Reputation: 6825
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheNutCase View Post
Permit me to clarify what I meant when I said "user friendly" - I meant, for example that it would help users such as myself if the documentation were presented in layman's terms (wheerever possible), rather than what seems like "technical mumbo-jumbo".
Your statement was "Perhaps if Slackware were redesigned to be a bit more user-friendly?". That did not make me think about the documentation but rather about the way the distro presents itself to its user.

This is Slackware - it is not fit for everybody and it will not be 're-designed' to try and get more people on board.
If the documentation at https://docs.slackware.com/ is too technical and difficult to follow, feel free to contribute your knowledge. After all this documentation wiki is a community project. Specifically, if you ran into issues you feel could have been resolved by (better) documentation, please share your views here.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 06-29-2020, 02:17 AM   #100
Didier Spaier
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Location: Paris, France
Distribution: Slint64-14.2.1.2 on Lenovo Thinkpad W520
Posts: 9,391

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheNutCase View Post
Permit me to clarify what I meant when I said "user friendly" - I meant, for example that it would help users such as myself if the documentation were presented in layman's terms (wheerever possible), rather than what seems like "technical mumbo-jumbo".
Maybe something like the attached glossary could help fill the gap? My take on this is that using technical terms in the documentation is unavoidable, but presenting them in layman's term could help folks with no technical background understand them.
Attached Files
File Type: txt Glossary.txt (3.8 KB, 8 views)
 
Old 06-29-2020, 02:35 AM   #101
BrunoLafleur
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2020
Location: France
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 73

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheNutCase View Post
Perhaps if Slackware were redesigned to be a bit more user-friendly?
I think the specific problems Musescore may have are not the fault of the Slackware distribution.

Also we can have those sort of problems with other distributions. It may be even easier to do mistakes on others.
 
Old 06-30-2020, 12:45 AM   #102
TheNutCase
Member
 
Registered: May 2016
Location: Columbia, South Carolina14
Distribution: Slackware 14.2
Posts: 334

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I also discovered that the way to get MuseScore to recognize a USB MIDI keyboard is to first start MuseScore, then open portmidi (while still in MuseScore), and set your USB MIDI keyboard as the default input device, in that way you can then go the "Preferences" menu, click on the I/O tab, and click the box beside the "portaudio" section, and you should then be able to select your input device.

Last edited by TheNutCase; 06-30-2020 at 12:47 AM.
 
Old 06-30-2020, 08:24 AM   #103
BrunoLafleur
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2020
Location: France
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 73

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
May be Musescore has to be tested more. I had some problems with Musescore and some .mxl files for examples. It is sensible to errors in those files (or things Musescore though about errors). In those cases it segfaults.

I think there is some areas of Musescore which are not well tested.

I don't think Slackware is really faulty here. I don't see how it could but ?
Maybe you could ask to Musescore folks in case your problem is reproducible.
 
Old 07-01-2020, 02:25 AM   #104
Geist
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2013
Distribution: Slackware 14 / current
Posts: 395

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I also have trouble with Musescore routinely, its JACK integration seems spotty and janky. Not Slackwares fault. My other JACK tools work perfectly fine.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] Trouble building Musescore on Slackware 64 Captain Pinkeye Slackware 7 06-30-2014 12:41 PM
[SOLVED] Musescore won't install on Intel 64 bit CPU PC, help please alex polvorilla Linux - Software 3 12-30-2012 02:46 PM
LXer: MuseScore, LilyPond, and Chordii: Projects on the Move LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 03-29-2011 05:40 AM
Classical organ sound fonts for MuseScore Tom Nichol Linux - Software 0 06-18-2009 02:30 PM
MusEScore 0.1pre2 compilation issues stev160 Linux - Software 0 07-15-2004 09:59 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:12 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration