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Old 06-28-2019, 06:00 PM   #16
colorpurple21859
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at grub prompt
configfile (hd0)/EFI/BOOT/grub.cfg

Last edited by colorpurple21859; 06-28-2019 at 08:32 PM.
 
Old 06-30-2019, 12:53 AM   #17
deretsigernu
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I used the command as directed. The response was a blank screen. After that, it takes a couple of minutes to get back to the prompt.

Then I used:
"cat (hd0)/EFI/BOOT/grub.cfg"

And that returned

"error: failure reading sector 0x80 from 'hd0'"

It seems there is no GRUB file to refer to. This is in UEFI mode where slackware never seemed to install or at least, where the partition with slackware isn't recognized for some reason. The GRUB prompt mentioned just above comes from trying to read the install ISO DVD when UEFI is enabled. Something's happening where the disc doesn't run/get read correctly, just gives a very long delay before showing the GRUB prompt. The same disc works when I'm in Legacy mode.

In Legacy mode, I've run the slackware installation several times now. Slackware is on the computer, but that's when Legacy is enabled.

I don't know why when UEFI is enabled, the Slackware partition isn't recognized. Well, I think I do know why: the boot partition or manager or loader (I'm confused about which it is) is not set up to recognize the slackware partition in UEFI, where in Legacy mode, it's different: the boot partition on the HDD doesn't find Windows or slackware (says "Please install an operating system on your hard disk" when I just boot from HDD), but I can use the USB to boot slackware in Legacy.

Could it be that I need to fix the EFI partition in Legacy mode? This way Windows will be recognized in that mode (since it currently isn't when the mode is enabled) and then I can use the USB to log into slackware and try to run GRUB there to set up a boot loader menu?
 
Old 06-30-2019, 07:57 AM   #18
colorpurple21859
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Since that did not work, you can search for the /EFI partition from the grub prompt with
Code:
ls
that will give you a list of drives/partitions then for example
Code:
ls (hd0,1)/
or maybe
Code:
ls (hd1,1)/
then you can use the configfile commmand and change the hdo accordingly
 
Old 06-30-2019, 02:24 PM   #19
Richard Cranium
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Given that the Slackware 14.2 installation iso does not use grub (to the best of my knowledge, at any rate), I suspect that you've not mentioned something.
 
Old 07-01-2019, 09:03 AM   #20
deretsigernu
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@Richard Cranium I have no reason to leave anything out. I’m asking for help and trying to supply as much info about my situation as possible. I’m very perplexed by why the ISO keeps doing what it’s doing, since other DVDs work okay in the drive. The computer was brand new a couple of weeks ago came with Windows 10 and the only OS I’ve tried to install on it so far is Slackware. I had the 32 bit ISO and seemed to get that going, but everything has gone sideways since. If there is something that you think I’m neglecting, feel free to let me know. I’ve tried to put as much detail into the posts I’ve made i this thread, I don’t know what else to include.
 
Old 07-01-2019, 03:34 PM   #21
enorbet
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It seems to me the difficulty in reaching a cooperative environment may have to do with inconsistencies. If one wants to be able to boot Win10 that was installed expressly for a UEFI boot, including the requisite GPT partition scheme, then the Slackware partition should ALSO be GPT. That alone may solve the issue but it is likely easier once all partitions are GPT to simply use UEFI boot process and eLILO. AFAIK Slackware will provide the eLILO option IF the Slackware partition is GPT. I suspect it is not. Is that true, deretsigernu?

AFAIK the only other option is Legacy MBR partitioning which would require a complete reinstall of Win10, though it is beyond me why anyone at all familiar with Linux would want it. Although I have gone for over a year at a time without ever booting it, I still have Win7 and I will NEVER buy and install 10 on any boxen of mine, but to each his own.
 
Old 07-01-2019, 08:50 PM   #22
deretsigernu
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@enorbet, I wonder if it’s cause I used 32-bit ISO and got Slackware installed that way at first on the machine. Since then, I started the thread, so most of the stuff I’ve tried has been from here. Like getting the 64 bit version. I’m about at the point of reinstalling everything. I use Windows because I use GIS a lot and QGIS is always a couple versions behind on Linux. If it’s not in a repository and I have to try to use a tarball or something, I don’t do that stuff enough to remember everything that has to checked and linked and what not to get it installed correctly. And I’m not a computer expert like a lot of people here, so when it comes to the minutiae of settings on Windows or Linux , I’m behind the 8 ball. For example, I don’t know how the Slackware partition would have been changed fromGPT while the other partitions are GPT. And I’m not sure how to check or change it. Before UEFI , setting up dual boot took some tweaking , but now I feel like I’m totally over my head. I’ve spent a lot of time doing web searches after you and other people have given advice in this thread. I do immensely appreciate the help you have given so far.
 
