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D1ver 04-21-2010 07:22 AM

Keeping up to date
 
Sorry to ask a question you've probably seen a million times, but I have a quick question involving keeping my slackware 13.0 -stable up to date.

Following a guide I found through google I ran the following command

Code:

lftp -c "open http://www.slackware.at/data/slackware-13.0/patches/ ; mirror -e -n packages"
which proceeded to download a large number of packages onto my system. I noticed it was downloading some kernel related packages and after checking the change logs it seems my kernel could be updated, which will require a reinstall of LiLo?

What's involved in reinstalling LiLo and how likely am I to cripple my system if I go ahead and run that upgradepkg *.txz command?


Thanks guys

damgar 04-21-2010 07:53 AM

Since you are sticking with -stable, not too likely, it's mostly just rebuilds of what you already have installed. I don't know why you wouldn't just use slackpkg though. It's meant for doing just what you are trying to do.

Having said all that, there is always a chance of things going wrong.

Read CHANGELOG.TXT from the mirror you used to download the packages to see exactly what's being upgraded, and why it was changed.

Rerunning lilo generally isn't traumatic, and it has the nice feature of telling you if something isn't right, giving you the opportunity to fix things before you reboot. It's just a matter of doing:
Code:

lilo
as root.

Lufbery 04-21-2010 08:00 AM

That command is what I use to update Slackware, and I wrote a script that automates most of that process.

Bear in mind, though, that most folks like to use slackpkg (which comes with Slackware) to update their systems.

Having said that, now that you've downloaded all the patches to a local directory, su to your root user and run:

Code:

upgradepkg *.txz
Then cd into the /linux-2.6.29.6-3 sub-directory and run the same command.

At this point your system is updated. After this point, the process is the same regardless of whether you used slackpkg or did things by hand.

Now that your kernel is updated, you need to rerun lilo by typing:

Code:

lilo
at the command line.

If you're using an initial RAM disk, then check out the README.initrd file, which will step you through updating your LILO configuration to boot to the new kernel.

It's really just the same procedure one goes through when first installing Slackware.

Regards,

Lufbery 04-21-2010 08:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by damgar (Post 3942614)
Since you are sticking with -stable, not too likely, it's mostly just rebuilds of what you already have installed. I don't know why you wouldn't just use slackpkg though. It's meant for doing just what you are trying to do.

Damgar,

Does slackpkg rerun lilo after a kernel update? If so, does it handle the initrd?

Genuinely curious,

brianL 04-21-2010 08:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lufbery (Post 3942627)
Damgar,

Does slackpkg rerun lilo after a kernel update? If so, does it handle the initrd?

Genuinely curious,

I'm not Damgar, but...yes, slackpkg asks if you want it to run lilo.

damgar 04-21-2010 08:08 AM

It doesn't run lilo, it tells you that your kernel packages have been upgraded and that you need to run lilo, and then asks you if you'd like to run it now, which it then will do if you say yes.

You do have a choice.

Initrd's are always manual to the best of my knowledge. Although you could probably automate it using the initrd generator.

Lufbery 04-21-2010 11:42 AM

Brian and damgar,

Thanks for the info. That's pretty cool.

Regards,

D1ver 04-21-2010 08:27 PM

Updated and ran lilo and everything seemed to work fine!

Thanks for the help, and next time i might have to look into slackpkg.

I always get a little nervous when i see the word "Kernel" :D

damgar 04-21-2010 08:54 PM

Yeah it's just
Code:

slackpkg update
slackpkg install-new
slackpkg upgrade-all

Further more the blacklist file:
Code:

/etc/slackpkg/blacklist
already has the kernel entries, so that if you don't want to upgrade the kernel automatically you just uncomment the lines.

From the /etc/slackpkg/blacklist
Quote:

# Automated upgrade of kernel packages aren't a good idea (and you need to
# run "lilo" after upgrade). If you think the same, uncomment the lines
# below
#
#kernel-ide
#kernel-modules
#kernel-source
#kernel-headers
In addition to that, setting slackpkg up is as easy as uncommenting one line in one file. It's pretty nice although I can definitely understand why someone would want to do everything manually. I've found it's best to wait a day or so after the changelog changes or at the very least to look closesly at the mirror prior to running slackpkg.


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