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-   -   Noteworthy For dual booters on UEFI (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/noteworthy-for-dual-booters-on-uefi-4175475744/)

AlleyTrotter 09-03-2013 01:34 PM

Noteworthy For dual booters on UEFI
 
To those who still dual boot windows this may be of use. It describes setting up a secure boot kernel.
http://www.linuxfoundation.org/news-...d-linux-kernel

Hope this is of help to some.
John

edorig 09-03-2013 02:22 PM

I have seen that post. But the author writes:
Quote:

As no bootloader is going to be involved in the boot process, you need
to ensure that the kernel knows where the root partition is, what init
is going to be run, and anything else that the bootloader normally
passes to the kernel image.
So it is only a post-install process, where one compiles a specially tailored kernel
to allow Secure Boot in Linux.It also requires to have a boot partition in FAT mode
to store the kernel.

AlleyTrotter 09-03-2013 02:56 PM

That is correct it describes how to create a secure boot kernel which can be used to dual boot with Windows without disabling secure boot. To UEFI boot you must have a EFI partition with a fat filesystem no matter the OS used.
If its no help to you it may be help to others.
No bootloader is needed because the kernel acts as its own bootloader.
Personally I haven't used windows in quite some time, however I do use UEFI boot with slackware.
John

xj25vm 09-06-2013 05:51 AM

Last time I tried EFI stub booting with Linux kernel it was just freezing on a completely blank screen after handing over control to the kernel. I really hope they have improved a bit on the verbosity of the kernel when things go wrong - at the time I had nothing to go on to troubleshoot further.

AlleyTrotter 09-06-2013 02:47 PM

When kernel stub booting you must do 1 of 2 things
1. Configure your kernel with a built-in command line defining /'s location
CONFIG_CMDLINE_BOOL=y and CONFIG_CMDLINE= "your root location"
2. boot from the efi shell and tell the stub kernel where / is
The second way seems easier to me
John

syg00 09-06-2013 04:06 PM

A while back when the retailers were (effectively) tossing out SSD Win7 ultra-books so they could screw people over for Win8 units, I grabbed a couple of the Win7. Good units, cheap, and avoided all the (initial) grief of safe boot for us Linux users.

Figured I could then wait until it all got sorted out before having to worry about it. Hopefully that is starting to happen.

AlleyTrotter 09-06-2013 04:46 PM

Yes we are seeing some progress in UEFI boot.
I have been doing it for nearly a year now and am very confident in my methods. I would try to write a how-to, but my mastery of written communication is to be blunt HORRIBLE!
I have given advice which was interpreted exactly the opposite of what I wanted to say more often than I wish to admit.
John

xj25vm 09-07-2013 03:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlleyTrotter (Post 5023310)
I would try to write a how-to, but my mastery of written communication is to be blunt HORRIBLE!

Hmm - judging by your post, there isn't much evidence of that :-)

jtsn 09-08-2013 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlleyTrotter (Post 5021067)
To those who still dual boot windows this may be of use. It describes setting up a secure boot kernel.
http://www.linuxfoundation.org/news-...d-linux-kernel

These instructions don't mention dual-boot at all. Actually by removing all keys as described, you may not be able to boot Windows again.

AlleyTrotter 09-08-2013 05:34 PM

Well like I said I don't boot windows. I thought the post would help someone who wanted to create keys to secure boot alongside windows. I believe the software used can not just erase a secure boot key but can also add a new one to secure boot linux along with windows.
I realize the GH is not going to give instructions to dual boot, but it seems to me that one could use the given explanation with some simple modifications to create a windows/linux secure boot option in the efi partition.
Sorry if you don't see it that way, my bad
John

dr.s 09-20-2013 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlleyTrotter (Post 5021110)
That is correct it describes how to create a secure boot kernel which can be used to dual boot with Windows without disabling secure boot. To UEFI boot you must have a EFI partition with a fat filesystem no matter the OS used.
If its no help to you it may be help to others.
No bootloader is needed because the kernel acts as its own bootloader.
Personally I haven't used windows in quite some time, however I do use UEFI boot with slackware.
John

Thanks for the link, I tried this on a new laptop here (didn't want to remove the ugly windows 8 yet) and managed to dual boot, I didn't bother messing with the keys and the secure part though.

Skaperen 09-20-2013 10:32 AM

Last time I bought a computer with Windows on it, I took the hard drive out first, and made a raw image copy of it using another computer (unfortunately too many people do not have "another computer" or the skills/knowledge to do all this stuff). That way, I could later restore the exact image that was on there and claim I never agreed to any EULA. But I could also erase that disk (and did) so Windows was never in the way of making things work, and yet still be able to put Windows back if I needed to.


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