Old 07-02-2019, 07:36 AM   #23
enorbet
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Hello deretsigernu,

There are many Linux services/commands that can reveal what partitioning scheme you have. One common one is simply

Code:
 fdisk -l
If it is scary for you to invoke the sometimes risky power of fdisk please note that the "-l" switch is for "list" and no other action is or even can be taken. A little more risky, but more informative and filled with "safety nets" is the "gdisk" command. It will deliver information on any partition and warn strongly before unleashing it's power to not only list, but convert MBR and GPT partitions. A simple typed "Q" exits with no further action. The many variations of "parted", whether CLI or GUI will also gather information and require input from the admin to "apply" any scheduled alterations... easily avoided if one only wants information.

If you discover that your Linux partition is indeed MBR and prefer to use UEFI rather than Legacy MBR mode requiring a GPT scheme, I suggest getting a Live (bootable) Linux tool set like Hirens Bootable CD and doing the work from outside the hard drive, whether from USB or actual optical drive. Just do plenty of research first or even try it out on an old disk for practice and confidence. Ever since the release decades ago of Partition Magic, which GUI based parted is loosely based on, partitioning is not at all scary, but actually quite fun once you have that confidence of a little experience. Surely you can find a practice drive somewhere? People commonly throw old, still working drives in the trash.
 
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Old 07-02-2019, 09:16 AM   #24
colorpurple21859
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Quote:
Slackware partition would have been changed fromGPT while the other partitions are GPT.
GPT in not a partition thing but a drive thingy. The whole drive will be either type gpt or msdos not a partition.
 
Old 07-02-2019, 10:51 AM   #25
bassmadrigal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
If you discover that your Linux partition is indeed MBR and prefer to use UEFI rather than Legacy MBR mode requiring a GPT scheme, I suggest getting a Live (bootable) Linux tool set like Hirens Bootable CD and doing the work from outside the hard drive, whether from USB or actual optical drive. Just do plenty of research first or even try it out on an old disk for practice and confidence.
You can even switch from MBR to GPT without data loss using one of the gdisk utilities (gdisk, cgdisk, or sgdisk) when booting off the Slackware installation media.

Quote:
Originally Posted by colorpurple21859 View Post
GPT in not a partition thing but a drive thingy. The whole drive will be either type gpt or msdos not a partition.
Just to provide a bit of clarification for those who may not understand. GPT and MBR are a "partition thing" in that they are both standards on how partition tables are written to the disk. The whole disk will be either GPT or MBR (although there's an optional hybrid setup that can be used for older systems that may not recognize GPT, but it is not technically part of the GPT spec and most everything supports GPT now unless you're running an old legacy system).

Once the partition table is created as either MBR or GPT (tools will do this automatically based on your selection), the rest (creating partitions, formatting, etc) is the same between the two (although GPT has support for larger drives and many more primary partitions).
 
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Old 07-02-2019, 11:45 AM   #26
Gerardo Zamudio
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Do you have a strong technical reason to use Slackware 14.2 and/or LILO? Have you considered using Slackware -current and/or GRUB?

I just built a new PC last week and didn't bother with 14.2. It's too old. This was also my first time with UEFI, GPT, and Windows 10 (Windows 7 did not support my motherboard no matter how many drivers I slipstreamed into the ISO). These are the exact steps I took installing on NVME M.2 SSD, but it's the same on any disk:

(You already have Windows 10 installed so this is not really necessary)
  1. Go to the "BIOS" (UEFI) settings in your motherboard and:
    • Disable Secure Boot
    • Disable CSM (Compatibility Support Module).
    • Enable UEFI everywhere (network boot, legacy OPROM, PCI-e, storage options). This isn't really necessary but I didn't want any chance for any device to try to use BIOS by accident.
  2. Boot Gparted Live from a USB drive. https://gparted.org/liveusb.php. Use a recent image so it will have UEFI support. If you just dd if=gparted-live.iso of=/dev/your-usb-drive, it will work.
  3. Using Gparted, select the drive that will have Windows and Slackware and go to View > Device Information. Make sure it says GPT. See my screenshot for reference.

