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Old 08-09-2019, 02:13 PM   #46
garpu
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Registered: Oct 2009
Distribution: Slackware
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Yeah, I look forward to my fortune every morning, too. And without xsnow, how would I decorate for Christmas?

One of the many things that annoyed me about Arch was that ddate was "deprecated."
 
3 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-09-2019, 03:53 PM   #47
average_user
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Registered: Dec 2010
Location: Warsaw, Poland
Distribution: Slackware
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garpu View Post
Yeah, I look forward to my fortune every morning, too.
I took it to the next level and added
Code:
cowsay -w "$(fortune)"
to my ~/.bashrc so that I can get more wisdom each time I open a new window in screen. The one I got just now:
Code:
_________________________________________
/ Just as most issues are seldom black or \
| white, so are most good solutions       |
| seldom black or white. Beware of the    |
| solution that requires one side to be   |
| totally the loser and the other side to |
| be totally the winner. The reason there |
| are two sides to begin with usually is  |
| because neither side has all the facts. |
| Therefore, when the wise mediator       |
| effects a compromise, he is not acting  |
| from political motivation. Rather, he   |
| is acting from a deep sense of respect  |
| for the whole truth. -- Stephen R.      |
\ Schwambach                              /
 -----------------------------------------
        \   ^__^
         \  (OO)\_______
            (__)\       )\/\
                ||----w |
                ||     ||
cowsay is available at slackbuilds.
 
5 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-09-2019, 11:18 PM   #48
Richard Cranium
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Registered: Apr 2009
Location: Carrollton, Texas
Distribution: Slackware64 14.2
Posts: 3,368

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdGr View Post
Pat gets to do this because he is the one getting paid (sometimes).
Ed
You know, there's this thing about how your itches are your itches and perhaps aren't the same itches as other people's; so, if you want them scratched, you should do it yourself. There's another thing as well about everything is easy to the people who don't have to do it.

I guess my advice to you is to not hold your breath during the period when you expect this to be done.
 
3 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-10-2019, 12:06 AM   #49
EdGr
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Registered: Dec 2010
Location: California, USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 205

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium
You know, there's this thing about how your itches are your itches and perhaps aren't the same itches as other people's; so, if you want them scratched, you should do it yourself. There's another thing as well about everything is easy to the people who don't have to do it.
I am just making a suggestion. I am already quite busy with my own software.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GazL
I know it's a strange concept, and in this modern era things are continually modified, or even thrown out just when they're getting good in order to start again (Gnome 2), but in the old days one might actually finish a program. I suggest that perhaps they don't need updating because they're 'complete'.
This observation applies only to very small programs.

Programs of any size are never complete, never fully debugged, never free of security vulnerabilities, and never immune to changes in other programs around them. Non-trivial programs require maintenance.

For people who posted silly responses, think about whether you want software on your computers that has not been maintained for a decade or two.

Good night, everyone.
Ed
 
Old 08-10-2019, 12:16 AM   #50
glorsplitz
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Registered: Dec 2002
Distribution: slackware!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdGr View Post
For people who posted silly responses, think about whether you want software on your computers that has not been maintained for a decade or two.
what about software that is maintained but i haven't used in a decade or two?
 
Old 08-10-2019, 12:41 AM   #51
Gerard Lally
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Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Brú na Bóinne, IE
Distribution: Slackware, NetBSD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdGr View Post
This observation applies only to very small programs.

Programs of any size are never complete, never fully debugged, never free of security vulnerabilities, and never immune to changes in other programs around them. Non-trivial programs require maintenance.

For people who posted silly responses, think about whether you want software on your computers that has not been maintained for a decade or two.
Ed
On that basis you might as well drop TeX as well.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-10-2019, 12:48 AM   #52
Richard Cranium
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Location: Carrollton, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdGr View Post
I am just making a suggestion. I am already quite busy with my own software.
As the old reply goes, "Thank you for your input."

Take care.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-10-2019, 01:50 AM   #53
Mechanikx
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Registered: Jul 2018
Location: Canada
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 172

Rep: Reputation: 136Reputation: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by average_user View Post
I took it to the next level and added
Code:
cowsay -w "$(fortune)"
to my ~/.bashrc so that I can get more wisdom each time I open a new window in screen. The one I got just now:
Code:
_________________________________________
/ Just as most issues are seldom black or \
| white, so are most good solutions       |
| seldom black or white. Beware of the    |
| solution that requires one side to be   |
| totally the loser and the other side to |
| be totally the winner. The reason there |
| are two sides to begin with usually is  |
| because neither side has all the facts. |
| Therefore, when the wise mediator       |
| effects a compromise, he is not acting  |
| from political motivation. Rather, he   |
| is acting from a deep sense of respect  |
| for the whole truth. -- Stephen R.      |
\ Schwambach                              /
 -----------------------------------------
        \   ^__^
         \  (OO)\_______
            (__)\       )\/\
                ||----w |
                ||     ||
cowsay is available at slackbuilds.
Thanks for sharing! Cowsay was my first Slackbuild when I first started using Slackware. I never would've thought to do this
 
