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Old 05-01-2019, 12:37 PM   #61
fatmac
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Yeah.....& I still run Atom notebooks, an old (2008) Toshiba, from an SDHC card, with 2GB ram & a 1.3GHz Celeron, & even keep my Asus EeeBox going with 2GB ram..... :lol:

Old is as old as you want to make it, if you run Linux, or BSD, on it so much the better.
 
Old 05-01-2019, 04:34 PM   #62
Richard Cranium
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyCyborg View Post
I thought that "older computers" refers to something driven by a CPU on AM2 or 775 sockets for example, not about ancient hardware.
The world existed before you did.
 
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Old 05-01-2019, 06:35 PM   #63
andrew.46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyCyborg View Post
Honestly, I had hope for this thread, as a place where to discuss about my own "older computers", but I am really disappointed about this "grandpa's takeover" which happen always.
Young people these days .....

 
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Old 05-01-2019, 06:46 PM   #64
upnort
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Honestly, I had hope for this thread, as a place where to discuss about my own "older computers", but I am really disappointed about this "grandpa's takeover" which happen always.
Considering the average age profile of the Slackware community, most are grandpas. Young folks with an ounce of wisdom realize they can learn a thing or two from grandpas.

Take a chill pill whippersnapper.
 
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Old 05-01-2019, 07:07 PM   #65
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyCyborg View Post
Honestly, I had hope for this thread, as a place where to discuss about my own "older computers", but I am really disappointed about this "grandpa's takeover" which happen always.
Chill bruh.

https://i.kym-cdn.com/entries/icons/...fellowkids.jpg
 
Old 05-02-2019, 03:54 AM   #66
Lysander666
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyCyborg View Post
Seriously? We can talk exclusively either about ThreadRippers and multiple thousands worth boxes or about hardware from '70 ?

I thought that "older computers" refers to something driven by a CPU on AM2 or 775 sockets for example, not about ancient hardware.

Please take no ofense, I love the stories about WfW, as I love also my grandpa's stories about how he fought on Stalingrad, but I am feed up about those MSDOS 5 era stories, just like about the ones from someone with a Texan hat and smoking a Cuban cigar, explaining us that buying annually a $1000 video-card is very cheap.

Honestly, I had hope for this thread, as a place where to discuss about my own "older computers", but I am really disappointed about this "grandpa's takeover" which happen always.
The older generation is one of the best things about the Slackware forum. Look at any other Linux forum - Mint, Debian, Devuan, Ubuntu etc, even Gentoo, - and you'll see the quality of posting and debate pales in comparison to the Slackware forum. The standard elsewhere is generally immature and infantile in comparison to here.

I personally find this kind of talk fascinating and have spent many hours speaking to my older brother about his Unix experiences from the '70s and '80s [as an aside, one day I'll record a talk with him about it and, with his permission, post the contents here]. Even details such as why tty is called tty are interesting.

Seriously, Monsieur Cyborg, play Dunnet, have a look at the older Unix history that took us to where we are now, it's very interesting stuff. I don't want to know about LGA775 computers, or about how someone got something to once run on a - gasp - Pentium 4. The older the better.

One day you may be a grandpa, and hopefully you'll have something worth imparting - otherwise we won't listen either

Last edited by Lysander666; 05-02-2019 at 03:55 AM.
 
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Old 05-02-2019, 07:09 AM   #67
fatmac
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Quote:
why tty is called tty
Quote:
TTY Drivers. A tty device gets its name from the very old abbreviation of teletypewriter and was originally associated only with the physical or virtual terminal connection to a Unix machine.
So now everyone knows.....
 
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Old 05-02-2019, 07:44 AM   #68
hazel
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I first used a computer via a converted teletype machine! That was in 1975.
 
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Old 05-02-2019, 08:10 AM   #69
cwizardone
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Back in the late '60s I had access to a computer processing center.
As the floor was raised about 12 inches or so, you walked up a ramp to an air lock, two sets of doors, to enter. What I'm assuming were the actual computers were about 2-1/2 feet wide, 4 feet tall and foot deep. The floor was raised so they could run air-conditioning ducts to the underside of each of these boxes and air was forced up and through the boxes. You could hold your hand over the top of these boxes and feel air coming through the grill on the top.
They were headless and there were... I only remember one, might have been more, keyboards attached to printers which were fed paper, tractor-fed is what I think it is called. No screen. The operator would type a command and it would be typed on the paper and then the response would follow.
The data was stored on tape. Large reels and the tape was... about an inch wide.........
 
Old 05-02-2019, 08:42 AM   #70
hazel
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Yes, I remember. The computer room at BRE was very similar. There was a suction mat at the door, because dust could be fatal to the disk drives; their reading heads were not enclosed like on modern hard drives but merely floated above the disk surface.

In our computer room, only one of those metal cabinets was an actual computer.The others contained disk and tape drives. Tape mostly because disks were tiny in capacity (though huge in physical terms). The whole lot were linked together by underfloor cabling.

After the teletype was retired, we used Decwriters as terminals. Anyone remember them? They printed onto 120-column fan-fold paper with sprocket holes down the sides and alternate horizontal green and white stripes. The same paper was used for the line printer, which stood just outside the computer room so that people could come and remove their printouts without having to enter the holy of holies.

Last edited by hazel; 05-02-2019 at 08:45 AM.
 
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Old 05-02-2019, 09:15 AM   #71
cwizardone
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Sounds right.
Was that paper about 2 feet wide or wider?
The tape readers were "open face" and a row of them lined a back wall.

The press office had a row of teletype machines lined up in the hallway and late at night, when I had the time, I would read the news coming off the machines while sipping a cup of coffee. I think that was called "coming off the wire." It was printed on cheap, off white paper. Rolls of the stuff were quite heavy relative to their size.

Last edited by cwizardone; 05-02-2019 at 10:26 AM.
 
Old 05-02-2019, 09:51 AM   #72
hazel
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That's right! Rolls. I remember them now. Whereas the printer/Decwriter paper was fan-fold, so could be stored flat. But why was the paper striped? Can anyone explain that?

Last edited by hazel; 05-02-2019 at 09:53 AM.
 
Old 05-02-2019, 10:00 AM   #73
fatmac
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Quote:
But why was the paper striped? Can anyone explain that?
If it was across the paper/page, it was to help you to keep your place, like they used to use on wide spreadsheet printouts the accounts office used to use, green & white stripey paper. Then they got those pneumatic ruler type things that would move down a line at a time.
 
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Old 05-02-2019, 10:08 AM   #74
ehartman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
After the teletype was retired, we used Decwriters as terminals. Anyone remember them? They printed onto 120-column fan-fold paper with sprocket holes down the sides and alternate horizontal green and white stripes.
Hazel, that already must have been a DECwriter II or III, the original DECwriter had 80 column paper (and it didn't have to be green and white, we used pure white, with a darker line every two printed textlines).
At the University of Amsterdam I started my computer career on a PDP-11/10 (32 KB of CORE memory) with such a DECwriter as terminal/printer and a Tektronix 4010 graphical terminal for normal usage and graphics (of course). This was in the middle 70's.
That PDP was later replaced by a 11/04 with a whopping 64 KB of MOS ram (of which you could only use 56, the maximum for those small PDP models).
 
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Old 05-02-2019, 10:15 AM   #75
hazel
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We had PDP-11s but not in the library. They were used by the research scientists because you could have them in the laboratory; they didn't need a controlled dust-free atmosphere or elaborate cooling. I have never used one though.
 
  


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