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Old 01-05-2019, 04:05 AM   #16
nobodino
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well for the time beeing, I'm at home only on the WE, and that until next summer, so not much time to compile.
thanks for the answer, all of you.
We'll see (maybe) some 'cloners' trying SFS?
Cheers
 
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Old 01-05-2019, 05:46 AM   #17
gnashley
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Learning something is its' own reward and I know well that you've learned a thousand things on your way to even one successful re-compile. You have a lot to be proud of, so don't let any detractors take that from you.
 
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Old 01-05-2019, 06:13 AM   #18
Alien Bob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnashley View Post
Learning something is its' own reward and I know well that you've learned a thousand things on your way to even one successful re-compile. You have a lot to be proud of, so don't let any detractors take that from you.
I fully agree. Your SFS is an interesting project, and it grew a lot once you started logging its progress in your git repository. It's a prime example of how a mental itch that needed some scratching ended up being a real project with contributors and a lot of interested people looking on.

I have a personal interest because I remember when I had to build the 64bit port of Slackware from scratch, it was quite challenging to find a good build order and the necessary patches to make older sources compile. It was not trivial, even with Patrick sharing his thoughts and giving guidelines (especially about the inter-dependencies of kernel, binutils, glibc and gcc). Therefore I have nothing but respect for your and Worsel's efforts.

Hopefully now that SFS compiles errorfree in one single run, it's going to be smooth sailing. And I guess even Patrick may have been energized by SFS, looking at how he started his FTBSlog notes (FTBS = Fails To Build from Source), like this example: http://ftp.slackware.com/pub/slackwa...rce/a/FTBFSlog.

Thank you.
 
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Old 01-05-2019, 07:34 AM   #19
rainydais
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For what it's worth, I am very interested in the SFS project and have been wanting to give it a go for sometime. I just never made enough time to go for it. I am very thankful that the project exists on GitHub and is active.
 
Old 01-05-2019, 08:30 AM   #20
nobodino
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For those who still hesitate at trying SFS, just read the howto-SFS: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/no...tion/howto-SFS
It's not complicated at all, there are very few adjustments. If you're really lazy just decide on which partition to build it, the other adjustments can be made later.
The longest things are:
1/ build the 'tools', about 40 mn on my machine (not a 'horse power')
2/ once you've built the tools, you'll have to wait some time (> 19 h on my machine)
 
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:55 AM   #21
Uncle Lumpy
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Can you describe the potential benefits of this (beyond the very interesting academic exercise of doing it) to the Slackware user? I've been using Slackware as my desktop OS (and as the OS for the small home server farm I run) for 10-15 years. Obviously I'm happy with Slackware and what it provides. What can SFS do for me? Are there specific optimizations I can make during the build process that might benefit me with regard to speed? (Hard to imagine that it's more stable than Pat's Slackware.)

I'm interested in doing this and have the time. I'd be *motivated* to do this if there were the potential for tangible benefits to me as a Slackware user.

Best,
Lumpy
 
Old 01-05-2019, 10:34 AM   #22
nobodino
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this project doesn't bring anything to the average user.
this project is for fun.
this project is for those who want to learn about Slackware.
this project is for curious people who want to try the ability of Slackware to rebuild itself, nothing else.
I don't say you're not curious;: if you don't feel the necessity to try it, I'm not here to convince you to do it, sorry.

Last edited by nobodino; 01-05-2019 at 10:35 AM.
 
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Old 01-05-2019, 07:19 PM   #23
Uncle Lumpy
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OK, thanks for the response, nobodino!

Best,
Lumpy
 
Old 01-05-2019, 08:34 PM   #24
montagdude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnashley View Post
Learning something is its' own reward and I know well that you've learned a thousand things on your way to even one successful re-compile. You have a lot to be proud of, so don't let any detractors take that from you.
I was just teasing with my previous post, in case it wasn't clear. I already wrote that I thought it was a valuable endeavor.
 
Old 01-07-2019, 08:52 PM   #25
blizzack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodino View Post
well for the time beeing, I'm at home only on the WE, and that until next summer, so not much time to compile.
thanks for the answer, all of you.
We'll see (maybe) some 'cloners' trying SFS?
Cheers
Pls don't give up on this.

I'm one of those slackers that will try out sfs at some point

many thanx to both of you for doing this invaluable work!
 
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Old 01-07-2019, 10:50 PM   #26
ttk
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Yes, please don't give up on SFS :-)

I intend to incorporate your hard-earned lessons into Slackhammer when it I'm ready to work on that part of it. For the time being, when I work on Slackhammer, I work on its package upstream identification instead.

IMO, SFS is important for a couple of other reasons, too:

First, to ensure the future continuity of the Slackware project itself. If (heaven forbid) something should "happen" to Patrick, and the line of succession for Slackware BDFL is either broken or unacceptable, SFS assures that other qualified users in the Slackware community could potentially "take up the Slack".

Second, to help promote new Slackware forks. Forking is a normal and healthy way to assure Slackware-like experiences to a wider audience of users. The availability of SFS removes one more obstacle from anyone forking their own Slackware-like distribution (assuming recompilation is necessary for that fork).

I know it's hard work to figure this out, but it's totally worth it. The lessons you are learning and sharing with the community are highly valuable.
 
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Old 01-08-2019, 10:26 AM   #27
Qury
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Good work on SFS!

I wish i could get a threadripper cpu and have a bunch of time.... i keep dreaming of a systems that is like SFS + SlackADS from Ivandi + KDE5 from AlienBOB + jack2 and Ardour
 
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Old 01-08-2019, 04:28 PM   #28
nobodino
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Don't misunderstand me, I don't want to give up with SFS, I can only access the forum with my smartphone and nothing else while working far from my home. I can work on it only on the WE, that's all.
 
Old 01-08-2019, 05:08 PM   #29
Poprocks
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I think it is an extremely worthwhile project. I was thinking of firing it up myself on a virtual machine, as an exercise.

It may be a niche project in terms of end users, but I'd imagine it's SUPER helpful to the core team, in terms of (a) ensuring the SlackBuilds continue to build as expected, (b) ensuring a build order is known, documented and maintained, and (c) having a potential framework in place to easily port Slackware to other architectures, something which is becoming more and more important these days, as architectures such as ARM and the upcoming RISC-V gain momentum and popularity.
 
Old 01-12-2019, 04:02 PM   #30
enorbet
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I always just do Full Recommended Install because hdd space is cheaper than my time and frustration. I go by the old adage.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldAdage(paraphrased)
It's better to have a dependency and not need it than to need it and not have it
 
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