Old 08-10-2019, 12:55 PM   #54
Mechanikx
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2018
Location: Canada
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 172

Rep: Reputation: 136Reputation: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mechanikx View Post
Thanks for sharing! Cowsay was my first Slackbuild when I first started using Slackware. I never would've thought to do this
I went with Beavis

Code:
 _________________________________________
/ According to the obituary notices, a    \
\ mean and unimportant person never dies. /
 -----------------------------------------
   \         __------~~-,
    \      ,'            ,
          /               \
         /                :
        |                  '
        |                  |
        |                  |
         |   _--           |
         _| =-.     .-.   ||
         o|/o/       _.   |
         /  ~          \ |
       (____@)  ___~    |
          |_===~~~.`    |
       _______.--~     |
       \________       |
                \      |
              __/-___-- -__
             /            _ \
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-10-2019, 03:36 PM   #55
akimmet
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2018
Location: NW Ohio, USA
Distribution: Slackware64 -current
Posts: 42

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdGr View Post
I am just making a suggestion. I am already quite busy with my own software.

This observation applies only to very small programs.

Programs of any size are never complete, never fully debugged, never free of security vulnerabilities, and never immune to changes in other programs around them. Non-trivial programs require maintenance.

For people who posted silly responses, think about whether you want software on your computers that has not been maintained for a decade or two.

Good night, everyone.
Ed
You got silly responses because many here found your suggestion rather silly.
The last revision date dose not automatically determine if something is useless or not. Slackware is one of the few distros willing to keep and even maintain some of this software, rather than automatically assume anything old must be discarded and forgotten.
 
3 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-10-2019, 05:07 PM   #56
bifferos
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Registered: Jul 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kgha View Post
No one forces you to make a full install.
But that's not entirely true is it? It's been discussed in other threads that you're obliged to make the full install if you want support.

I'm not sure why the OP got such a negative response. It's not a silly question. It's great to see these threads once in a while so we can confirm people are still using stuff, otherwise we'd never know.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-10-2019, 06:22 PM   #57
andrew.46
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Registered: Oct 2007
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 1,025

Rep: Reputation: 256Reputation: 256Reputation: 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by bifferos View Post
I'm not sure why the OP got such a negative response. It's not a silly question. It's great to see these threads once in a while so we can confirm people are still using stuff, otherwise we'd never know.
Indeed. I see that PV has taken the opportunity to patch up amp so at least something very positive has come from this. On a less global note this thread has inspired me to dump procmail and start using maildrop...
 
3 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-11-2019, 05:11 AM   #58
GazL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andrew.46 View Post
Indeed. I see that PV has taken the opportunity to patch up amp so at least something very positive has come from this.
That surprised me. I really expected that one to be dropped when it turned out to be broken, especially as no one had noticed until I played with it out of nostalgia after seeing it mentioned in this thread. I guess that's just one of those quirky decisions that gives Slackware its character.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-11-2019, 01:15 PM   #59
the3dfxdude
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Registered: May 2007
Posts: 567

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labinnah View Post
But trivial to fix. Problem was aggressive optimizations in modern compilers not expected in ancient times:
Which is why distros that make it a practice to automatically recompile packages every release is very bad. This is another reason I've stayed with slackware all these years. BTW, other distros rarely drop packages as well, and they end up broken all the time through the mindless tweaking such as this.

**As a side comment on recompiling packages; the reproducible builds. That can be a good academic exercise, but not one that is all that beneficial towards distros. The same sort of problem can still creep in for these same community driven distro projects; people making decisions with a poor understanding.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-11-2019, 04:24 PM   #60
TheRealGrogan
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Registered: Oct 2010
Location: Ontario, Canada
Distribution: Slackware, Manjaro (for gaming)
Posts: 106

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Good advice for someone new to Slackware, and especially new to Linux in general, but you don't have to do a full install, because someone in a forum says so. The Slackware installer has always had excellent menus for choosing the packages you want. You do need to be careful with (have knowledge of) dependencies, of course, but to say a full install is mandatory is laziness.

If you don't know, it would be safer to install everything in l, and possibly most libraries in n, but applications are easy enough to deselect if you don't want them and there are entire categories you can skip if you don't intend to use them. I don't install anything from e, f, KDE, k, t, XFCE and I only install what I want from ap and xap. There are also some packages in the a series I don't install (but I know what I'm doing). I install most of l except for a few things I know I don't want and most of d because I build a lot of software. I miss deselecting some things just because I want to get the install going, but later, as things come up for update in -current I come across more things I can decide to remove so they don't have to be updated. Sometimes I'm wrong, and I'll have to put something back unless I replace the thing that was linked to it. An example that comes to mind is esound. I hate that (from decades ago) yet I still have packages that are linked.

Missing packages are some of the easier problems to solve. Piecemeal upgrading of packages from -current and out of sync, broken third party cause more misdirection.

That said, this would be one of the few forums where I'd even bother to ask a question if I needed to. What I generally get are crickets chirping and "why do you want to do that?" type answers. If I answer a question in some of those places, I get admonished for non herd answers. The quality of the answers here is the reason I started participating.
 
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