This is a new drive. At first I made my own Windows and Slackware partition, but then realized you have to have those other partitions for UEFI to work. I decided to just let Windows take care of that. I ended up just setting the drive as GPT drive with no partitions.

During the Windows installation, I select my empty GPT drive and told it to make a new partition. Windows detects the drive is empty and warns you it will create additional partitions before the main one which is what shows in my screenshot. Continue with installation. The drive now has 4 partitions created by Windows and unallocated space after that.

Slackware -current install:
  1. Go through the install process. I never bother with swap. In the target partitions section, it will automatically detect the EFI partition for you. Feel free to add your Windows partition, too.
  2. When asked to install ELILO, say no.
  3. When the installer is finished, select Exit from the Setup menu and don't reboot. You will drop into a shell.
  4. Install GRUB
    Code:
    chroot /mnt
    grub-install /dev/your-drive-here
    grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg
    exit
    reboot
The PC should boot and show the GRUB bootloader.

Notes:
  • In my case, Windows wasn't available in the menu. I booted into Slackware and ran grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg again and this time it got added.
  • You will have to run that command every time you update the kernel
  • After booting into Windows 10 to play a game and then later wanting to go into Slackware, I have found Windows sets the Windows Boot Manager as the first boot option in my motherboard settings. To disable this, you need to turn off hibernate and fast boot in the Windows settings.
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Old 07-02-2019, 12:59 PM   #27
colorpurple21859
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Quote:
You will have to run that command every time you update the kernel
if you use vmlinuz or vmlinuz-huge or vmlinuz-generic you won't have to do this with slackware
 
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Old 07-02-2019, 02:29 PM   #28
Didier Spaier
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Hello Gerardo, thanks for the feed-back.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerardo Zamudio View Post
If you just dd if=gparted-live.iso of=/dev/your-usb-drive, it will work.
Or just cp gparted-live.iso /dev/your-usb-drive
Quote:
Notes:
  • In my case, Windows wasn't available in the menu. I booted into Slackware and ran grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg again and this time it got added.
I made some tests of dual boot Windows 10+Slint64-14.2.1.2 in qemu VMs (in both EFI and Legacy contexts) and observed that too. I am wondering if just typing partprobe after grub-install and before grub-mkconfig would help. I will test.
 
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Old 07-02-2019, 10:23 PM   #29
deretsigernu
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Wow, there have been a lot of replies in the last 24 hours or so. Looks like good info. Unfortunately, I won't get to try any of these suggestions for a couple more days. But a quick reply to some of the points made:

I have used fdisk before. The slackware partition that I had currently installed in Legacy mode is messed up now or I would use fdisk there to see what is going on. I don't know what I did to that partition, but when I tried to boot it a day ago, I got a kernel panic instead.

I had no particular reason to pick slackware64-14.2. I only used it because it was the default version. I have seen discussions about "-current", but I don't quite get what that version is about. I think I was looking into something about repositories when it came up. I didn't realize it was a completely different version.

I'm definitely not married to the idea of LILO. I had made a couple of much older dual boots that relied on GRUB(2) and feel more comfortable with it. LILO is the default with the current install and so I was just trying to avoid making more work for myself by using GRUB2 instead. My most recent dual boot is Win7 and 14.1 and that uses LILO and I think that got set up with minimal effort. It was definitely not with a UEFI machine.

I will download Gparted and try to use the steps suggested by Gerardo Zamudio. I was thinking that I need to reinstall everything anyway at this point. At the moment though, I don't have any of the other discs handy for reinstalls and whatnot.

Thanks to everyone who has contributed to this thread.
 
Old 07-02-2019, 11:31 PM   #30
bassmadrigal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deretsigernu View Post
I had no particular reason to pick slackware64-14.2. I only used it because it was the default version. I have seen discussions about "-current", but I don't quite get what that version is about. I think I was looking into something about repositories when it came up. I didn't realize it was a completely different version.
-current is the development version of Slackware. It will eventually become the next stable release. Even though -current is a development version, it does tend to be mostly problem free, although, things will pop up occasionally. And it is expected that occasionally, as core packages are upgraded, that you will need to rebuild your 3rd-party packages.

It is not generally recommend to run -current unless you want to test the new version, or the latest stable just doesn't work with your hardware.
 
  


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